glossaries-extra.sty v1.32: an extension to the glossaries package

Nicola L.C. Talbot
 
Dickimaw Books
http://www.dickimaw-books.com/

2018-05-24

Abstract

The glossaries-extra package is an extension to the glossaries package, providing additional features. Some of the features provided by this package are only available with glossaries version 4.19 (or above). This document assumes familiarity with the glossaries package.

The file example-glossaries-xr.tex contains dummy entries with cross-references that may be used for creating minimal working examples for testing the glossaries-extra package. (The base glossaries package provides additional files, but this one needs glossaries-extra.) There are equivalent .bib files for use with bib2gls.

Since glossaries-extra internally loads the glossaries package, you also need to have glossaries installed and all the packages that glossaries depends on (including, but not limited to, tracklang, mfirstuc, etoolbox, xkeyval (at least version dated 2006/11/18), textcase, xfor, datatool-base and amsgen. These packages are all available in the current TEX Live and MikTEX distributions. If any of them are missing, please update your TEX distribution using your update manager. (For help on this see, for example, How do I update my TEX distribution? or Updating TEX on Linux.)

Additional resources:

Contents

1 Introduction
 1.1 Package Defaults
 1.2 New or Modified Package Options
2 Modifications to Existing Commands and Styles
 2.1 Entry Indexing
 2.2 Cross-References (“see” and “see also”)
 2.3 Entry Display Style Modifications
 2.4 Entry Counting Modifications
 2.5 Unsetting the First Use Flag
 2.6 Plurals
 2.7 Nested Links
 2.8 Acronym Style Modifications
 2.9 glossary-bookindex package
 2.10 Glossary Style Modifications
  2.10.1 Style Hooks
  2.10.2 Number List
  2.10.3 The glossaries-extra-stylemods Package
3 Abbreviations
 3.1 Tagging Initials
 3.2 Abbreviation Styles
 3.3 Shortcut Commands
 3.4 Predefined Abbreviation Styles
  3.4.1 Predefined Abbreviation Styles that Set the Regular Attribute
  3.4.2 Predefined Abbreviation Styles that Don’t Set the Regular Attribute
 3.5 Defining New Abbreviation Styles
4 Entries in Sectioning Titles, Headers, Captions and Contents
5 Categories
6 Counting References
 6.1 Entry Counting (First Use Flag)
 6.2 Link Counting
7 Auto-Indexing
8 On-the-Fly Document Definitions
9 bib2gls: Managing Reference Databases
 9.1 Selection
 9.2 Sorting and Displaying the Glossary
 9.3 The glossaries-extra-bib2gls package
 9.4 Supplementary Commands
 9.5 Record Counting
10 Miscellaneous New Commands
 10.1 Entry Fields
 10.2 Display All Entries Without Sorting or Indexing
 10.3 Standalone Entry Items
 10.4 Entry Aliases
11 Supplemental Packages
 11.1 Prefixes or Determiners
 11.2 Accessibility Support
12 Sample Files
13 Multi-Lingual Support
Glossary

1. Introduction

The glossaries package is a flexible package, but it’s also a heavy-weight package that uses a lot of resources. As package developer, I’m caught between those users who complain about the drawbacks of a heavy-weight package with a large user manual and those users who want more features (which necessarily adds to the package weight and manual size).

The glossaries-extra package is an attempt to provide a compromise for this conflict. Version 4.22 of the glossaries package is the last version to incorporate new features.1.1 Future versions of glossaries will just be bug fixes. New features will instead be added to glossaries-extra. This means that the base glossaries package won’t increase in terms of package loading time and allocation of resources, but those users who do want extra features available will have more of a chance of getting their feature requests accepted.

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1.1 Package Defaults

I’m not happy with some of the default settings assumed by the glossaries package, and, judging from code I’ve seen, other users also seem unhappy with them, as certain package options are often used in questions posted on various sites. I can’t change the default behaviour of glossaries as it would break backward compatibility, but since glossaries-extra is a separate package, I have decided to implement some of these commonly-used options by default. You can switch them back if they’re not appropriate.

The new defaults are:

The examples below illustrate the difference in explicit package options between glossaries and glossaries-extra. There may be other differences resulting from modifications to commands provided by glossaries (see §2 Modifications to Existing Commands and Styles).

  1. \documentclass{article}  
    \usepackage{glossaries-extra}

    This is like:

    \documentclass{article}  
    \usepackage[toc,nopostdot]{glossaries}  
    \usepackage{glossaries-extra}

  2. \documentclass[british]{article}  
    \usepackage{babel}  
    \usepackage{glossaries-extra}

    This is like:

    \documentclass[british]{article}  
    \usepackage{babel}  
    \usepackage[toc,nopostdot,translate=babel]{glossaries}  
    \usepackage{glossaries-extra}

  3. \documentclass{memoir}  
    \usepackage{glossaries-extra}

    This is like:

    \documentclass{memoir}  
    \usepackage[toc,nopostdot,noredefwarn]{glossaries}  
    \usepackage{glossaries-extra}

    However

    \documentclass{memoir}  
    \usepackage{glossaries}  
    \usepackage{glossaries-extra}

    This is like:

    \documentclass{memoir}  
    \usepackage[toc,nopostdot]{glossaries}  
    \usepackage{glossaries-extra}

    Since by the time glossaries-extra has been loaded, glossaries has already redefined memoir’s glossary-related commands.

Another noticeable change is that by default \printglossary will now display information text in the document if the external glossary file doesn’t exist. This is explanatory text to help new users who can’t work out what to do next to complete the document build. Once the document is set up correctly and the external files have been generated, this text will disappear.

This change is mostly likely to be noticed by users with one or more redundant empty glossaries who ignore transcript messages, explicitly use makeindex/xindy on just the non-empty glossary (or glossaries) and use the iterative \printglossaries command instead of \printglossary. For example, consider the following:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[acronym]{glossaries}  
\makeglossaries  
\newacronym{laser}{laser}{light amplification by stimulated  
emission of radiation}  
\begin{document}  
\gls{laser}  
\printglossaries  
\end{document}

The above document will only display the list of acronyms at the place where \printglossaries occurs. However it will also attempt to input the .gls file associated with the main glossary.

If you use makeglossaries, you’ll get the warning message:

Warning: File 'test.glo' is empty.  
Have you used any entries defined in glossary 'main'?  
Remember to use package option 'nomain' if you  
don't want to use the main glossary.

(where the original file is called test.tex) but if you simply call makeindex directly to generate the .acr file (without attempting to create the .gls file) then the transcript file will always contain the message:

No file test.gls.

This doesn’t occur with makeglossaries as it will create the .gls file containing the single command \null.

If you simply change from glossaries to glossaries-extra in this document, you’ll find a change in the resulting PDF if you don’t use makeglossaries and you only generate the .acr file with makeindex.

The transcript file will still contain the message about the missing .gls, but now you’ll also see information in the actual PDF document. The simplest remedy is to follow the advice inserted into the document at that point, which is to add the nomain package option:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[nomain,acronym,postdot]{glossaries-extra}  
\makeglossaries  
\setabbreviationstyle[acronym]{long-short}  
\newacronym{laser}{laser}{light amplification by stimulated  
emission of radiation}  
\begin{document}  
\gls{laser}  
\printglossaries  
\end{document}

(Note the need to set the acronym style using \setabbreviationstyle before \newacronym. See §3 Abbreviations for further details.)

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1.2 New or Modified Package Options

If you haven’t already loaded glossaries, you can use any of the package options provided by glossaries when you load glossaries-extra and they will automatically be passed to glossaries (which glossaries-extra will load). If glossaries has already been loaded, then those options will be passed to \setupglossaries, but remember that not all of the glossaries package options may be used in that command.

This section only lists options that are either unrecognised by the glossaries package or are a modified version of options of the same name provided by glossaries. See the glossaries user manual for details about the unmodified options.

The new and modified options provided by glossaries-extra are described below:

debug
The glossaries package has a debug option that allows the values false, true and showtargets. The debug=showtargets option was introduced to glossaries v4.32, so if you want to use this option with glossaries-extra you must make sure that your version of glossaries supports it.

The glossaries-extra package extends this option to provide the additional values debug=showwrgloss and debug=all.

The debug=showwrgloss option implements debug=true and uses


\glsxtrwrglossmark  \glsxtrwrglossmark

to show a mark just before the write operation performed by the indexing commands. If you use record=alsoindex there will be a mark for the write operation to the .aux file for bib2gls and a mark for the write operation to the associated glossary file for makeindex or xindy.

The debug=all option implements both debug=showtargets and debug=showwrgloss.

postdot
(New to version 1.12.) This option is just a shortcut for nopostdot=false.
postpunc
(New to version 1.21.) This option sets the post-description punctuation to the given value. For example: postpunc=; does
\renewcommand{\glspostdescription}{;}

The value may also be one of the following keywords:

comma:
postpunc=comma is equivalent to
\renewcommand{\glspostdescription}{,}

dot:
postpunc=dot is equivalent to
\renewcommand{\glspostdescription}{.\spacefactor\sfcode`\. }

none:
postpunc=none is equivalent to
\renewcommand{\glspostdescription}{}

The default definition is

\newcommand*{\glspostdescription}{%  
  \ifglsnopostdot\else.\spacefactor\sfcode`\. \fi  
}

where the conditional is determined by the nopostdot package option. The postpunc option removes the conditional from the definition of \glspostdescription. The package options nopostdot and postdot will restore the original definition of \glspostdescription.

The glossaries-extra-stylemods package adjusts the predefined styles that had a hard-coded \space before the number list so that they use \glsxtrprelocation instead (which is defined to \space). You can therefore redefine this command in combination with postpunc to alter the separator before the number list. For example, to have a comma followed by \hfil:

\usepackage[postpunc=comma,stylemods]{glossaries-extra}  
\renewcommand{\glsxtrprelocation}{\hfil}

Be careful with doing this as it will look odd if the number list is missing. (With bib2gls you can instead redefine \glsxtrprelocation to do nothing and set the location prefixes with loc-prefix which will only apply if the entry has a number list.)

accsupp
Load the glossaries-accsupp package (if not already loaded).

If you want to define styles that can interface with the accessibility support provided by glossaries-accsupp use the \glsaccessxxx⟩ type of commands instead of \glsentryxxx⟩ (for example, \glsaccesstext instead of \glsentrytext). If glossaries-accsupp hasn’t been loaded those commands are equivalent (for example, \glsaccesstext just does \glsentrytext) but if it has been loaded, then the \glsaccessxxx⟩ commands will add the accessibility information. (See §11.2 Accessibility Support for further details.)

Note that the accsupp option can only be used as a package option (not through \glossariesextrasetup) since the glossaries-accsupp package must be loaded before glossaries-extra if it’s required.

stylemods
This is a ⟨key⟩=⟨value⟩ option used to load the glossaries-extra-stylemods package. The value may be a comma-separated list of options to pass to that package. (Remember to group ⟨value⟩ if it contains any commas.) The value may be omitted if no options need to be passed. See §2.10 Glossary Style Modifications for further details. There are two special keyword values: stylemods=default (equivalent to omitting the value) and stylemods=all, which loads all the predefined styles.
undefaction
This is a ⟨key⟩=⟨value⟩ option, which has two allowed values: warn and error. This indicates what to do if an undefined glossary entry is referenced. The default behaviour is undefaction=error, which produces an error message (the default for glossaries). You can switch this to a warning message (and ?? appearing in the text) with undefaction=warn.

Undefined entries can’t be picked up by any commands that iterate over a glossary list. This includes \forglsentries and \glsaddall.

indexcrossrefs
This is a boolean option. If true, this will automatically index any cross-referenced entries that haven’t been marked as used at the end of the document. Note that this necessarily adds to the overall document build time, especially if you have defined a large number of entries, so this defaults to false, but it will be automatically switched on if you use the see or seealso keys in any entries (unless autoseeindex=false). To force it off, even if you use the see or seealso key, you need to explicitly set indexcrossrefs to false.

Note that bib2gls can automatically find dependent entries when it parses the .bib source file. The record option automatically implements indexcrossrefs=false.

autoseeindex
(New to v1.16.) This is a boolean option. If true (default), this makes the see and seealso keys automatically index the cross-reference when an entry is defined. If false, the value of those keys will still be stored in their corresponding fields (and can be accessed using commands like \glsxtrusesee and \glsxtruseseealso) but cross-reference won’t be automatically indexed.

Note that the record=only option automatically implements autoseeindex=false.

For example, if an entry is defined as

\newglossaryentry{foo}{name={foo},description={},see={bar,baz}}

then with autoseeindex=true, this is equivalent to

\newglossaryentry{foo}{name={foo},description={}}  
\glssee{foo}{bar,baz}  
\glossariesextrasetup{indexcrossrefs=true}  
\GlsXtrSetField{foo}{see}{bar,baz}

but with autoseeindex=false, this is equivalent to

\newglossaryentry{foo}{name={foo},description={}}  
\GlsXtrSetField{foo}{see}{bar,baz}

Note that indexcrossrefs isn’t automatically implemented by the presence of the see key when autoseeindex is false.

It’s therefore possible to remove the cross-references from the location lists and set their position within the glossary style.

Another method of preventing the automatic indexing is to define the entries before the external indexing files have been opened with \makeglossaries. Since the appropriate file isn’t open, the information can’t be written to it. This will need the package option seenoindex=ignore (provided by glossaries) to prevent an error occurring.

record
(New to v1.08.) This is a ⟨key⟩=⟨value⟩ option provided for the benefit of bib2gls (see §9 bib2gls: Managing Reference Databases).

The option may only be set in the preamble and can’t be used after \GlsXtrLoadResources. If the value is missing record=only is assumed. Permitted values:

off
This is the default setting. The indexing is performed as normal using either \makeglossaries or \makenoidxglossaries. This setting implements undefaction=error.
only
The indexing is performed by bib2gls (see §9 bib2gls: Managing Reference Databases). Neither \makeglossaries nor \makenoidxglossaries is permitted. This setting implements undefaction=warn and automatically loads the supplementary glossaries-extra-bib2gls package. (There should be no need to explicitly load glossaries-extra-bib2gls.)

The glossaries should be displayed using \printunsrtglossary (or \printunsrtglossaries).

The document build process is (assuming the file is called myDoc.tex):

pdflatex myDoc  
bib2gls myDoc  
pdflatex myDoc

Note that record=only will prevent the see from automatically implementing \glssee. (bib2gls deals with the see field.) You may explicitly use \glssee in the document, but bib2gls will ignore the cross-reference if the see field was already set for that entry.

The record=only option will automatically set the glossaries package’s sort=none option if available. (That option value was only introduced to glossaries v4.30.)

alsoindex
This is a hybrid setting that uses bib2gls to fetch entry information from .bib files, but uses makeindex or xindy to create the glossary files. This option should be used with \makeglossaries but not with its optional argument. This option should not be used with \makenoidxglossaries. You may need to change the transcript file used by bib2gls to avoid a clash with the transcript file used by makeindex or xindy. (This can be done with bib2gls’s --log-file or -t option.)

The glossaries should be displayed using \printglossary (or \printglossaries). This option is expected to be used with bib2gls’s sort=none setting and so glossaries-extra-bib2gls is not automatically loaded.

The document build process is (assuming the file is called myDoc.tex):

pdflatex myDoc  
bib2gls myDoc  
pdflatex myDoc  
makeglossaries myDoc  
pdflatex myDoc

With the recording on (record=only or record=alsoindex), any of the commands that would typically index the entry (such as \gls, \glstext or \glsadd) will add a \glsxtr@record entry to the .aux file. bib2gls can then read these lines to find out which entries have been used. (Remember that commands like \glsentryname don’t index, so any use of these commands won’t add a corresponding \glsxtr@record entry to the .aux file.) See §9 bib2gls: Managing Reference Databases for further details.

indexcounter
(New to v1.29.) This option (which doesn’t take a value) is primarily intended for use with bib2gls (v1.4+) and hyperref. It can be used with makeindex or xindy but it will interfere with the number list collation, so you won’t have ranges and you’ll have duplicate page numbers present (but each page number will link to the relevant part of the page where the indexing occurred). This option automatically implements counter=wrglossary.

This option works by incrementing wrglossary and adding \label. This can cause a problem if the indexing occurs in an equation environment as amsmath forbids multiple occurrences of \label (resulting in the “Multiple \label’s” error). It’s best to change the counter to page or equation when in maths mode with this option. For example:

\renewcommand{\glslinkpresetkeys}{%  
 \ifmmode \setkeys{glslink}{counter=equation}\fi}  
\renewcommand{\glsaddpresetkeys}{%  
 \ifmmode \setkeys{glossadd}{counter=equation}\fi}

By default (with hyperref), the page numbers in number lists link back to the top of the relevant page (provided the format uses \glshypernumber). The indexcounter option is designed to link back to the place within the page where the indexing occurred. It does this by creating a new counter (called wrglossary) that’s incremented with \refstepcounter every time an entry is indexed (but not via cross-referencing commands, such as \glssee). A \label is placed immediately after the increment command allowing the back-referenced to be obtained with \pageref. The location, as seen by the indexing application, is the value of the wrglossary counter but this value is substituted with the page reference when number list is typeset. Since the counter is used by all entries and is incremented every time any indexing occurs, neither makeindex nor xindy can correctly collate the lists. For example, if the first term to be referenced is indexed three times on page 5 without any intervening terms then the actual locations obtained from wrglossary will be 1, 2 and 3, which xindy and makeindex will try to form into the range 1–3, but they should actually all simply appear as page 5, whereas it can actually end up with 5–5. Conversely, a range may not be formed where it would naturally occur if just the page counter was used.

Since bib2gls is designed specifically to work with glossaries-extra, bib2gls (v1.4+) will check for wrglossary locations. If the default --merge-wrglossary-records is on, then any records for the same page for a given entry will be merged. In the above example with three references on page 5, only a single record for page 5 for that entry will be added to the number list and it will link back to the first instance on that page. Whereas if you use the --no-merge-wrglossary-records switch, the number list will contain three instance of page 5, with each linking to the corresponding place on that page. In both cases, consecutive pages can form ranges, but it may look strange in the second case.

See the bib2gls documentation for the save-index-counter resource option for more details.

docdef
This option governs the use of \newglossaryentry. It was originally a boolean option, but as from version 1.06, it can now take one of three values (if the value is omitted, true is assumed):
  • \newglossaryentry is not permitted in the document environment (default).
  • \newglossaryentry behaves as it does in the base glossaries package. That is, where its use is permitted in the document environment, it uses the .glsdefs temporary file to store the entry definitions so that on the next LATEX run the entries are defined at the beginning of the document environment. This allows the entry information to be referenced in the glossary, even if the glossary occurs before \newglossaryentry. (For example, when the glossary is displayed in the front matter.) This method of saving the definitions for the next LATEX run has drawbacks that are detailed in the glossaries user manual.

    Remember that if \newglossaryentry wouldn’t be allowed in the document environment with the base glossaries package, then it still won’t be allowed with docdefs=true. If your glossaries occur at the end of the document, consider using docdef=restricted instead.

  • (new to version 1.06) \newglossaryentry is permitted in the document environment without using the .glsdefs file. This means that all entries must be defined before the glossary is displayed, but it avoids the complications associated with saving the entry details in a temporary file. You will still need to take care about any changes made to characters that are required by the ⟨key⟩=⟨value⟩ mechanism (that is, the comma and equal sign) and any makeindex or xindy character that occurs in the sort key or label. If any of those characters are made active in the document, then it can cause problems with the entry definition. This option will allow \newglossaryentry to be used in the document with \makenoidxglossaries, but note that \longnewglossaryentry remains a preamble-only command.

    With this option, if an entry appears in the glossary before it has been defined, an error will occur (or a warning if the undefaction=warn option is used.) If you edit your document and either remove an entry or change its label, you may need to delete the document’s temporary files (such as the .aux and .gls files).

The glossaries package allows \newglossaryentry within the document environment (when used with makeindex or xindy) but the user manual warns against this usage. By default the glossaries-extra package prohibits this, only allowing definitions within the preamble. If you are really determined to define entries in the document environment, despite all the associated drawbacks, you can restore this with docdef=true. Note that this doesn’t change the prohibitions that the glossaries package has in certain circumstances (for example, when using “option 1”). See the glossaries user manual for further details. A better option if document definitions are required is docdef=restricted. Only use docdef=true if document definitions are necessary and one or more of the glossaries occurs in the front matter.

This option affects commands that internally use \newglossaryentry, such as \newabbreviation, but not the “on-the-fly” commands described in §8 On-the-Fly Document Definitions.

nomissingglstext
This is a boolean option. If true, this will suppress the warning text that will appear in the document if the external glossary files haven’t been generated due to an incomplete document build. However, it’s probably simpler just to fix whatever has caused the failure to build the external file or files.
abbreviations
This option has no value and can’t be cancelled. If used, it will automatically create a new glossary with the label abbreviations and redefines \glsxtrabbrvtype to this label. In addition, it defines a shortcut command


\printabbreviations  \printabbreviations[options]

which is equivalent to

\printglossary[type=\glsxtrabbrvtype,options]
The title of the new glossary is given by


\abbreviationsname  \abbreviationsname

If this command is already defined, it’s left unchanged. Otherwise it’s defined to “Abbreviations” if babel hasn’t been loaded or \acronymname if babel has been loaded. However, if you’re using babel it’s likely you will need to change this. (See §13 Multi-Lingual Support for further details.)

If you don’t use the abbreviations package option, the \abbreviationsname command won’t be defined (unless it’s defined by an included language file).

If the abbreviations option is used and the acronym option provided by the glossaries package hasn’t been used, then \acronymtype will be set to \glsxtrabbrvtype so that acronyms defined with \newacronym can be added to the list of abbreviations. If you want acronyms in the main glossary and other abbreviations in the abbreviations glossary then you will need to redefine \acronymtype to main:

\renewcommand*{\acronymtype}{main}

Note that there are no analogous options to the glossaries package’s acronymlists option (or associated commands) as the abbreviation mechanism is handled differently with glossaries-extra.

symbols
This is passed to glossaries but will additionally define


\glsxtrnewsymbol  \glsxtrnewsymbol[options]{label}{symbol}

which is equivalent to

\newglossaryentry{label}{name={symbol},
 sort={label},type=symbols,category=symbol,options}
Note that the sort key is set to the ⟨label⟩ not the ⟨symbol⟩ as the symbol will likely contain commands.
numbers
This is passed to glossaries but will additionally define


\glsxtrnewnumber  \glsxtrnewnumber[options]{number}

which is equivalent to

\newglossaryentry{label}{name={number},
 sort={label},type=numbers,category=number,options}
shortcuts
Unlike the glossaries package option of the same name, this option isn’t boolean but has multiple values:
  • shortcuts=acronyms (or shortcuts=acro): set the shortcuts provided by the glossaries package for acronyms (such as \ac). Note that the short and long forms don’t use \glsxtrshort and \glsxtrlong but use the original \acrshort and \acrlong, which don’t recognise multiple abbreviation styles. The better option with glossaries-extra is shortcuts=ac.
  • shortcuts=ac: set the shortcuts provided by the glossaries package for acronyms (such as \ac) but uses the glossaries-extra interface (such as \glsxtrshort rather than \acrshort). In this case \ac is defined as \cgls rather than \gls.
  • shortcuts=abbreviations (or shortcuts=abbr): set the abbreviation shortcuts provided by glossaries-extra. (See §3.3 Shortcut Commands.) These settings don’t switch on the acronym shortcuts provided by the glossaries package.
  • shortcuts=other: set the “other” shortcut commands, but not the shortcut commands for abbreviations or the acronym shortcuts provided by glossaries. The “other” shortcuts are:
    • \newentry equivalent to \newglossaryentry
    • \newsym equivalent to \glsxtrnewsymbol (see the symbols option).
    • \newnum equivalent to \glsxtrnewnumber (see the numbers option).
  • shortcuts=all (or shortcuts=true): implements shortcuts=ac, shortcuts=abbreviations and shortcuts=other.
  • shortcuts=none (or shortcuts=false): don’t define any of the shortcut commands (default).

Note that multiple invocations of the shortcuts option within the same option list will override each other.

After the glossaries-extra package has been loaded, you can set available options using


\glossariesextrasetup  \glossariesextrasetup{options}

The abbreviations and docdef options may only be used in the preamble. Additionally, docdef can’t be used after \makenoidxglossaries.

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2. Modifications to Existing Commands and Styles

The glossaries package provides \nopostdesc which may be used in the description to suppress the post-description hook. The glossaries-extra package provides another command


\glsxtrnopostpunc  \glsxtrnopostpunc

which has a similar function but only suppresses the post-description punctuation. It doesn’t suppress the use of \glsxtrpostdescription which allows the use of category-dependent post-description hooks. (Note that the punctuation, which is in the original base hook \glspostdescription, comes after the extended post-description hook \glsxtrpostdescription not before.) The post-description hook can counter-act the effect of \glsxtrnopostpunc using


\glsxtrrestorepostpunc  \glsxtrrestorepostpunc

These commands have no effect outside of the glossary (except with standalone entries that use \glsxtractivatenopost and \glspostdescription, see §10.3 Standalone Entry Items).

The glossaries package provides


\glsseeitemformat  \glsseeitemformat{label}

to format items in a cross-reference list (identified with the see key or \glssee). This was originally defined to use \glsentryname{label} since it makes more sense for the cross-reference to match the way the term appears in the glossary. Unfortunately this caused a problem when the name field was sanitized, which used to be the default setting, so glossaries v3.0 changed the default definition of this command to use \glsentrytext instead. Since the name and text field are quite often the same, this change usually doesn’t have a noticeable effect. However, now that the name field is no longer sanitized (following the redesign of glossaries v4.0) it makes more sense to restore this command to its original behaviour, but to take account of abbreviations glossaries-extra redefines this as:

\renewcommand*{\glsseeitemformat}[1]{%  
 \ifglshasshort{\glslabel}{\glsaccesstext{#1}}{\glsaccessname{#1}}%  
}

If you want to restore the glossaries v3.0+ definition just do:

\renewcommand*{\glsseeitemformat}[1]{\glsentrytext{#1}}

The commands used by glossaries to automatically produce an error if an entry is undefined (such as \glsdoifexists) are changed to take the undefaction option into account.

The \newignoredglossary{type} command now (as from v1.11) has a starred version that doesn’t automatically switch off the hyperlinks. This starred version may be used with the targeturl attribute to create a link to an external URL. (See §5 Categories for further details.) As from v1.12 both the starred and unstarred version check that the glossary doesn’t already exist. (The glossaries package omits this check.)

You can now provide an ignored glossary with:


\provideignoredglossary  \provideignoredglossary{type}

which will only define the glossary if it doesn’t already exist. This also has a starred version that doesn’t automatically switch off hyperlinks.

The individual glossary displaying commands \printglossary, \printnoidxglossary and \printunsrtglossary have two extra keys:

The \newglossaryentry command has three new keys:

The test file example-glossaries-xr.tex contains dummy entries with a mixture of see, alias and seealso keys for use with minimal working examples. There are also example-glossaries-*.bib files that correspond to each example-glossaries-*.tex file for testing bib2gls.

The \longnewglossaryentry command now has a starred version (as from v1.12) that doesn’t automatically insert

\leavevmode\unskip\nopostdesc

at the end of the description field.


\longnewglossaryentry  \longnewglossaryentry*{label}{options} {description}

The descriptionplural key is left unset unless explicitly set in ⟨options⟩.

The unstarred version no longer hard-codes the above code (which removes trailing space and suppresses the post-description hook) but instead uses:


\glsxtrpostlongdescription  \glsxtrpostlongdescription

This can be redefined to allow the post-description hook to work but retain the \unskip part if required. For example:

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrpostlongdescription}{\leavevmode\unskip}

This will discarded unwanted trailing space at the end of the description but won’t suppress the post-description hook.

The unstarred version also alters the base glossaries package’s treatment of the descriptionplural key. Since a plural description doesn’t make much sense for multi-paragraph descriptions, the default behaviour with glossaries-extra’s \longnewglossaryentry is to simply leave the plural description unset unless explicitly set using the descriptionplural key. The glossaries.sty version of this command sets the description’s plural form to the same as the singular.2.1

Note that this modified unstarred version doesn’t append \glsxtrpostlongdescription to the description’s plural form.

The \newterm command (defined through the index package option) is modified so that the category defaults to index. The \newacronym command is modified to use the new abbreviation interface provided by glossaries-extra. (See §3 Abbreviations.)

The \makeglossaries command now has an optional argument.


\makeglossaries  \makeglossaries[list]

If ⟨list⟩ is empty, \makeglossaries behaves as per its original definition in the glossaries package, otherwise ⟨list⟩ can be a comma-separated list of glossaries that need processing with an external indexing application.

This command is not permitted with the record=only package option. Without the optional argument, it’s permitted with record=alsoindex. With the optional argument, it’s only permitted with the default record=off.

It should then be possible to use \printglossary for those glossaries listed in ⟨list⟩ and \printnoidxglossary for the other glossaries. (See the accompanying file sample-mixedsort.tex for an example.)

If you use the optional argument ⟨list⟩, you can’t define entries in the document (even with the docdef option).

You will need at least version 2.20 of makeglossaries or at least version 1.3 of the Lua alternative makeglossaries-lite (both distributed with glossaries v4.27) to allow for this use of \makeglossaries[list]. Alternatively, use the automake option.

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2.1 Entry Indexing

As from version 1.31, there is a new command like \glsadd where the mandatory argument is a comma-separated list of labels:


\glsaddeach  \glsaddeach[options]{list}

This simply iterates over ⟨list⟩ and does \glsadd[options]{label} for each entry in the list.

The glossaries-extra package provides extra keys for commands like \gls and \glstext:

noindex
This is a boolean key. If true, this suppresses the indexing. (That is, it prevents \gls or whatever from adding a line to the external glossary file.) This is more useful than the indexonlyfirst package option provided by glossaries, as the first use might not be the most pertinent use. (If you want to apply indexonlyfirst to selected entries, rather than all of them, you can use the indexonlyfirst attribute, see §5 Categories for further details.) Note that the noindex key isn’t available for \glsadd (and \glsaddall) since the whole purpose of that command is to index an entry.
wrgloss
(New to v1.14.) This is may only take the values before or after. By default, commands that both index and display link text (such as \gls, \glstext and \glslink), perform the indexing before the link text as the indexing creates a whatsit that can cause problems if it occurs after the link text. However, it may be that in some cases (such as long phrases) you may actually want the indexing performed after the link text. In this case you can use wrgloss=after for specific instances. Note that this option doesn’t have an effect if the indexing has been suppressed through other settings (such as noindex).

The default value is set up using


\glsxtrinitwrgloss  \glsxtrinitwrgloss

which is defined as:

\newcommand*{\glsxtrinitwrgloss}{%  
 \glsifattribute{\glslabel}{wrgloss}{after}%  
 {%  
   \glsxtrinitwrglossbeforefalse  
 }%  
 {%  
   \glsxtrinitwrglossbeforetrue  
 }%  
}

This sets the conditional


\ifglsxtrinitwrglossbefore  \ifglsxtrinitwrgloss

which is used to determine where to perform the indexing.

This means you can set the wrgloss attribute to after to automatically use this as the default for entries with that category attribute. (Note that adding wrgloss to the default options in \GlsXtrSetDefaultGlsOpts will override \glsxtrinitwrgloss.)

hyperoutside
(New to v1.21.) This is a boolean key. The default is hyperoutside=true, which puts the hyperlink outside \glstextformat, so that commands like \gls will effectively do
\hyperlink{target}{\glstextformat{link text}}
This is the same behaviour as with the base glossaries package. With hyperoutside=false, \hyperlink is placed inside the argument of \glstextformat:
\glstextformat{\hyperlink{target}{link text}}
You can use the hyperoutside category attribute to set the default for a given category. This can be combined with the use of the textformat attribute to counteract any interference caused by \hyperlink. For example:
\glssetcategoryattribute{mathrelation}{hyperoutside}{false}

will set hyperoutside=false for all entries that are assigned to the category mathrelation and

\glssetcategoryattribute{mathrelation}{textformat}{mathrel}

will use \mathrel instead of \glstextformat resulting in:

\mathrel{\hyperlink{target}{link text}}
for entries with the category key set to mathrelation.
textformat
This key must have a control sequence name as its value. The command formed from this name must exist and must take one argument. (Use relax for default behaviour.) If set, this overrides the textformat attribute and \glstextformat. See the soul example in §2.5 Unsetting the First Use Flag.
prefix
Locally redefines \glolinkprefix to the given value. It should match the prefix for the desired glossary.

There is a new hook that’s used each time indexing information is written to the external glossary files:


\glsxtrdowrglossaryhook  \glsxtrdowrglossaryhook{label}

where ⟨label⟩ is the entry’s label. This does nothing by default but may be redefined. (See, for example, the accompanying sample file sample-indexhook.tex, which uses this hook to determine which entries haven’t been indexed.)

There’s also a new hook (from v1.26) that’s used immediately before the options are set by the \gls-like and \glstext-like commands:


\glslinkpresetkeys  \glslinkpresetkeys

(The base package provides \glslinkpostsetkeys that’s used immediately after the options are set.)

As from version 1.30 there are also similar hooks for \glsadd:


\glsaddpresetkeys  \glsaddpresetkeys

and


\glsaddpostsetkeys  \glsaddpostsetkeys

For example, to default to using the equation counter in maths mode:

\renewcommand{\glslinkpresetkeys}{%  
 \ifmmode \setkeys{glslink}{counter=equation}\fi}  
\renewcommand{\glsaddpresetkeys}{%  
 \ifmmode \setkeys{glossadd}{counter=equation}\fi}

(This can be overridden with an explicit use of counter in the optional argument of \gls or \glsadd.) Alternatively, to enforce this (overriding the option argument):

\renewcommand{\glslinkpostsetkeys}{%  
 \ifmmode \setkeys{glslink}{counter=equation}\fi}  
\renewcommand{\glsaddpostsetkeys}{%  
 \ifmmode \setkeys{glossadd}{counter=equation}\fi}

As from version 1.14, there are two new keys for \glsadd: thevalue and theHvalue. These keys are designed for manually adding explicit locations rather than obtaining the value from the associated counter. As from version 1.19, these two keys are also available for commands like \gls and \glslink. The thevalue keys is intended primarily for adding locations in supplementary material that can’t be obtained from a counter.

The principle key thevalue is for the location value. The other key theHvalue can be used to extract a prefix value for the first argument of commands like \glsnoidxdisplayloc. It’s value must be in the format ⟨prefix⟩⟨location⟩. In general, there’s little need for this key as the prefix is typically associated with a counter that can be used to form hypertargets.

If you use thevalue, you must make sure that you use an indexing application that will accept the given value.

For example, makeindex will only accept locations in the form [⟨num⟩⟨sep⟩]*⟨num⟩ where ⟨num⟩ is an arabic number (0, 1, …), roman numeral (i, ii, … or I, II, …) or a character from a, …, z or A, …, Z, and [⟨num⟩⟨sep⟩]* indicates zero or more instances of a number followed by the recognised separator character (set with \glsSetCompositor). This means that makeindex won’t accept, for example,

\glsadd[thevalue={Supplementary Material}]{sample}

This location value will be accepted by bib2gls, since it will allow any location and will only try forming ranges if the location matches any of its numerical patterns. In the case of xindy, you’ll need to add a rule that can match the value. If you’re using hyperref, you may need to use the format key to prevent a hyperlink if one can’t naturally be formed from the prefix, counter and location value.

For example, suppose the file suppl.tex contains:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\newglossaryentry{sample}{name={sample},description={an example}}  
\renewcommand{\thepage}{S.\arabic{page}}  
\begin{document}  
First page.  
\newpage  
\gls{sample}.  
\end{document}

This has an entry on page S.2. Suppose another document wants to include this location in the glossary. Then this can be done by setting thevalue to S.2. For example:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\makeglossaries  
\newglossaryentry{sample}{name={sample},description={an example}}  
\begin{document}  
Some \gls{sample} text.  
\printglossaries  
\glsadd[thevalue={S.2}]{sample}  
\end{document}

This location value will be accepted by makeindex as it’s in the form ⟨num⟩⟨sep⟩⟨num⟩.

If you want hyperlinks, things are more complicated. First you need to set the externallocation to the location of the PDF file. For example:

\glssetcategoryattribute{supplemental}{externallocation}{suppl.pdf}  
\newglossaryentry{sample}{category=supplemental,  
 name={sample},description={an example}}

Next you need to add glsxtrsupphypernumber as the format:

\glsadd[thevalue={S.2},format=glsxtrsupphypernumber]{sample}

Both documents will need to use the hyperref package. Remember that the counter used for the location also needs to match. If \theHcounter⟩ is defined in the other document and doesn’t match in the referencing document, then you need to use theHvalue to set the appropriate value. See the accompanying sample files sample-suppl-hyp.tex and sample-suppl-main-hyp.tex for an example that uses hyperref.

The hyperlink for the supplementary location may or may not take you to the relevant place in the external PDF file depending on your PDF viewer. Some may not support external links, and some may take you to the first page or last visited page.

For example, if both sample-suppl-hyp.pdf and sample-suppl-main-hyp.pdf are in the same directory, then viewing sample-suppl-main-hyp.pdf in Evince will take you to the correct location in the linked document (when you click on the S.2 external link), but Okular will take you to the top of the first page of the linked document.

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2.2 Cross-References (“see” and “see also”)

The value of the see key is now saved as a field. This isn’t the case with glossaries, where the see value is simply used to directly write a line to the corresponding glossary file and is then discarded. This is why the see key can’t be used before \makeglossaries (since the file hasn’t been opened yet). It’s also the reason why the see key doesn’t have any effect when used in entries that are defined in the document environment. Since the value isn’t saved, it’s not available when the .glsdefs file is created at the end of the document and so isn’t available at the start of the document environment on the next run.

This modification allows glossaries-extra to provide


\glsxtraddallcrossrefs  \glsxtraddallcrossrefs

which is used at the end of the document to automatically add any unused cross-references unless the package option indexcrossrefs was set to false.

As a by-product of this enhancement, the see key will now work for entries defined in the document environment, but it’s still best to define entries in the preamble, and the see key still can’t perform any indexing before the file has been opened by \makeglossaries. Note that glossaries v4.24 introduced the seenoindex package option, which can be used to suppress the error when the see key is used before \makeglossaries, so seenoindex=ignore will allow the see value to be stored even though it may not be possible to index it at that point.

As from version 1.06, you can display the cross-referenced information for a given entry using


\glsxtrusesee  \glsxtrusesee{label}

This internally uses


\glsxtruseseeformat  \glsxtruseseeformat{tag}{xr list}

where ⟨tag⟩ and ⟨xr list⟩ are obtained from the value of the entry’s see field (if non-empty). By default, this just does \glsseeformat[tag]{xr list}{}, which is how the cross-reference is displayed in the number list. Note that \glsxtrusesee does nothing if the see field hasn’t been set for the entry given by ⟨label⟩.

Suppose you want to suppress the number list using nonumberlist. This will automatically prevent the cross-references from being displayed. The seeautonumberlist package option will automatically enable the number list for entries that have the see key set, but this will also show the rest of the number list.

Another approach in this situation is to use the post description hook with \glsxtrusesee to append the cross-reference after the description. For example:

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrpostdescgeneral}{%  
 \ifglshasfield{see}{\glscurrententrylabel}  
 {, \glsxtrusesee{\glscurrententrylabel}}%  
 {}%  
}

Now the cross-references can appear even though the number list has been suppressed.

As from v1.16, there’s a separate seealso key. Unlike see, this doesn’t have an optional part for the textual tag. The syntax seealso={xr-labels} works in much the same way as using see=[\seealsoname]{xr-labels} but the information is stored in a separate field. If you need a different tag, use the see key instead (or redefine \seealsoname or \glsxtruseseealsoformat, described below).

You can display the formatted list of cross-references stored in the seealso key using:


\glsxtruseseealso  \glsxtruseseealso{label}

This works in much the same way as \glsxtrusesee but it internally uses


\glsxtruseseeformat  \glsxtruseseealsoformat{xr list}

For example:

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrpostdescgeneral}{%  
 \ifglshasfield{see}{\glscurrententrylabel}  
 {, \glsxtrusesee{\glscurrententrylabel}}%  
 {}%  
 \ifglshasfield{seealso}{\glscurrententrylabel}  
 { (\glsxtruseseealso{\glscurrententrylabel})}%  
 {}%  
}

The actual unformatted comma-separated list ⟨xr-list⟩ stored in the seealso field can be accessed with:


\glsxtrseealsolabels  \glsxtrseealsolabels{label}

This will just expand to the ⟨xr-labels⟩ provided in the value of the seealso key. There’s no corresponding command to access the see field. If you really need to access it, you can use commands like \glsxtrfielduse, but remember that it may start with [tag], so it can’t be automatically treated as a simple comma-separated list.

The base glossaries package provides \glsseelist, which requires a comma-separated list of labels as the argument. The argument isn’t fully expanded, so it’s not suitable to use, for example, \glsxtrseealsolabels{label} as the argument. For convenience, glossaries-extra provides


\glsxtrseelist  \glsxtrseelist{xr list}

which fully expands its argument and passes it to \glsseelist.

The seealso key implements the automatic indexing using


\glsxtrindexseealso  \glsxtrindexseealso{label}{xr list}

which just does

\glssee[\seealsoname]{label}{xr list}
unless the xindy option is used with glossaries v4.30+, in which case a distinct seealso cross-reference class is used instead.

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2.3 Entry Display Style Modifications

Recall from the glossaries package that commands such as \gls display text at that point in the document (optionally with a hyperlink to the relevant line in the glossary). This text is referred to as the “link-text” regardless of whether or not it actually has a hyperlink. The actual text and the way it’s displayed depends on the command used (such as \gls) and the entry format.

The default entry format (\glsentryfmt) used in the link-text by commands like \gls, \glsxtrfull, \glsxtrshort and \glsxtrlong (but not commands like \glslink, \glsfirst and \glstext) is changed by glossaries-extra to test for regular entries, which are determined as follows:

This means that entries with a short form can be treated as regular entries rather than abbreviations if it’s more appropriate for the desired style.

As from version 1.04, \glsentryfmt now puts \glsgenentry in the argument of the new command


\glsxtrregularfont  \glsxtrregularfont{text}

This just does its argument ⟨text⟩ by default. This means that if you want regular entries in a different font but don’t want that font to apply to abbreviations, then you can redefine \glsxtrregularfont. This is more precise than changing \glstextformat which is applied to all linking commands for all entries, unless overridden by the textformat attribute.

For example:

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrregularfont}[1]{\textsf{#1}}

You can access the label through \glslabel. For example, you can query the category:

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrregularfont}[1]{%  
 \glsifcategory{\glslabel}{general}{\textsf{#1}}{#1}}

or query the category attribute, for example, provide a custom attribute called font:

\glssetcategoryattribute{general}{font}{sf}  
\renewcommand*{\glsxtrregularfont}[1]{%  
 \glsifattribute{\glslabel}{font}{sf}{\textsf{#1}}{#1}}

As from version 1.21, it’s simpler to just do, for example:

\glssetcategoryattribute{general}{textformat}{textsf}

without redefining \glsxtrregularfont.

As from version 1.30, there is also a command for abbreviations that encapsulates \glsxtrgenabbrvfmt:


\glsxtrabbreviationfont  \glsxtrabbreviationfont{text}

This also just does its argument by default. Font changes made by abbreviation styles are within ⟨text⟩.

The \glspostlinkhook provided by the glossaries package to insert information after the link-text produced by commands like \gls and \glstext is redefined to


\glsxtrpostlinkhook  \glsxtrpostlinkhook

This command will discard a following full stop (period) if the discardperiod attribute is set to “true” for the current entry’s category. It will also do


\glsxtrpostlink  \glsxtrpostlink

if a full stop hasn’t be discarded and


\glsxtrpostlinkendsentence  \glsxtrpostlinkendsentence

if a full stop has been discarded.

It may be that you want to check some other setting (rather than a category attribute) to determine whether or not to discard a following full stop. In which case you can redefine:


\glsxtrifcustomdiscardperiod  \glsxtrifcustomdiscardperiod{true} {false}

You can access the field’s label using \glslabel. This command should do ⟨true⟩ if the post-link hook should check if a period follows and ⟨false⟩ otherwise. The default definition is simply:

\newcommand*{\glsxtrifcustomdiscardperiod}[2]{#2}

which means that no additional checks are performed. (Only the recognised category attributes will be checked.)

Avoid the use of \gls-like and \glstext-like commands within the post-link hook as they will cause interference. Consider using commands like \glsentrytext, \glsaccesstext or \glsxtrp (§2.7 Nested Links) instead.

By default \glsxtrpostlink just does \glsxtrpostlinkcategory if it exists, where ⟨category⟩ is the category label for the current entry. (For example, for the general category, \glsxtrpostlinkgeneral if it has been defined.)

You can define the post-link hook command using \newcommand, for example:

\newcommand*{\glsxtrpostlinkgeneral}{%  
 \glsxtrpostlinkAddDescOnFirstUse  
}

or, as from v1.31, you can use


\glsdefpostlink  \glsdefpostlink{category}{definition}

This is simply a shortcut for:

\csdefglsxtrpostlinkcategory{definition}
Note that it doesn’t check if the command has already been defined.

The sentence-ending hook is slightly more complicated. If the command \glsxtrpostlinkcategory is defined the hook will do that and then insert a full stop with the space factor adjusted to match the end of sentence. If \glsxtrpostlinkcategory hasn’t been defined, the space factor is adjusted to match the end of sentence. This means that if you have, for example, an entry that ends with a full stop, a redundant following full stop will be discarded and the space factor adjusted (in case the entry is in uppercase) unless the entry is followed by additional material, in which case the following full stop is no longer redundant and needs to be reinserted.

There are some convenient commands you might want to use when customizing the post-link-text category hooks:


\glsxtrpostlinkAddDescOnFirstUse  \glsxtrpostlinkAddDescOnFirstUse

This will add the description in parentheses on first use.

For example, suppose you want to append the description in parentheses on first use for entries in the symbol category:

\newcommand*{\glsxtrpostlinksymbol}{%  
  \glsxtrpostlinkAddDescOnFirstUse  
}


\glsxtrpostlinkAddSymbolOnFirstUse  \glsxtrpostlinkAddSymbolOnFirstUse

This will append the symbol (if defined) in parentheses on first use. (Does nothing if the symbol hasn’t been set.)


\glsxtrpostlinkAddSymbolDescOnFirstUse  \glsxtrpostlinkAddSymbolDescOnFirstUse

(New to v1.31.) On first use, this will append \space(⟨symbol⟩, ⟨description⟩) if the symbol is defined otherwise it just appends \space(⟨description⟩).

If you want to provide your own custom format be aware that you can’t use \ifglsused within the post-link-text hook as by this point the first use flag will have been unset. Instead you can use


\glsxtrifwasfirstuse  \glsxtrifwasfirstuse{true}{false}

This will do ⟨true⟩ if the last used entry was the first use for that entry, otherwise it will do ⟨false⟩. (Requires at least glossaries v4.19 to work properly.) This command is locally set by commands like \gls, so don’t rely on it outside of the post-link-text hook.

Note that commands like \glsfirst and \glsxtrfull fake first use for the benefit of the post-link-text hooks by setting \glsxtrifwasfirstuse to \@firstoftwo. (Although, depending on the styles in use, they may not exactly match the text produced by \gls-like commands on first use.) However, the short-postfootnote style alters \glsxtrfull so that it fakes non-first use otherwise the inline full format would include the footnote, which is inappropriate.

For example, if you want to place the description in a footnote after the link-text on first use for the general category:

\newcommand*{\glsxtrpostlinkgeneral}{%  
  \glsxtrifwasfirstuse{\footnote{\glsentrydesc{\glslabel}}}{}%  
}

The short-postfootnote abbreviation style uses the post-link-text hook to place the footnote after trailing punctuation characters.

You can set the default options used by \glslink, \gls etc with:


\GlsXtrSetDefaultGlsOpts  \GlsXtrSetDefaultGlsOpts{options}

For example, if you mostly don’t want to index entries then you can do:

\GlsXtrSetDefaultGlsOpts{noindex}

and then use, for example, \gls[noindex=false]{sample} when you actually want the location added to the number list. These defaults may be overridden by other settings (such as category attributes) in addition to any settings passed in the option argument of commands like \glslink and \gls.

Note that if you don’t want any indexing, just omit \makeglossaries and \printglossaries (or analogous commands). If you want to adjust the default for wrgloss, it’s better to do this by redefining \glsxtrinitwrgloss instead.

\GlsXtrSetDefaultGlsOpts doesn’t affect \glsadd.

If you want to change the default value of format, you can instead use:


\GlsXtrSetDefaultNumberFormat{format}

This has the advantage of also working for \glsadd. For example, if you want all locations in the back matter to appear in italic (unless explicitly overridden):

\backmatter  
\GlsXtrSetDefaultNumberFormat{hyperit}

Commands like \gls have star (*) and plus (+) modifiers as a short cut for hyper=false and hyper=true. The glossaries-extra package provides a way to add a third modifier, if required, using


\GlsXtrSetAltModifier  \GlsXtrSetAltModifier{char}{options}

where ⟨char⟩ is the character used as the modifier and ⟨options⟩ is the default set of options (which may be overridden). Note that ⟨char⟩ must be a single character (not a UTF-8 character, unless you are using XƎLATEX or LuaLATEX).

When choosing the character ⟨char⟩ take care of any changes in category code.

Example:

\GlsXtrSetAltModifier{!}{noindex}

This means that \gls!{sample} will be equivalent to \gls[noindex]{sample}. It’s not possible to mix modifiers. For example, if you want to do

\gls[noindex,hyper=false]{sample}

you can use \gls*[noindex]{sample} or \gls![hyper=false]{sample} but you can’t combine the * and ! modifiers.

Location lists displayed with \printnoidxglossary internally use


\glsnoidxdisplayloc  \glsnoidxdisplayloc{prefix}{counter}{format} {location}

This command is provided by glossaries, but is modified by glossaries-extra to check for the start and end range formation identifiers ( and ) which are discarded to obtain the actual control sequence name that forms the location formatting command.

If the range identifiers aren’t present, this just uses


\glsxtrdisplaysingleloc  \glsxtrdisplaysingleloc{format}{location}

otherwise it uses


\glsxtrdisplaystartloc  \glsxtrdisplaystartloc{format}{location}

for the start of a range (where the identifier has been stripped from ⟨format⟩) or


\glsxtrdisplayendloc  \glsxtrdisplayendloc{format}{location}

for the end of a range (where the identifier has been stripped from ⟨format⟩).

By default the start range command saves the format in


\glsxtrlocrangefmt  \glsxtrlocrangefmt

and does
\glsxtrdisplaysingleloc{format}{location}
(If the format is empty, it will be replaced with glsnumberformat.)

The end command checks that the format matches the start of the range, does


\glsxtrdisplayendlochook  \glsxtrdisplayendlochook{format}{location}

(which does nothing by default), followed by
\glsxtrdisplaysingleloc{format}{location}
and then sets \glsxtrlocrangefmt to empty.

This means that the list

\glsnoidxdisplayloc{}{page}{(textbf}{1},  
\glsnoidxdisplayloc{}{page}{textbf}{1},  
\glsnoidxdisplayloc{}{page}{)textbf}{1}.

doesn’t display any differently from

\glsnoidxdisplayloc{}{page}{textbf}{1},  
\glsnoidxdisplayloc{}{page}{textbf}{1},  
\glsnoidxdisplayloc{}{page}{textbf}{1}.

but it does make it easier to define your own custom list handler that can accommodate the ranges.

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2.4 Entry Counting Modifications

If you are using bib2gls you may find it more convenient to use the record count commands described in §9 bib2gls: Managing Reference Databases instead.

The \glsenableentrycount command is modified to allow for the entrycount attribute. This means that you not only need to enable entry counting with \glsenableentrycount, but you also need to set the appropriate attribute (see §5 Categories).

For example, instead of just doing:

\glsenableentrycount

you now need to do:

\glsenableentrycount  
\glssetcategoryattribute{abbreviation}{entrycount}{1}

This will enable the entry counting for entries in the abbreviation category, but any entries assigned to other categories will be unchanged.

Further information about entry counting, including the new per-unit feature, is described in §6.1 Entry Counting (First Use Flag).

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2.5 Unsetting the First Use Flag

There are two new commands provided with version 1.31+:


\glslocalreseteach  \glslocalreseteach{list}

and


\glslocalunseteach  \glslocalunseteach{list}

These behave like \glslocalreset and \glslocalunset but the argument is a comma-separated list of labels.

The internal command used by \glsunset is modified first to allow for the changing in entry counting, described above, but also to allow for buffering pending unsets when commands like \gls are used in a context where changing a boolean variable can cause things to go wrong. One example of this is using \gls in one of the commands provided with the package. For example:

\ul{Some text about \gls{html}.}

This causes the confusing error:

Glossary entry `{html}' has not been defined.

The simplest workaround is to put \gls{html} inside the argument of \mbox. For example:

\ul{Some text about \mbox{\gls{html}}.}

This can work provided it’s not the first use of this entry. It if is, then unsetting the first use flag causes a problem and results in the error:

! Package soul Error: Reconstruction failed.

The glossaries-extra package provides a way of temporarily switching off \glsunset so that it just makes a note of the entry’s label but doesn’t actually perform the change:


\GlsXtrStartUnsetBuffering  \GlsXtrStartUnsetBuffering

The unstarred version doesn’t check for duplicates, so the internal list may end up with multiple occurrences of the same label. The starred version only adds a label to the internal list if it’s not already in it. Note that this buffering only applies to the global \glsunset and does not affect the local \glslocalunset.

Later you can restore \glsunset and unset all buffered labels using:


\GlsXtrStopUnsetBuffering  \GlsXtrStopUnsetBuffering

The starred form \GlsXtrStopUnsetBuffering* uses \glslocalunset instead. For example:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}  
\usepackage{soul}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\newabbreviation{html}{HTML}{hypertext markup language}  
\begin{document}  
\GlsXtrStartUnsetBuffering  
\ul{Some text about \mbox{\gls{html}}.}  
\GlsXtrStopUnsetBuffering  
Next use: \gls{html}.  
\end{document}

Before you stop the unset buffering, you can iterate over the current buffer using


\GlsXtrForUnsetBufferedList  \GlsXtrForUnsetBufferedList{cs}

where ⟨cs⟩ is a control sequence that takes a single argument (which is the entry label). This is best used with the starred version \GlsXtrStartUnsetBuffering* to avoid duplicates.

Note that since the change in the first use flag now doesn’t occur until \GlsXtrStopUnsetBuffering, multiple references of the same term within the buffering zone will always be treated as first use (if the term wasn’t used before the buffering started).

There can still be a problem here as content within \mbox can’t break across a line so you may end up with an overfull line or excessive white space within the paragraph.

An alternative is to use \protect:

\GlsXtrStartUnsetBuffering  
\ul{Some text about \protect\gls{html}.}  
\GlsXtrStopUnsetBuffering

but the formatting (underlining in this example) won’t be applied. Another possibility is:

\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}  
\usepackage{soul}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\newabbreviation{html}{HTML}{hypertext markup language}  
\newrobustcmd{\gul}[1]{%  
  {%  
   \def\glsxtrabbreviationfont##1{\GlsXtrExpandedFmt{\ul}{##1}}%  
   \def\glsxtrregularfont##1{\GlsXtrExpandedFmt{\ul}{##1}}%  
   #1%  
  }%  
}  
\begin{document}  
\ul{Some text about }\gls[textformat=gul]{html}.  
Next use: \gls{html}.  
\end{document}

This moves \gls outside of \ul and uses textformat to locally change the formatting command used by \gls (which is normally given by \glstextformat or the textformat attribute) to a custom command \gul, which locally changes the regular font and the default abbreviation font to use \ul. It then uses


\GlsXtrExpandedFmt  \GlsXtrExpandedFmt{cs}{text}

which (protected) fully expands ⟨text⟩ before applying ⟨cs⟩, which must be a control sequence that takes a single argument. This allows \ul to move much further inside and increases its chances of working. It can still break if ⟨text⟩ expands to something that \ul can’t deal with. For example, if an abbreviation style is used that contains complex formatting or if the field value contains problematic content.

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2.6 Plurals

Some languages, such as English, have a general rule that plurals are formed from the singular with a suffix appended. This isn’t an absolute rule. There are plenty of exceptions (for example, geese, children, churches, elves, fairies, sheep). The glossaries package allows the plural key to be optional when defining entries. In some cases a plural may not make any sense (for example, the term is a symbol) and in some cases the plural may be identical to the singular.

To make life easier for languages where the majority of plurals can simply be formed by appending a suffix to the singular, the glossaries package lets the plural field default to the value of the text field with \glspluralsuffix appended. This command is defined to be just the letter “s”. This means that the majority of terms don’t need to have the plural supplied as well, and you only need to use it for the exceptions.

For languages that don’t have this general rule, the plural field will always need to be supplied, where needed.

There are other plural fields, such as firstplural, longplural and shortplural. Again, if you are using a language that doesn’t have a simple suffix rule, you’ll have to supply the plural forms if you need them (and if a plural makes sense in the context).

If these fields are omitted, the glossaries package follows these rules:

This last case is changed with glossaries-extra. With this extension package, the shortplural field defaults to the short field with \abbrvpluralsuffix appended unless overridden by category attributes. This suffix command is set by the abbreviation styles. This means that every time an abbreviation style is implemented, \abbrvpluralsuffix is redefined. In most cases its redefined to use


\glsxtrabbrvpluralsuffix  \glsxtrabbrvpluralsuffix

which defaults to just \glspluralsuffix. Some of the abbreviation styles have their own command for the plural suffix, such as \glsxtrscsuffix, so if you want to completely strip all the plural suffixes used for abbreviations then you need to redefine \glsxtrabbrvpluralsuffix not \abbrvpluralsuffix, which changes with the style. Redefining \acrpluralsuffix will have no affect, since it’s not used by the new abbreviation mechanism.

If you require a mixture (for example, in a multilingual document), there are two attributes that affect the short plural suffix formation. The first is aposplural which uses the suffix

'\abbrvpluralsuffix

That is, an apostrophe followed by \abbrvpluralsuffix is appended. The second attribute is noshortplural which suppresses the suffix and simply sets shortplural to the same as short.

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2.7 Nested Links

Complications arise when you use \gls in the value of the name field (or text or first fields, if set). This tends to occur with abbreviations that extend other abbreviations. For example, SHTML is an abbreviation for SSI enabled HTML, where SSI is an abbreviation for Server Side Includes and HTML is an abbreviation for Hypertext Markup Language.

Things can go wrong if we try the following with the glossaries package:

\newacronym{ssi}{SSI}{Server Side Includes}  
\newacronym{html}{HTML}{Hypertext Markup Language}  
\newacronym{shtml}{S\gls{html}}{\gls{ssi} enabled \gls{html}}

The main problems are:

  1. The first letter upper casing commands, such as \Gls, won’t work for the shtml entry on first use if the long form is displayed before the short form (which is the default abbreviation style). This will attempt to do
    \gls{\uppercase ssi} enabled \gls{html}

    which just doesn’t work. Grouping the \gls{ssi} doesn’t work either as this will effectively try to do

    \uppercase{\gls{ssi}} enabled \gls{html}

    This will upper case the label ssi so the entry won’t be recognised. This problem will also occur if you use the all capitals version, such as \GLS.

  2. The long and abbreviated forms accessed through \glsentrylong and \glsentryshort are no longer expandable and so can’t be used be used in contexts that require this, such as PDF bookmarks.
  3. The nested commands may end up in the sort key, which will confuse the indexing.
  4. The shtml entry produces inconsistent results depending on whether the ssi or html entries have been used. Suppose both ssi and html are used before shtml. For example:
    This section discusses \gls{ssi}, \gls{html} and \gls{shtml}.

    This produces:

    This section discusses server side includes (SSI), hypertext markup language (HTML) and SSI enabled HTML (SHTML).

    So the first use of the shtml entry produces “SSI enabled HTML (SHTML)”.

    Now let’s suppose the html entry is used before the shtml but the ssi entry is used after the shtml entry, for example:

    The sample files are either \gls{html} or \gls{shtml}, but let's  
    first discuss \gls{ssi}.

    This produces:

    The sample files are either hypertext markup language (HTML) or server side includes (SSI) enabled HTML (SHTML), but let’s first discuss SSI.

    So the first use of the shtml entry now produces “server side includes (SSI) enabled HTML (SHTML)”, which looks a bit strange.

    Now let’s suppose the shtml entry is used before (or without) the other two entries:

    This article is an introduction to \gls{shtml}.

    This produces:

    This article is an introduction to server side includes (SSI) enabled hypertext markup language (HTML) (SHTML).

    So the first use of the shtml entry now produces “server side includes (SSI) enabled hypertext markup language (HTML) (SHTML)”, which is even more strange.

    This is all aggravated by setting the style using the glossaries package’s \setacronymstyle. For example:

    \setacronymstyle{long-short}

    as this references the label through the use of \glslabel when displaying the long and short forms, but this value changes with each use of \gls, so instead of displaying “(SHTML)” at the end of the first use, it now displays “(HTML)”, since \glslabel has been changed to html by \gls{html}.

    Another oddity occurs if you reset the html entry between uses of the shtml entry. For example:

    \gls{shtml} ... \glsreset{html}\gls{shtml}

    The next use of shtml produces “Shypertext markup language (HTML)”, which is downright weird.

    Even without this, the short form has nested formatting commands, which amount to \acronymfont{S\acronymfont{HTML}}. This may not be a problem for some styles, but if you use one of the “sm” styles (that use \textsmaller), this will produce an odd result.

  5. Each time the shtml entry is used, the html entry will also be indexed and marked as used, and on first use this will happen to both the ssi and html entries. This kind of duplication in the location list isn’t usually particularly helpful to the reader.
  6. If hyperref is in use, you’ll get nested hyperlinks and there’s no consistent way of dealing with this across the available PDF viewers. If on the first use case, the user clicks on the “HTML” part of the “SSI enabled HTML (SHTML)” link, they may be directed to the HTML entry in the glossary or they may be directed to the SHTML entry in the glossary.

For these reasons it’s better to use the simple expandable commands like \glsentrytext or \glsentryshort in the definition of other entries (although that doesn’t fix the first problem). Alternatively use something like:

\newacronym  
 [description={\acrshort{ssi} enabled \acrshort{html}}]  
 {shtml}{SHTML}{SSI enabled HTML}

with glossaries or:

\newabbreviation  
 [description={\glsxtrshort{ssi} enabled \glsxtrshort{html}}]  
 {shtml}{SHTML}{SSI enabled HTML}

with glossaries-extra. This fixes all the above listed problems (as long as you don’t use \glsdesc). Note that replacing \gls with \acrshort in the original example may fix the first use issue, but it doesn’t fix any of the other problems listed above.

If it’s simply that you want to use the abbreviation font, you can use \glsabbrvfont:

\setabbreviationstyle{long-short-sc}  
\newabbreviation{ssi}{ssi}{server-side includes}  
\newabbreviation{html}{html}{hypertext markup language}  
\newabbreviation{shtml}{shtml}{\glsabbrvfont{ssi} enabled  
\glsabbrvfont{html}}

This will pick up the font style setting of the outer entry (shtml, in the above case). This isn’t a problem in the above example as all the abbreviations use the same style.

However if you’re really determined to use \gls in a field that may be included within some link-text, glossaries-extra patches internals used by the linking commands so that if \gls (or plural or case changing variants) occurs in the link-text it will behave as though you used \glstext[hyper=false,noindex] instead. Grouping is also added so that, for example, when \gls{shtml} is used for the first time the long form

\gls{ssi} enabled \gls{html}

is treated as

{\glstext[hyper=false,noindex]{ssi}} enabled  
{\glstext[hyper=false,noindex]{html}}

This overcomes problems 4, 5 and 6 listed above, but still doesn’t fix problems 1 and 2. Problem 3 usually won’t be an issue as most abbreviation styles set the sort key to the short form, so using these commands in the long form but not the short form will only affect entries with a style that sorts according to the long form (such as long-noshort-desc).

Additionally, any instance of the long form commands, such as \glsxtrlong or \acrlong will be temporarily redefined to just use

{\glsentrylong{label}insert}
(or case-changing versions). Similarly the short form commands, such as \glsxtrshort or \acrshort will use \glsentryshort in the argument of either \glsabbrvfont (for \glsxtrshort) or \acronymfont (for \acrshort). So if the shtml entry had instead been defined as:
\newacronym{shtml}{SHTML}{\acrshort{ssi} enabled \acrshort{html}}

then (using the long-short style) the first use will be like

{\acronymfont{\glsentryshort{ssi}}} enabled  
{\acronymfont{\glsentryshort{html}}} (SHTML)

whereas if the entry is defined as:

\newabbreviation{shtml}{SHTML}{\glsxtrshort{ssi} enabled  
\glsxtrshort{html}}

then the first use will be like:

{\glsabbrvfont{\glsentryshort{ssi}}} enabled  
{\glsabbrvfont{\glsentryshort{html}}} (SHTML)

Note that the first optional argument of \acrshort or \glsxtrshort is ignored in this context. (The final optional argument will be inserted, if present.) The abbreviation style that governs \glsabbrvfont will be set for \glsxtrshort. Note that \acrshort doesn’t set the abbreviation style.

Alternatively you can use:


\glsxtrp  \glsxtrp{field}{label}

where ⟨field⟩ is the field label and corresponds to a command in the form \glsfield⟩ (e.g. \glstext) or in the form \glsxtrfield⟩ (e.g. \glsxtrshort).

There’s a shortcut command for the most common fields:


\glsps  \glsps{label}

which is equivalent to \glsxtrp{short}{label}, and


\glspt  \glspt{label}

which is equivalent to \glsxtrp{text}{label}.

The \glsxtrp command behaves much like the \glsfmtfield⟩ commands described in §4 Entries in Sectioning Titles, Headers, Captions and Contents but the post-link hook is also suppressed and extra grouping is added. It automatically sets hyper to false and noindex to true. If you want to change this, you can use


\glsxtrsetpopts  \glsxtrsetpopts{options}

For example:

\glsxtrsetpopts{hyper=false}

will just switch off the hyperlinks but not the indexing. Be careful using this command or you can end up back to the original problem of nested links.

The hyper link is re-enabled within glossaries. This is done through the command:


\glossxtrsetpopts  \glossxtrsetpopts

which by default just does

\glsxtrsetpopts{noindex}

You can redefine this if you want to adjust the setting when \glsxtrp is used in the glossary. For example:

\renewcommand{\glossxtrsetpopts}{\glsxtrsetpopts{noindex=false}}

For example,

\glsxtrp{short}{ssi}

is equivalent to

{\let\glspostlinkhook\relax  
 \glsxtrshort[hyper=false,noindex]{ssi}[]%  
}

in the main body of the document or

{\let\glspostlinkhook\relax  
 \glsxtrshort[noindex]{ssi}[]%  
}

inside the glossary. (Note the post-link hook is locally disabled.)

If \glsxtrp{short}{ssi} occurs in a sectioning mark, it’s equivalent to

{\glsxtrheadshort{ssi}}

(which recognises the headuc attribute.)

If hyperref has been loaded, then the bookmark will use \glsentryfield⟩ (\glsentryshort{ssi} in the above example).

There are similar commands


\Glsxtrp  \Glsxtrp{field}{label}

for first letter upper case and


\Glsxtrp  \GLSxtrp{field}{label}

for all upper case.

If you use any of the case-changing commands, such as \Gls or \Glstext, (either all caps or first letter upper casing) don’t use any of the linking commands, such as \gls or \glstext, in the definition of entries for any of the fields that may be used by those case-changing commands.

You can, with care, protect against issue 1 by inserting an empty group at the start if the long form starts with a command that breaks the first letter uppercasing commands like \Gls, but you still won’t be able to use the all caps commands, such as \GLS.

If you really need nested commands, the safest method is

\newabbreviation{shtml}{shtml}{{}\glsxtrp{short}{ssi} enabled  
\glsxtrp{short}{html}}

but be aware that it may have some unexpected results occasionally.

Example document:

\documentclass{report}  
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}  
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}  
\usepackage{slantsc}  
\usepackage[colorlinks]{hyperref}  
\usepackage[nopostdot=false]{glossaries-extra}  
\makeglossaries  
\setabbreviationstyle{long-short-sc}  
\newabbreviation{ssi}{ssi}{server-side includes}  
\newabbreviation{html}{html}{hypertext markup language}  
\newabbreviation{shtml}{shtml}{{}\glsps{ssi} enabled {}\glsps{html}}  
\pagestyle{headings}  
\glssetcategoryattribute{abbreviation}{headuc}{true}  
\glssetcategoryattribute{abbreviation}{glossdesc}{title}  
\begin{document}  
\tableofcontents  
\chapter{\glsfmtfull{shtml}}  
First use: \gls{shtml}, \gls{ssi} and \gls{html}.  
Next use: \gls{shtml}, \gls{ssi} and \gls{html}.  
\newpage  
Next page.  
\printglossaries  
\end{document}

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2.8 Acronym Style Modifications

The glossaries-extra package provides a new way of dealing with abbreviations and redefines \newacronym to use \newabbreviation (see §3 Abbreviations). The simplest way to update a document that uses \newacronym from glossaries to glossaries-extra is do just add

\setabbreviationstyle[acronym]{long-short}

before you define any entries. For example, the following document using just glossaries

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[acronym,nopostdot,toc]{glossaries}  
\makeglossaries  
\setacronymstyle{long-short}  
\newacronym{html}{HTML}{hypertext markup language}  
\begin{document}  
\gls{html}  
\printglossaries  
\end{document}

can be easily adapted to use glossaries-extra:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[acronym]{glossaries-extra}  
\makeglossaries  
\setabbreviationstyle[acronym]{long-short}  
\newacronym{html}{HTML}{hypertext markup language}  
\begin{document}  
\gls{html}  
\printglossaries  
\end{document}

Table 2.1 lists the nearest equivalent glossaries-extra abbreviation styles for the predefined acronym styles provided by glossaries, but note that the new styles use different formatting commands. See §3.4 Predefined Abbreviation Styles for further details.


Table 2.1: Old Acronym Styles \setacronymstyle{old-style-name} Verses New Abbreviation Styles \setabbreviationstyle[category]{new-style-name}

Old Style Name

New Style Name

long-sc-short

long-short-sc

long-sm-short

long-short-sm

long-sp-short

long-short
with \renewcommand{\glsxtrfullsep}[1]{\glsacspace{#1}}

short-long

short-long

sc-short-long

short-sc-long

sm-short-long

short-sm-long

long-short-desc

long-short-desc

long-sc-short-desc

long-short-sc-desc

long-sm-short-desc

long-short-sm-desc

long-sp-short-desc

long-short-desc
with \renewcommand{\glsxtrfullsep}[1]{\glsacspace{#1}}

short-long-desc

short-long-desc

sc-short-long-desc

short-sc-long-desc

sm-short-long-desc

short-sm-long-desc

dua

long-noshort

dua-desc

long-noshort-desc

footnote

short-footnote

footnote-sc

short-sc-footnote

footnote-sm

short-sm-footnote

footnote-desc

short-footnote-desc

footnote-sc-desc

short-sc-footnote-desc

footnote-sm-desc

short-sm-footnote-desc


The reason for introducing the new style of abbreviation commands provided by glossaries-extra is because the original acronym commands provided by glossaries are too restrictive to work with the internal modifications made by glossaries-extra. However, if you really want to restore the generic acronym function provided by glossaries you can use


\RestoreAcronyms  \RestoreAcronyms

(before any use of \newacronym).

\RestoreAcronyms should not be used in combination with the newer glossaries-extra abbreviations. Don’t combine old and new style entries with the same type. The original glossaries acronym mechanism doesn’t work well with the newer glossaries-extra commands.

If you use \RestoreAcronyms, don’t use any of the commands provided by glossaries-extra intended for abbreviations (such as \glsxtrshort or \glsfmtshort) with entries defined via \newacronym as it will cause unexpected results.

In general, there’s rarely any need for \RestoreAcronyms. If you have a document that uses \newacronymstyle, then it’s best to either stick with just glossaries for that document or define an equivalent abbreviation style with \newabbreviationstyle. (See §3.5 Defining New Abbreviation Styles for further details.)


\glsacspace  \glsacspace{label}

The space command \glsacspace used by the long-sp-short acronym style provided by glossaries is modified so that it uses


\glsacspacemax  \glsacspacemax

instead of the hard-coded 3em. This is a command not a length and so can be changed using \renewcommand.

Any of the new abbreviation styles that use \glsxtrfullsep (such as long-short) can easily be changed to use \glsacspace with

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrfullsep}[1]{\glsacspace{#1}}

The first use acronym font command


\firstacronymfont{text}

is redefined to use the first use abbreviation font command \glsfirstabbrvfont. This will be reset if you use \RestoreAcronyms.

The subsequent use acronym font command


\acronymfont{text}

is redefined to use the subsequent use abbreviation font command \glsabbrvfont. This will be reset if you use \RestoreAcronyms.

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2.9 glossary-bookindex package

As from v1.21, glossaries-extra has a new supplementary package glossary-bookindex which provides the glossary style bookindex. This is very similar to the mcolindexgroup style but is designed for indexes, so by default only the name and location list are displayed. You can either load this package explicitly and then set the style:

\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\usepackage{glossary-bookindex}  
\setglossarystyle{bookindex}

or use both the stylemods and style options:

\usepackage[stylemods=bookindex,style=bookindex]{glossaries-extra}

The bookindex style only supports a maximum hierarchical level of 2 (top-level, level 1 and level 2).

The number of columns is given by


\glsxtrbookindexcols  \glsxtrbookindexcols

which defaults to 2.

This style uses the multicols environment. If the command


\glsxtrbookindexcolspread  \glsxtrbookindexcolspread

isn’t empty then it’s supplied as the optional argument following \begin{multicols} {n}. You can switch from multicols to multicols* by redefining


\glsxtrbookindexmulticolsenv  \glsxtrbookindexmulticolsenv

For example

\renewcommand{\glsxtrbookindexmulticolsenv}{multicols*}

Each top-level entry is displayed using


\glsxtrbookindexname  \glsxtrbookindexname{label}

where the entry is identified by ⟨label⟩. This just does \glossentryname{label} by default. For example, if you want the symbol to be included:

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrbookindexname}[1]{%  
 \glossentryname{#1}%  
 \ifglshassymbol{#1}{\space (\glossentrysymbol{#1})}{}%  
}

Alternatively you can use the \glsxtrpostnamecategory⟩ hook.

Sub-entries are displayed using


\glsxtrbookindexsubname  \glsxtrbookindexsubname{label}

which just defaults to \glsxtrbookindexname{label}.

The separator used before the location list for top-level entries is given by


\glsxtrbookindexprelocation  \glsxtrbookindexprelocation{label}

where ⟨label⟩ is the entry’s label. This checks if the location field has been set. If it has, it does

,\glsxtrprelocation

otherwise it just does \glsxtrprelocation (which defaults to \space). If you’re not using bib2gls, the location field won’t be set.

The separator used before the location list for sub-entries is given by


\glsxtrbookindexsubprelocation  \glsxtrbookindexsubprelocation{label}

which defaults to \glsxtrbookindexprelocation{label}.

The separator used between a top-level parent and child entry is given by


\glsxtrbookindexparentchildsep  \glsxtrbookindexparentchildsep

This defaults to \nopagebreak.

The separator used between a sub-level parent and child entry is given by


\glsxtrbookindexparentsubchildsep  \glsxtrbookindexparentsubchildsep

This defaults to \glsxtrbookindexparentchildsep.

The separator between top-level entries is given by


\glsxtrbookindexbetween  \glsxtrbookindexbetween{label1}{label2}

This comes after the entry given by ⟨label1⟩, if the entry has no children, or after the last descendent otherwise, so it always comes immediately before the entry given by ⟨label2⟩ unless the entry occurs at the start of a group. This does nothing by default.

The separator between two level 1 entries is given by


\glsxtrbookindexsubbetween  \glsxtrbookindexsubbetween{label1}{label2}

The separator between two level 2 entries is given by


\glsxtrbookindexsubsubbetween  \glsxtrbookindexsubsubbetween{label1} {label2}

At the end of each letter group, the following hooks are done in order:


\glsxtrbookindexsubsubatendgroup  \glsxtrbookindexsubsubatendgroup {sub-sub-label}


\glsxtrbookindexsubatendgroup  \glsxtrbookindexsubatendgroup{sub-label}


\glsxtrbookindexatendgroup  \glsxtrbookindexatendgroup{label}

where ⟨sub-sub-label⟩ is the label of the last level 2 entry, ⟨sub-label⟩ is the label of the last level 1 entry and ⟨label⟩ is the label of the last level 0 entry.

For example, the resource option seealso=omit instructs bib2gls to omit the seealso cross-reference from the location list. (The see cross-reference will still be added unless you also have see=omit.) The seealso cross-reference can instead be appended after the child entries using:

\renewcommand{\glsxtrbookindexatendgroup}[1]{%  
  \glsxtrifhasfield{seealso}{#1}{\glstreesubitem\glsxtruseseealso{#1}}{}%  
}  
\renewcommand{\glsxtrbookindexbetween}[2]{%  
  \glsxtrbookindexatendgroup{#1}%  
}%  
\renewcommand{\glsxtrbookindexsubatendgroup}[1]{%  
  \glsxtrifhasfield{seealso}{#1}{\glstreesubsubitem\glsxtruseseealso{#1}}{}%  
}  
\renewcommand{\glsxtrbookindexsubbetween}[2]{%  
  \glsxtrbookindexsubatendgroup{#1}%  
}  
\renewcommand{\glsxtrbookindexsubsubatendgroup}[1]{%  
  \glsxtrifhasfield{seealso}{#1}%  
  {\glstreeitem\hspace*{40pt}\glsxtruseseealso{#1}}{}%  
}  
\renewcommand{\glsxtrbookindexsubsubbetween}[2]{%  
  \glsxtrbookindexsubsubatendgroup{#1}%  
}

This uses \glstreesubitem and \glstreesubsubitem to indent the cross-reference according to the next level down, so the cross-reference for a top-level entry is aligned with the sub-entries, and a level 1 entry has its cross-reference aligned with sub-sub-entries. In the event that a level 2 entry has a cross-reference, this is indented a bit further (but it won’t be aligned with any deeper level as the bookindex style only supports a maximum of two sub-levels).

The bookindex style uses group headings. (If you use bib2gls remember to invoke it with the --group or -g switch.) The heading will use


\glsxtrbookindexbookmark  \glsxtrbookindexbookmark{group title}{name}

If \pdfbookmark has been defined, this will use that command to bookmark the group title. If section=chapter is set (default if chapters are defined) then this uses level 1 otherwise it uses level 2. You can redefine this command if this isn’t appropriate. If \pdfbookmark hasn’t been defined, this command does nothin.

The group heading is formatted according to


\glsxtrbookindexformatheader  \glsxtrbookindexformatheader{group title}

which is defined as

\newcommand*{\glsxtrbookindexformatheader}[1]{%  
  \par{\centering\glstreegroupheaderfmt{#1}\par}%  
}

where \glstreegroupheaderfmt is provided by the glossary-tree package, which is automatically loaded. Note that the entry names aren’t encapsulated with \glstreenamefmt.

The glossary-bookindex package provides some supplementary commands that aren’t used by default, but may be used when adjusting the style. These commands should only be used within one of the \print…glossary commands. (That is, they should only be used in glossary styles.)


\glsxtrbookindexmarkentry  \glsxtrbookindexmarkentry{label}

This writes information to the .aux file that can be read on the next run to obtain the first and last entry on each page of the glossary.

You can display the first entry associated with the current page using:


\glsxtrbookindexfirstmark  \glsxtrbookindexfirstmark

and the last entry associated with the current page using:


\glsxtrbookindexlastmark  \glsxtrbookindexlastmark

These do nothing if there are no entries marked on the current page (or if the document build isn’t up to date).

The entry is formatted using:


\glsxtrbookindexfirstmarkfmt  \glsxtrbookindexfirstmarkfmt{label}

for the first instance and


\glsxtrbookindexlastmarkfmt  \glsxtrbookindexlastmarkfmt{label}

for the last.

These commands are designed for use in page headers or footers where the page number is stable. For example, \glsxtrbookindexname can be redefined to mark the current entry:

\renewcommand{\glsxtrbookindexname}[1]{%  
  \glsxtrbookindexmarkentry{#1}%  
  \glossentryname{#1}%  
}

If you only want to mark the top-level entries, remember to redefine \glsxtrbookindexsubname as it defaults to \glsxtrbookindexname:

\renewcommand{\glsxtrbookindexsubname}[1]{%  
  \glossentryname{#1}%  
}

Then if you’re using fancyhdr you can set the page style to show the first and last entry for the current page with:

  \pagestyle{fancy}%  
  \lhead{\thepage}%  
  \lfoot{\glsxtrbookindexfirstmark}%  
  \cfoot{}%  
  \rfoot{\glsxtrbookindexlastmark}%

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2.10 Glossary Style Modifications

The glossaries-extra-stylemods package (more conveniently loaded through the glossaries-extra stylemods option) modifies some of the predefined styles that are provided with the glossaries package. These modifications are described in more detail in §2.10.3 The glossaries-extra-stylemods Package.

The glossaries package tries to determine the group title from its label by first checking if \labelgroupname exists. If it doesn’t exist, then the title is assumed to be the same as the label. For example, when typesetting the “A” letter group, glossaries first checks if \Agroupname exists. This could potentially cause conflict with another package that may have some other meaning for \Agroupname, so glossaries-extra first checks for the existence of the internal command \glsxtr@grouptitle@label⟩ which shouldn’t clash with another package. You can set the group title using


\glsxtrsetgrouptitle  \glsxtrsetgrouptitle{label}{title}

For example:

\glsxtrsetgrouptitle{A}{A (a)}

This uses a global assignment. If you need to scope the change you can use


\glsxtrlocalsetgrouptitle  \glsxtrlocalsetgrouptitle{label}{title}

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2.10.1 Style Hooks

The commands \glossentryname and \glossentrydesc are modified to take into account the glossname, glossdesc and glossdescfont attributes (see §5 Categories). This means you can make simple case-changing modifications to the name and description without defining a new glossary style.

If you want to adapt a style to use another field instead of name, you can use


\glossentrynameother  \glossentrynameother{label}{field}

This behaves just like \glossentryname (that is, it obeys glossname, glossnamefont or \glsnamefont and uses the post-name hook) but it uses the given ⟨field⟩ instead of name. The ⟨field⟩ argument must be the internal field name (for example desc rather than description). See the key to field mappings table in the glossaries user manual.

There is a hook after \glossentryname and \Glossentryname:


\glsxtrpostnamehook  \glsxtrpostnamehook{label}

By default this checks the indexname attribute. If the attribute exists for the category to which the label belongs, then the name is automatically indexed using


\glsxtrdoautoindexname{label}{indexname}

See §7 Auto-Indexing for further details.

As from version 1.04, the post-name hook \glsxtrpostnamehook will also use \glsxtrpostnamecategory⟩ if it exists. You can use \glscurrententrylabel to obtain the entry label with the definition of this command. For example, suppose you are using a glossary style the doesn’t display the symbol, you can insert the symbol after the name for a particular category, say, the “symbol” category:

\newcommand*{\glsxtrpostnamesymbol}{\space  
 (\glsentrysymbol{\glscurrententrylabel})}

For convenience, as from v1.31, you can use


\glsdefpostname  \glsdefpostname{category}{definition}

This is simply a shortcut for:

\csdefglsxtrpostnamecategory{definition}
Note that it doesn’t check if the command has already been defined.

As from version 1.25, the post-name hook also does


\glsextrapostnamehook  \glsextrapostnamehook{label}

(before \glsxtrpostnamecategory⟩) to allow for additional non-category related code. This does nothing by default.

The post-description code used within the glossary is modified so that it also does


\glsxtrpostdescription  \glsxtrpostdescription

This occurs before the original \glspostdescription, so if the nopostdot=false option is used, it will be inserted before the terminating full stop.

This new command will do \glsxtrpostdesccategory⟩ if it exists, where ⟨category⟩ is the category label associated with the current entry. For example \glsxtrpostdescgeneral for entries with the category set to general or \glsxtrpostdescacronym for entries with the category set to acronym. For convenience, as from v1.31, you can use


\glsdefpostdesc  \glsdefpostdesc{category}{definition}

This is simply a shortcut for:

\csdefglsxtrpostdesccategory{definition}
Note that it doesn’t check if the command has already been defined.

Since both \glossentry and \subglossentry set


\glscurrententrylabel  \glscurrententrylabel

to the label for the current entry, you can use this within the definition of these post-description hooks if you need to reference the label.

For example, suppose you want to insert the plural form in brackets after the description in the glossary, but only for entries in the general category, then you could do:

\renewcommand{\glsxtrpostdescgeneral}{\space  
 (plural: \glsentryplural{\glscurrententrylabel})}

This means you don’t have to define a custom glossary style, which you may find more complicated. (It also allows more flexibility if you decide to change the underlying glossary style.)

This feature can’t be used for glossary styles that ignore \glspostdescription or if you redefine \glspostdescription without including \glsxtrpostdescription. (For example, if you redefine \glspostdescription to do nothing instead of using the nopostdot option to suppress the terminating full stop.) See §2.10.3 The glossaries-extra-stylemods Package to patch the predefined styles provided by glossaries that are missing \glspostdescription.

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2.10.2 Number List

The number list is now placed inside the argument of


\GlsXtrFormatLocationList  \GlsXtrFormatLocationList{number list}

This is internally used by \glossaryentrynumbers. The nonumberlist option redefines \glossaryentrynumbers so that it doesn’t display the number list, but it still saves the number list in case it’s required.

If you want to suppress the number list always use the nonumberlist option instead of redefining \glossaryentrynumbers to do nothing.

If you want to, for example, change the font for the entire number list then redefine \GlsXtrFormatLocationList as appropriate. Don’t modify \glossaryentrynumbers.

Sometimes users like to insert “page” or “pages” in front of the number list. This is quite fiddly to do with the base glossaries package, but glossaries-extra provides a way of doing this. First you need to enable this option and specify the text to display using:


\GlsXtrEnablePreLocationTag  \GlsXtrEnablePreLocationTag{page}{pages}

where ⟨page⟩ is the text to display if the number list only contains a single location and ⟨pages⟩ is the text to display otherwise. For example:

\GlsXtrEnablePreLocationTag{Page: }{Pages: }

An extra run is required when using this command.

Use glsignore not @gobble as the format if you want to suppress the page number (and only index the entry once).

See the accompanying sample file sample-pages.tex.

Note that bib2gls can be instructed to insert a prefix at the start of non-empty location lists, which can be used as an alternative to \GlsXtrEnablePreLocationTag.

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2.10.3 The glossaries-extra-stylemods Package

As from v1.02, glossaries-extra now includes the package glossaries-extra-stylemods that will redefine the predefined styles to include the post-description hook (for those that are missing it). You will need to make sure the styles have already been defined before loading glossaries-extra. For example:

\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\usepackage{glossary-longragged}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra-stylemods}

Alternatively you can load glossary-name.sty at the same time by passing ⟨name⟩ as a package option to glossaries-extra-stylemods. For example:

\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\usepackage[longragged]{glossaries-extra-stylemods}

Another option is to use the stylemods key when you load glossaries-extra. You can omit a value if you only want to use the predefined styles that are automatically loaded by glossaries (for example, the long3col style):

\usepackage[style=long3col,stylemods]{glossaries-extra}

Or the value of stylemods may be a comma-separated list of the style package identifiers. For example:

\usepackage[style=mcoltree,stylemods=mcols]{glossaries-extra}

Remember to group the value if it contains any commas:

\usepackage[stylemods={mcols,longbooktabs}]{glossaries-extra}

Note that the inline style is dealt with slightly differently. The original definition provided by the glossary-inline package uses \glspostdescription at the end of the glossary (not after each entry description) within the definition of \glspostinline. The style modification changes this so that \glspostinline just does a full stop followed by space factor adjustment, and the description \glsinlinedescformat and sub-entry description formats \glsinlinesubdescformat are redefined to include \glsxtrpostdescription (not \glspostdescription). This means that the modified inline style isn’t affected by the nopostdot option, but the post-description category hook can still be used.

The tabular-like styles, such as long are adjusted so that the \ifglsnogroupskip conditional (set with nogroupskip) is moved outside of the definition of \glsgroupskip to avoid problems that cause an “Incomplete \iftrue” error with \printunsrtglossary and \printnoidxglossary. This means that if you want to change this conditional using \setupglossaries or using the nogroupskip option in \printglossary, \printnoidxglossary or \printunsrtglossary, you must also reset the glossary style.

As from version 1.21, the hard-coded \space before the number list in many of the predefined styles is replaced with


\glsxtrprelocation  \glsxtrprelocation

This just defaults to \space but may be redefined as required. For example:

\renewcommand{\glsxtrprelocation}{\dotfill}

The list styles use


\glslistprelocation  \glslistprelocation

(which defaults to \glsxtrprelocation) for top-level items and


\glslistchildprelocation  \glslistchildprelocation

(which defaults to \glslistprelocation) for child items.

As from v1.31, the description (including the post-description hook) is governed by:


\glslistdesc  \glslistdesc{label}

for the list and altlist styles (but not the listdotted variations).

For just the list style and its letter group variations (not the altlist or listdotted variations) the number list for child entries is followed by


\glslistchildpostlocation  \glslistchildpostlocation

which defaults to a full stop.

The default value of \glslistdottedwidth is changed so that it’s set at the start of the document (if it hasn’t been changed in the preamble). This should take into account situations where \hsize isn’t set until the start of the document.

The glossary-tree package introduced two new commands in glossaries version 4.22, \glstreegroupheaderfmt and \glstreenavigationfmt, which are used to format the letter group headings and the navigation elements for the appropriate styles. These two new commands are defined in terms of \glstreenamefmt since that was the command originally used for the group headings and navigation. This now allows these different elements to be defined independently, but the most common redefinition is for \glstreenamefmt to remove the bold in the name. If the bold is still required for the group heading and navigation elements, then both other commands also need redefining. To simplify matters, if \glstreenamefmt has been defined, as from v1.31 glossaries-extra-stylemods defines:


\glstreedefaultnamefmt  \glstreedefaultnamefmt{text}

which simply does \textbf{text} and redefines \glstreenamefmt, \glstreegroupheaderfmt and \glstreenavigationfmt all in terms of \glstreedefaultnamefmt. This means that if you want to change all three to use a particular style you only need to redefine \glstreedefaultnamefmt, but if you only want to redefine \glstreenamefmt without affecting the other two commands, then you now can.

The index-like and tree-like styles insert the pre-number list space with


\glstreeprelocation  \glstreeprelocation

(which defaults to \glsxtrprelocation) for top-level items and


\glstreechildprelocation  \glstreechildprelocation

(which defaults to \glstreeprelocation) for child items.

As from version 1.31, the glossaries-extra-stylemods package also provides:


\glstreenonamedesc  \glstreenonamedesc{label}

which is used by the treenoname styles to display the pre-description separator, the description and the post-description hook. Similarly for the symbol:


\glstreenonamesymbol  \glstreenonamesymbol{label}

The above are just used for top-level entries. Child entries don’t have the name or symbol displayed for the treenoname styles, so there’s only a command for the child description:


\glstreenonamechilddesc  \glstreenonamechilddesc{label}

For the tree styles (but not the treenoname or alttree styles), the description is displayed using:


\glstreedesc  \glstreedesc{label}

and the symbol with:


\glstreesymbol  \glstreesymbol{label}

Again the above two commands are just for top-level entries. The child entries use:


\glstreechilddesc  \glstreechilddesc{label}

for the description and


\glstreechildsymbol  \glstreechildsymbol{label}

for the symbol.

As from version 1.05, the glossaries-extra-stylemods package provides some additional commands for use with the alttree style to make it easier to modify. These commands are only defined if the glossary-tree package has already been loaded, which is typically the case unless the notree option has been used when loading glossaries.


\gglssetwidest  \gglssetwidest[level]{name}

(New to version 1.21.) This is like \glssetwidest (provided by glossary-tree) but performs a global assignment.


\eglssetwidest  \eglssetwidest[level]{name}

This is like \glssetwidest but performs a protected expansion on ⟨name⟩. This has a localised effect. For a global setting, use


\xglssetwidest  \xglssetwidest[level]{name}

The following only set the value if ⟨name⟩ is wider than the current value (new to version 1.23). Local update:


\glsupdatewidest  \glsupdatewidest[level]{name}

Global update:


\gglsupdatewidest  \gglsupdatewidest[level]{name}

Locale update (expands ⟨name⟩):


\eglsupdatewidest  \eglsupdatewidest[level]{name}

Global update (expands ⟨name⟩):


\xglsupdatewidest  \xglsupdatewidest[level]{name}

The widest entry value can later be retrieved using


\glsgetwidestname  \glsgetwidestname

for the top-level entries and


\glsgetwidestsubname  \glsgetwidestsubname{level}

for sub-entries, where ⟨level⟩ is the level number.

Note that if you are using bib2gls, you can use the resource option set-widest which will try to determine the widest name of all the selected entries. This isn’t guaranteed to work as it may depend on fonts or commands that bib2gls can’t replicate, but it should be suitable for names that just consist of text, and can be more efficient than iterating over all the defined entries using TEX.

The command \glsfindwidesttoplevelname provided by glossary-tree has a CamelCase synonym:


\glsFindWidestTopLevelName  \glsFindWidestTopLevelName[glossary list]

Similar commands are also provided:


\glsFindWidestUsedTopLevelName  \glsFindWidestUsedTopLevelName[glossary list]

This has an additional check that the entry has been used. Naturally this is only useful if the glossaries that use the alttree style occur at the end of the document. This command should be placed just before the start of the glossary. (Alternatively, place it at the end of the document and save the value in the auxiliary file for the next run.)


\glsFindWidestUsedAnyName  \glsFindWidestUsedAnyName[glossary list]

This is like the previous command but if doesn’t check the parent key. This is useful if all levels should have the same width for the name.


\glsFindWidestAnyName  \glsFindWidestAnyName[glossary list]

This is like the previous command but doesn’t check if the entry has been used.


\glsFindWidestUsedLevelTwo  \glsFindWidestUsedLevelTwo[glossary list]

This is like \glsFindWidestUsedTopLevelName but also sets the first two sub-levels as well. Any entry that has a great-grandparent is ignored.


\glsFindWidestLevelTwo  \glsFindWidestLevelTwo[glossary list]

This is like the previous command but doesn’t check if the entry has been used.


\glsFindWidestUsedAnyNameSymbol  \glsFindWidestUsedAnyNameSymbol [glossary list]{register}

This is like \glsFindWidestUsedAnyName but also measures the symbol. The length of the widest symbol is stored in ⟨register⟩.


\glsFindWidestAnyNameSymbol  \glsFindWidestAnyNameSymbol[glossary list]{register}

This is like the previous command but it doesn’t check if the entry has been used.


\glsFindWidestUsedAnyNameSymbolLocation  \glsFindWidestUsedAnyNameSymbolLocation [glossary list]{symbol register}{location register}

This is like \glsFindWidestUsedAnyNameSymbol but also measures the number list. This requires \glsentrynumberlist (see the glossaries user manual). The length of the widest symbol is stored in ⟨symbol register⟩ and the length of the widest number list is stored in ⟨location register⟩.


\glsFindWidestAnyNameSymbolLocation  \glsFindWidestAnyNameSymbolLocation [glossary list]{symbol register}{location register}

This is like the previous command but it doesn’t check if the entry has been used.


\glsFindWidestUsedAnyNameLocation  \glsFindWidestUsedAnyNameLocation [glossary list]{register}

This is like \glsFindWidestUsedAnyNameSymbolLocation but doesn’t measure the symbol. The length of the widest number list is stored in ⟨register⟩.


\glsFindWidestAnyNameLocation  \glsFindWidestAnyNameLocation[glossary list]{register}

This is like the previous command but doesn’t check if the entry has been used.

The layout of the symbol, description and number list is governed by


\glsxtralttreeSymbolDescLocation  \glsxtralttreeSymbolDescLocation {label}{number list}

for top-level entries and


\glsxtralttreeSubSymbolDescLocation  \glsxtralttreeSubSymbolDescLocation {label}{number list}

for sub-entries.

There is now a user level command that performs the initialisation for the alttree style:


\glsxtralttreeInit  \glsxtralttreeInit

The paragraph indent for subsequent paragraphs in multi-paragraph descriptions is provided by the length


\glsxtrAltTreeIndent  \glsxtrAltTreeIndent

For additional commands that are available with the alttree style, see the documented code (glossaries-extra-code.pdf). For examples, see the accompanying sample files sample-alttree.tex, sample-alttree-sym.tex and sample-alttree-marginpar.tex.

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3. Abbreviations

Abbreviations include acronyms (words formed from initial letters, such as “laser”), initialisms (initial letters of a phrase, such as “html”, that aren’t pronounced as words) and contractions (where parts of words are omitted, often replaced by an apostrophe, such as “don’t”). The “acronym” code provided by the glossaries package is misnamed as it’s more often than not used for initialisms instead. Acronyms tend not to be expanded on first use (although they may need to be described for readers unfamiliar with the term). They are therefore more like a regular term, which may or may not require a description in the glossary.

The glossaries-extra package corrects this misnomer, and provides better abbreviation handling, with


\newabbreviation  \newabbreviation[options]{label}{short}{long}

This sets the category key to abbreviation by default, but that value may be overridden in ⟨options⟩. The category may have attributes that modify the way abbreviations are defined. For example, the insertdots attribute will automatically insert full stops (periods) into ⟨short⟩ or the noshortplural attribute will set the default value of the shortplural key to just ⟨short⟩ (without appending the plural suffix). See §5 Categories for further details.

See §2.7 Nested Links regarding the pitfalls of using commands like \gls or \glsxtrshort within ⟨short⟩ or ⟨long⟩.

Make sure that you set the category attributes before defining new abbreviations or they may not be correctly applied.

The \newacronym command provided by the glossaries package is redefined by glossaries-extra to use \newabbreviation with the category set to acronym (see also §2.8 Acronym Style Modifications) so


\newacronym  \newacronym[options]{label}{short}{long}

is now equivalent to
\newabbreviation[type=\acronymtype,category=acronym,options] {label} {short} {long}

The \newabbreviation command is superficially similar to the glossaries package’s \newacronym but you can apply different styles to different categories. The default style is short-nolong for entries in the acronym category and short-long for entries in the abbreviation category. (These aren’t the same as the acronym styles provided by the glossaries package, although they may produce similar results.)

The way the abbreviations are displayed by commands like \gls varies according to the abbreviation style. The styles are set according to the entry’s category so, unlike the base glossaries package, you can have different abbreviation styles within the same glossary.

There are two types of full forms. The display full form, which is used on first use by commands like \gls and the inline full form, which is used by commands like \glsxtrfull. For some of the abbreviation styles, such as long-short, the display and inline forms are the same. In the case of styles such as short-nolong or short-footnote, the display and inline full forms are different.

These formatting commands aren’t stored in the short, shortplural, long or longplural fields, which means they won’t be used within commands like \glsentryshort (but they are used within commands like \glsxtrshort and \glsfmtshort). Note that \glsxtrlong and the case-changing variants don’t use \glsfirstlongfont.

You can apply the formatting command used for the short form to some arbitrary text using


\glsuseabbrvfont  \glsuseabbrvfont{text}{category}

where ⟨category⟩ is the category label that identifies the abbreviation style. Similarly for the formatting command use by the long form:


\glsuselongfont  \glsuselongfont{text}{category}

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3.1 Tagging Initials

If you would like to tag the initial letters in the long form such that those letters are underlined in the glossary but not in the main part of the document, you can use


\GlsXtrEnableInitialTagging  \GlsXtrEnableInitialTagging{categories} {cs}

before you define your abbreviations.

This command (robustly) defines ⟨cs⟩ (a control sequence) to accept a single argument, which is the letter (or letters) that needs to be tagged. The normal behaviour of this command within the document is to simply do its argument, but in the glossary it’s activated for those categories that have the tagging attribute set to “true”. For those cases it will use


\glsxtrtagfont  \glsxtrtagfont{text}

This command defaults to \underline{text} but may be redefined as required.

The control sequence ⟨cs⟩ can’t already be defined when used with the unstarred version of \GlsXtrEnableInitialTagging for safety reasons. The starred version will overwrite any previous definition of ⟨cs⟩. As with redefining any commands, ensure that you don’t redefine something important. In fact, just forget the existence of the starred version and let’s pretend I didn’t mention it.

The first argument of \GlsXtrEnableInitialTagging is a comma-separated list of category names. The tagging attribute will automatically be set for those categories. You can later set this attribute for other categories (see §5 Categories) but this must be done before the glossary is displayed.

The accompanying sample file sample-mixtures.tex uses initial tagging for both the acronym and abbreviation categories:

\GlsXtrEnableInitialTagging{acronym,abbreviation}{\itag}

This defines the command \itag which can be used in the definitions. For example:

\newacronym  
 [description={a system for detecting the location and  
 speed of ships, aircraft, etc, through the use of radio  
 waves}% description of this term  
 ]  
 {radar}% identifying label  
 {radar}% short form (i.e. the word)  
 {\itag{ra}dio \itag{d}etection \itag{a}nd \itag{r}anging}  
\newabbreviation{xml}{XML}  
 {e\itag{x}tensible \itag{m}arkup \itag{l}anguage}

The underlining of the tagged letters only occurs in the glossary and then only for entries with the tagging attribute set.

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3.2 Abbreviation Styles

The abbreviation style must be set before abbreviations are defined using:


\setabbreviationstyle  \setabbreviationstyle[category]{style-name}

where ⟨style-name⟩ is the name of the style and ⟨category⟩ is the category label (abbreviation by default). New abbreviations will pick up the current style according to their given category. If there is no style set for the category, the fallback is the style for the abbreviation category. Some styles may automatically modify one or more of the attributes associated with the given category. For example, the long-noshort and short-nolong styles set the regular attribute to true.

If you want to apply different styles to groups of abbreviations, assign a different category to each group and set the style for the given category.

Note that \setacronymstyle is disabled by glossaries-extra. Use

\setabbreviationstyle[acronym]{style-name}
instead. The original acronym interface can be restored with \RestoreAcronyms (see §2.8 Acronym Style Modifications). However the original acronym interface is incompatible with all the commands described here.

Abbreviations can be used with the standard glossaries commands, such as \gls, but don’t use the acronym commands like \acrshort (which use \acronymfont). The short form can be produced with:


\glsxtrshort  \glsxtrshort[options]{label}[insert]

(Use this instead of \acrshort.)

The long form can be produced with


\glsxtrlong  \glsxtrlong[options]{label}[insert]

(Use this instead of \acrlong.)

The inline full form can be produced with


\glsxtrfull  \glsxtrfull[options]{label}[insert]

(This this instead of \acrfull.)

In general, it’s best not to use commands like \glsfirst for abbreviations, especially if you use the ⟨insert⟩ optional argument. Use either \gls (possibly with a reset) or \glsxtrfull.

As mentioned earlier, the inline full form may not necessarily match the format used on first use with \gls. For example, the short-nolong style only displays the short form on first use, but the full form will display the long form followed by the short form in parentheses.

If you want to use an abbreviation in a chapter or section title, use the commands described in §4 Entries in Sectioning Titles, Headers, Captions and Contents instead.

The arguments ⟨options⟩, ⟨label⟩ and ⟨insert⟩ are the same as for commands such as \glstext. There are also analogous case-changing commands:

First letter upper case short form:


\Glsxtrshort  \Glsxtrshort[options]{label}[insert]

First letter upper case long form:


\Glsxtrlong  \Glsxtrlong[options]{label}[insert]

First letter upper case inline full form:


\Glsxtrfull  \Glsxtrfull[options]{label}[insert]

All upper case short form:


\Glsxtrshort  \GLSxtrshort[options]{label}[insert]

All upper case long form:


\Glsxtrlong  \GLSxtrlong[options]{label}[insert]

All upper case inline full form:


\GLSxtrfull  \GLSxtrfull[options]{label}[insert]

Plural forms are also available.

Short form plurals:


\glsxtrshortpl  \glsxtrshortpl[options]{label}[insert]


\Glsxtrshortpl  \Glsxtrshortpl[options]{label}[insert]


\GLSxtrshortpl  \GLSxtrshortpl[options]{label}[insert]

Long form plurals:


\glsxtrlongpl  \glsxtrlongpl[options]{label}[insert]


\Glsxtrlongpl  \Glsxtrlongpl[options]{label}[insert]


\GLSxtrlongpl  \GLSxtrlongpl[options]{label}[insert]

Full form plurals:


\glsxtrfullpl  \glsxtrfullpl[options]{label}[insert]


\Glsxtrfullpl  \Glsxtrfullpl[options]{label}[insert]


\GLSxtrfullpl  \GLSxtrfullpl[options]{label}[insert]

Be careful about using \glsentryfull, \Glsentryfull, \glsentryfullpl and \Glsentryfullpl. These commands will use the currently applied style rather than the style in use when the entry was defined. If you have mixed styles, you’ll need to use \glsxtrfull instead. Similarly for \glsentryshort etc.

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3.3 Shortcut Commands

The abbreviation shortcut commands can be enabled using the package option shortcuts=abbreviation (or shortcuts=abbr) or shortcuts=ac. (You can use both settings at the same time.) The provided shortcut commands listed in table 3.1.


Table 3.1: Abbreviation Shortcut Commands
Shortcut Shortcut Equivalent Command
(shortcuts=abbreviation)(shortcuts=ac)
\ab \ac \cgls
\abp \acp \cglspl
\as \acs \glsxtrshort
\asp \acsp \glsxtrshortpl
\al \acl \glsxtrlong
\alp \aclp \glsxtrlongpl
\af \acf \glsxtrfull
\afp \acfp \glsxtrfullpl
\Ab \Ac \cgls
\Abp \Acp \cglspl
\As \Acs \Glsxtrshort
\Asp \Acsp \Glsxtrshortpl
\Al \Acl \Glsxtrlong
\Alp \Aclp \Glsxtrlongpl
\Af \Acf \Glsxtrfull
\Afp \Acfp \Glsxtrfullpl
\AB \AC \cGLS
\ABP \ACP \cGLSpl
\AS \ACS \GLSxtrshort
\ASP \ACSP \GLSxtrshortpl
\AL \ACL \GLSxtrlong
\ALP \ACLP \GLSxtrlongpl
\AF \ACF \GLSxtrfull
\AFP \ACFP \GLSxtrfullpl
\newabbr \newabbr \newabbreviation

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3.4 Predefined Abbreviation Styles

There are two types of abbreviation styles: those that treat the abbreviation as a regular entry (so that \gls uses \glsgenentryfmt) and those that don’t treat the abbreviation as a regular entry (so that \gls uses \glsxtrgenabbrvfmt).

The regular entry abbreviation styles set the regular attribute to “true” for the category assigned to each abbreviation with that style. This means that on first use, \gls uses the value of the first field and on subsequent use \gls uses the value of the text field (and analogously for the plural and case-changing versions). The short and long fields are set as appropriate and may be accessed through commands like \glsxtrshort.

The other abbreviation styles don’t modify the regular attribute. The first and text fields (and their plural forms) are set and can be accessed through commands like \glsfirst, but they aren’t used by commands like \gls, which instead use the short form (stored in the short key) and the display full format (through commands like \glsxtrfullformat that are defined by the style).

In both cases, the first use of \gls may not match the text produced by \glsfirst (and likewise for the plural and case-changing versions).

The sample file sample-abbr-styles.tex demonstrates all predefined styles described here.

For the “sc” styles that use \textsc, be careful about your choice of fonts as some only have limited support. For example, you may not be able to combine bold and small-caps. I recommend that you at least use the fontenc package with the T1 option or something similar.

The parenthetical styles, such as long-short, use


\glsxtrparen  \glsxtrparen{text}

to set the parenthetical material. This just puts parentheses around the text: (⟨text⟩).

The basic abbreviation styles, such as long-short and short-long use


\glsabbrvdefaultfont  \glsabbrvdefaultfont{text}

for the short form. This just does ⟨text⟩ by default. (That is, no font change is applied.) On first use,


\glsfirstabbrvdefaultfont  \glsfirstabbrvdefaultfont{text}

is used instead. By default, this just does \glsabbrvdefaultfont. The long form is formatted according to


\glslongdefaultfont  \glslongdefaultfont{text}

which again just does ⟨text⟩ (no font change). On first use,


\glsfirstlongdefaultfont  \glsfirstlongdefaultfont{text}

is used instead. This just does \glslongdefaultfont. The plural suffix used for the short form is given by


\glsxtrabbrvpluralsuffix  \glsxtrabbrvpluralsuffix

which defaults to \glspluralsuffix.

The small-cap styles, such as long-short-sc and short-sc-long, use


\glsabbrvscfont  \glsabbrvscfont{text}

which uses \textsc.3.1 On first use


\glsabbrvdefaultfont  \glsfirstabbrvscfont{text}

is used instead. This uses \glsabbrvscfont by default. So redefine, \glsabbrvscfont to change first and subsequent uses or \glsfirstabbrvscfont to change just the first use.

The long form for the small-cap styles uses \glslongdefaultfont or \glsfirstlongdefaultfont, as with the basic style. The suffix is given by


\glsxtrscsuffix  \glsxtrscsuffix

This is defined as

\newcommand*{\glsxtrscsuffix}{\glstextup{\glsxtrabbrvpluralsuffix}}

The \glstextup command is provided by glossaries and is used to switch off the small caps font for the suffix. If you override the default short plural using the shortplural key when you define the abbreviation you will need to make the appropriate adjustment if necessary. (Remember that the default plural suffix behaviour can be modified through the use of the aposplural and noshortplural attributes. See §5 Categories for further details.)

The small styles, such as long-short-sm and short-sm-long, use


\glsabbrvsmfont  \glsabbrvsmfont{text}

which uses \textsmaller. (This requires the relsizes package, which isn’t loaded by glossaries-extra, so must be loaded explicitly.) On first use


\glsfirstabbrvsmfont  \glsfirstabbrvsmfont{text}

is used instead. This uses \glsabbrvsmfont by default.

The long form for the smaller styles uses \glslongdefaultfont or \glsfirstlongdefaultfont, as with the basic style. The suffix is given by


\glsxtrsmsuffix  \glsxtrsmsuffix

which defaults to just \glsxtrabbrvpluralsuffix.

The “short-em” (emphasize short) styles, such as long-short-em or short-em-long, use


\glsabbrvemfont  \glsabbrvemfont{text}

On first use


\glsfirstabbrvemfont  \glsfirstabbrvemfont{text}

is used instead. This uses \glsabbrvemfont by default. The suffix is given by


\glsxtremsuffix  \glsxtremsuffix

which defaults to just \glsxtrabbrvpluralsuffix. The long form is as for the basic style unless the style is a “long-em” style.

The “long-em” (emphasize long) styles, such as long-em-short-em or short-em-long-em, use


\glsfirstlongemfont  \glsfirstlongemfont{long-form}

instead of \glsfirstlongdefaultfont{long-form} and


\glslongemfont  \glslongemfont{long-form}

instead of \glslongdefaultfont{long-form}. The first form \glsfirstlongemfont is initialised to use \glslongemfont.

The user styles have similar commands:


\glsabbrvuserfont  \glsabbrvuserfont{text}

for the short form,


\glsfirstabbrvuserfont  \glsfirstabbrvuserfont{text}

for the first use short form,


\glslonguserfont  \glslonguserfont{text}

for the long form,


\glsfirstlonguserfont  \glsfirstlonguserfont{text}

for the first use long form, and


\glsxtrusersuffix  \glsxtrusersuffix

for the short plural suffix.

Similarly for the hyphen styles:


\glsabbrvhyphenfont  \glsabbrvhyphenfont{text}

for the short form,


\glsfirstabbrvhyphenfont  \glsfirstabbrvhyphenfont{text}

for the first use short form,


\glslonghyphenfont  \glslonghyphenfont{text}

for the long form,


\glsfirstlonghyphenfont  \glsfirstlonghyphenfont{text}

for the first use long form, and


\glsxtrhyphensuffix  \glsxtrhyphensuffix

for the short plural suffix.

Similarly for the “only” styles, such as long-only-short-only:


\glsabbrvonlyfont  \glsabbrvonlyfont{text}

for the short form,


\glsfirstabbrvonlyfont  \glsfirstabbrvonlyfont{text}

for the first use short form,


\glslongonlyfont  \glslongonlyfont{text}

for the long form,


\glsfirstlongonlyfont  \glsfirstlongonlyfont{text}

for the first use long form, and


\glsxtronlysuffix  \glsxtronlysuffix

for the short plural suffix.

Note that by default inserted material (provided in the final optional argument of commands like \gls), is placed outside the font command in the predefined styles. To move it inside, use:


\glsxtrinsertinsidetrue  \glsxtrinsertinsidetrue

This applies to all the predefined styles. For example:

\setabbreviationstyle{long-short}  
\renewcommand*{\glsfirstlongdefaultfont}[1]{\emph{#1}}  
\glsxtrinsertinsidetrue

This will make the long form and the inserted text emphasized, whereas the default (without \glsxtrinsertinsidetrue) would place the inserted text outside of the emphasized font.

Note that for some styles, such as the short-long, the inserted text would be placed inside the font command for the short form (rather than the long form in the above example).

Remember that \textsc renders lowercase letters as small capitals. Uppercase letters are rendered as normal uppercase letters, so if you specify the short form in uppercase, you won’t get small capitals unless you redefine \glsabbrvscfont to convert its argument to lowercase. For example:

\renewcommand*{\glsabbrvscfont}[1]{\textsc{\MakeLowercase{#1}}}

If you want to easily switch between the “sc” and “sm” styles, you may find it easier to redefine this command to convert case:

\renewcommand*{\glsabbrvscfont}[1]{\textsc{\MakeTextLowercase{#1}}}  
\renewcommand*{\glsabbrvsmfont}[1]{\textsmaller{\MakeTextUppercase{#1}}}

Some of the styles use


\glsxtrfullsep  \glsxtrfullsep{label}

as a separator between the long and short forms. This is defined as a space by default, but may be changed as required. For example:

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrfullsep}[1]{~}

or

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrfullsep}[1]{\glsacspace{#1}}

The new naming scheme for abbreviation styles is as follows:

Not all combinations that fit the above syntax are provided. Pre-version 1.04 styles that didn’t fit this naming scheme are either provided with a synonym (where the former name wasn’t ambiguous) or provided with a deprecated synonym (where the former name was confusing). The deprecated style names generate a warning using:


\GlsXtrWarnDeprecatedAbbrStyle  \GlsXtrWarnDeprecatedAbbrStyle {old-name}{new-name}

where ⟨old-name⟩ is the deprecated name and ⟨new-name⟩ is the preferred name. You can suppress these warnings by redefining this command to do nothing.

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3.4.1 Predefined Abbreviation Styles that Set the Regular Attribute

The following abbreviation styles set the regular attribute to “true” for all categories that have abbreviations defined with any of these styles.

short-nolong
This only displays the short form on first use. The name is set to the short form through the command


\glsxtrshortnolongname  \glsxtrshortnolongname

(Similarly for the other shortmodifier-nolongmodifier⟩ styles, unless indicated otherwise.) This command is expanded as the entry is defined, so any redefinition must be done before \newabbreviation (or \newacronym) for it to take effect. Make sure to \protect any formatting commands (or anything else that shouldn’t be expanded).

The description is set to the long form. The inline full form displays ⟨short⟩ (⟨long⟩). The long form on its own can be displayed through commands like \glsxtrlong.

short
A synonym for short-nolong.
nolong-short
Like short-nolong but the inline full form displays ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩).
short-sc-nolong
Like short-nolong but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvscfont (which defaults to \textsc).
short-sc
A synonym for short-sc-nolong
nolong-short-sc
Like short-sc-nolong but the inline full form displays ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩). The name is still obtained from \glsxtrshortnolongname (similarly for the other styles in the form nolongmodifier-shortmodifier⟩ unless indicated otherwise).
short-sm-nolong
Like short-nolong but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvsmfont (which defaults to \textsmaller).
short-sm
A synonym for short-sm-nolong.
nolong-short-sm
Like short-sm-nolong but the inline full form displays ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩).
short-em-nolong
Like short-nolong but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvemfont.
short-em
A synonym for short-em-nolong
nolong-short-em
Like short-em-nolong but the inline full form displays ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩).
short-nolong-desc
Like the short-nolong style, but the name is set to the full form obtained by expanding


\glsxtrshortdescname  \glsxtrshortdescname

(Similarly for the other shortmodifier-nolongmodifier-desc styles, unless indicated otherwise.) This command is expanded when the entry is defined, so \protect fragile and formatting commands and only redefine this command before \newabbreviation (or \newacronym).

The description must be supplied by the user. You may prefer to use the short-nolong style with the post-description hook set to display the long form and override the description key. (See the sample file sample-acronym-desc.tex.)

short-desc
A synonym for short-nolong-desc.
short-sc-nolong-desc
Like short-nolong but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvscfont (which defaults to \textsc).
short-sc-desc
A synonym for short-sc-nolong-desc.
short-sm-nolong-desc
Like short-nolong-desc but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvsmfont (which defaults to \textsmaller).
short-sm-desc
A synonym for short-sm-nolong-desc.
short-em-nolong-desc
Like short-nolong-desc but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvemfont.
short-em-desc
A synonym for short-em-nolong-desc.
long-noshort-desc
This style only displays the long form, regardless of first or subsequent use of commands \gls. The short form may be accessed through commands like \glsxtrshort. The inline full form displays ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩).

The sort key are set to the long form. The name key is also set to the long form, but this is done by expanding


\glsxtrlongnoshortdescname  \glsxtrlongnoshortdescname

(Similarly for the other longmodifier-noshortmodifier-desc styles, unless indicated otherwise.) This command should only be redefined before abbreviations are defined, and any fragile or formatting commands within it need protecting.

The description must be provided by the user. The predefined glossary styles won’t display the short form. You can use the post-description hook to automatically append the short form to the description. The inline full form will display ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩).

long-desc
A synonym for long-noshort-desc.
long-noshort-sc-desc
Like the long-noshort-desc style but the short form (accessed through commands like \glsxtrshort) use \glsabbrvscfont. (This style was originally called long-desc-sc. Renamed in version 1.04, but original name retained as a deprecated synonym for backward-compatibility.)
long-noshort-sm-desc
Like long-noshort-desc but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvsmfont. (This style was originally called long-desc-sm. Renamed in version 1.04, but original name retained as a deprecated synonym for backward-compatibility.)
long-noshort-em-desc
Like long-noshort-desc but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvemfont. The long form isn’t emphasized. (This style was originally called long-desc-em. Renamed in version 1.04, but original name retained as a deprecated synonym for backward-compatibility.)
long-em-noshort-em-desc
New to version 1.04, like long-noshort-desc but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvemfont. The long form uses \glsfirstlongemfont and \glslongemfont.
long-noshort
This style doesn’t really make sense if you don’t use the short form anywhere in the document, but is provided for completeness. This is like the long-noshort-desc style, but the sort key is set to the short form. The name key is also set to the short form, but this is done by expanding


\glsxtrlongnoshortname  \glsxtrlongnoshortname

(Similarly for other longmodifier-noshortmodifier⟩ styles, unless indicated otherwise.) This command should only be redefined before abbreviations are defined, and fragile or formatting commands should be protected.

The description is set to the long form.

long
A synonym for long-noshort
long-noshort-sc
Like the long-noshort style but the short form (accessed through commands like \glsxtrshort) use \glsabbrvscfont. (This style was originally called long-sc. Renamed in version 1.04, but original name retained as a deprecated synonym for backward-compatibility.)
long-noshort-sm
Like long-noshort but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvsmfont. (This style was originally called long-sm. Renamed in version 1.04, but original name retained as a deprecated synonym for backward-compatibility.)
long-noshort-em
This style is like long-noshort but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvemfont. The long form isn’t emphasized. (This style was originally called long-em. Renamed in version 1.04, but original name retained as a deprecated synonym for backward-compatibility.)
long-em-noshort-em
New to version 1.04, this style is like long-noshort but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvemfont, \glsfirstlongfont to use \glsfirstlongemfont and \glslongfont to use \glslongemfont. The short form isn’t used by commands like \gls, but can be obtained using \glsxtrshort. The related style long-em-noshort-em-noreg doesn’t set the regular attribute.

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3.4.2 Predefined Abbreviation Styles that Don’t Set the Regular Attribute

The following abbreviation styles will set the regular attribute to “false” if it has previously been set. If it hasn’t already been set, it’s left unset. Other attributes may also be set, depending on the style.

long-short
On first use, this style uses the format ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩). The inline and display full forms are the same. The sort key is set to the short form. The name is also set to the short form through


\glsxtrlongshortname  \glsxtrlongshortname

(Similarly for other longmodifier-shortmodifier⟩ styles, unless indicated otherwise.) Any redefinition of this command must come before the abbreviations are defined as it expands on definition. Make sure you protect any commands that shouldn’t be expanded. The long form can be referenced with \the\glslongtok and the short form can be referenced with \the\glsshorttok.

The description is set to the long form. The long and short forms are separated by \glsxtrfullsep. If you want to insert material within the parentheses (such as a translation), try the long-short-user style.

long-short-sc
Like long-short but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvscfont.
long-short-sm
Like long-short but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvsmfont.
long-short-em
Like long-short but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvemfont.
long-em-short-em
New to version 1.04, this style is like long-short-em but redefines \glsfirstlongfont to use \glsfirstlongemfont.
long-only-short-only
New to version 1.17, this style only shows the long form on first use and only shows the short form on subsequent use. The inline full form \glsxtrfull shows the long form followed by the short form in parentheses. The name field is obtained from


\glsxtronlyname  \glsxtronlyname

Any redefinition of this command must come before the abbreviations are defined as it expands on definition. Make sure you protect any commands that shouldn’t be expanded. The long form can be referenced with \the\glslongtok and the short form can be referenced with \the\glsshorttok.

long-only-short-only-desc
New to version 1.17, this style is like long-only-short-only but the user must supply the description. The name field is obtained from


\glsxtronlydescname  \glsxtronlydescname

Any redefinition of this command must come before the abbreviations are defined as it expands on definition. Make sure you protect any commands that shouldn’t be expanded. The long form can be referenced with \the\glslongtok and the short form can be referenced with \the\glsshorttok.

long-em-noshort-em-noreg
New to version 1.17, this style is like long-em-noshort-em but doesn’t set the regular attribute.
long-short-user
This style was introduced in version 1.04. It’s like the long-short style but additional information can be inserted into the parenthetical material. This checks the value of the field given by


\glsxtruserfield  \glsxtruserfield

(which defaults to useri) using \ifglshasfield (provided by glossaries). If the field hasn’t been set, the style behaves like the long-short style and produces ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩) but if the field has been set, the contents of that field are inserted within the parentheses in the form ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩, ⟨field-value⟩). The format is governed by


\glsxtruserparen  \glsxtruserparen{text}{label}

where ⟨text⟩ is the short form (for the long-short-user style) or the long form (for the short-long-user style). This command first inserts a space using \glsxtrfullsep and then the parenthetical content (using \glsxtrparen). The description is set to


\glsuserdescription  \glsuserdescription{long}{label}

The default definition ignores the ⟨label⟩ and encapsulates ⟨long⟩ with \glslonguserfont.

The name is obtained by expanding \glsxtrlongshortname (see above). The ⟨text⟩ argument includes the font formatting command, \glsfirstabbrvfont {short} in the case of the long-short-user style and \glsfirstlongfont{long} in the case of the short-long-user style.

For example:

\setabbreviationstyle[acronym]{long-short-user}  
\newacronym{tug}{TUG}{\TeX\ User Group}  
\newacronym  
 [user1={German Speaking \TeX\ User Group}]  
 {dante}{DANTE}{Deutschsprachige Anwendervereinigung \TeX\ e.V}

On first use, \gls{tug} will appear as:

TEX User Group (TUG)

whereas \gls{dante} will appear as:

Deutschsprachige Anwendervereinigung TEX e.V (DANTE, German Speaking TEX User Group)

The short form is formatted according to


\glsabbrvuserfont  \glsabbrvuserfont{text}

and the plural suffix is given by


\glsxtrusersuffix  \glsxtrusersuffix

These may be redefined as appropriate. For example, if you want a smallcaps style, you can just set these commands to those used by the long-short-sc style:

\renewcommand{\glsabbruserfont}[1]{\glsabbrvscfont{#1}}  
\renewcommand{\glsxtrusersuffix}{\glsxtrscsuffix}

long-noshort-noreg
This style is like long-noshort but it doesn’t set the regular attribute.
long-noshort-desc-noreg
This style is like long-noshort-desc but it doesn’t set the regular attribute.
long-short-desc
On first use, this style uses the format ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩). The inline and display full forms are the same. The name is set to the full form. The sort key is set to ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩). Before version 1.04, this was incorrectly set to the short form. If you want to revert back to this you can redefine


\glsxtrlongshortdescsort  \glsxtrlongshortdescsort

For example:

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrlongshortdescsort}{\the\glsshorttok}

The description must be supplied by the user. The long and short forms are separated by \glsxtrfullsep. The name field is obtained from


\glsxtrlongshortdescname  \glsxtrlongshortdescname

(Similarly for other longmodifier-shortmodifier-desc styles, unless indicated otherwise.) Any redefinition of this command must come before the abbreviations are defined as it expands on definition. Make sure you protect any commands that shouldn’t be expanded. The long form can be referenced with \the\glslongtok and the short form can be referenced with \the\glsshorttok.

long-short-sc-desc
Like long-short-desc but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvscfont.
long-short-sm-desc
Like long-short-desc but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvsmfont.
long-short-em-desc
Like long-short-desc but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvemfont.
long-em-short-em-desc
New to version 1.04, this style is like long-short-em-desc but redefines \glsfirstlongfont to use \glsfirstlongemfont.
long-em-noshort-em-desc-noreg
New to version 1.17, this style is like long-em-noshort-em-desc but doesn’t set the regular attribute.
long-short-user-desc
New to version 1.04, this style is like a cross between the long-short-desc style and the long-short-user style. The display and inline forms are as for long-short-user and the name key is obtained from


\glsxtrlongshortuserdescname  \glsxtrlongshortuserdescname

Again, this should only be redefined before \newabbreviation (or \newacronym), and fragile and formatting commands need protecting.

The description key must be supplied in the optional argument of \newabbreviation (or \newacronym). The sort key is set to ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩) as per the long-short-desc style.

short-nolong-noreg
This is like short-nolong but doesn’t set the regular attribute.
nolong-short-noreg
This is like nolong-short but doesn’t set the regular attribute.
short-long
On first use, this style uses the format ⟨short⟩ (⟨long⟩). The inline and display full forms are the same. The name and sort keys are set to the short form. The description is set to the long form. The short and long forms are separated by \glsxtrfullsep. If you want to insert material within the parentheses (such as a translation), try the short-long-user style.

The name field is obtained from


\glsxtrshortlongname  \glsxtrshortlongname

(Similarly for other shortmodifier-longmodifier⟩ styles, unless indicated otherwise.) Any redefinition of this command must come before the abbreviations are defined as it expands on definition. Make sure you protect any commands that shouldn’t be expanded. The long form can be referenced with \the\glslongtok and the short form can be referenced with \the\glsshorttok.

short-sc-long
Like short-long but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvscfont.
short-sm-long
Like short-long but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvsmfont.
short-em-long
Like short-long but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvemfont.
short-em-long-em
New to version 1.04, this style is like short-em-long but redefines \glsfirstlongfont to use \glsfirstlongemfont.
short-long-user
New to version 1.04. This style is like the long-short-user style but with the long and short forms switched. The parenthetical material is governed by the same command \glsxtruserparen, but the first argument supplied to it is the long form instead of the short form. The name field is obtained by expanding


\glsxtrshortlongname  \glsxtrshortlongname

Again, this should only be redefined before \newabbreviation (or \newacronym) and commands that should be expanded need to be protected. The description is set to \glsuserdescription{long}{label}.

short-nolong-desc-noreg
This style is like short-nolong-desc but it doesn’t set the regular attribute.
short-long-desc
On first use, this style uses the format ⟨short⟩ (⟨long⟩). The inline and display full forms are the same. The name is set to the full form. The description must be supplied by the user. The short and long forms are separated by \glsxtrfullsep. The name field is obtained from


\glsxtrshortlongdescname  \glsxtrshortlongdescname

(Similarly for other shortmodifier-longmodifier-desc styles, unless indicated otherwise.) Any redefinition of this command must come before the abbreviations are defined as it expands on definition. Make sure you protect any commands that shouldn’t be expanded. The long form can be referenced with \the\glslongtok and the short form can be referenced with \the\glsshorttok.

short-sc-long-desc
Like short-long-desc but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvscfont.
short-sm-long-desc
Like short-long-desc but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvsmfont.
short-em-long-desc
Like short-long-desc but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvemfont.
short-em-long-em-desc
New to version 1.04, this style is like short-em-long-desc but redefines \glsfirstlongfont to use \glsfirstlongemfont.
short-long-user-desc
New to version 1.04, this style is like a cross between the short-long-desc style and the short-long-user style. The display and inline forms are as for short-long-user, but the name key is obtained from


\glsxtrshortlonguserdescname  \glsxtrshortlonguserdescname

Again, this should only be redefined before \newabbreviation (or \newacronym), and fragile and formatting commands need protecting.

The description key must be supplied in the optional argument of \newabbreviation (or \newacronym).

short-footnote
On first use, this style displays the short form with the long form as a footnote. This style automatically sets the nohyperfirst attribute to “true” for the supplied category, so the first use won’t be hyperlinked (but the footnote marker may be, if the hyperref package is used).

The inline full form uses the ⟨short⟩ (⟨long⟩) style. The name is set to the short form. The description is set to the long form. The name key is obtained by expanding


\glsxtrfootnotename  \glsxtrfootnotename

(Similarly for other shortmodifier-modifierfootnote styles, unless indicated otherwise.) Again, this command should only be redefined before \newabbreviation (or \newacronym), and fragile or formatting commands should be protected from expansion.

As from version 1.05, all the footnote styles use:


\glsfirstlongfootnotefont  \glsfirstlongfootnotefont{text}

to format the long form on first use or for the full form and


\glslongfootnotefont  \glslongfootnotefont{text}

to format the long form elsewhere (for example, when used with \glsxtrlong).

As from version 1.07, all the footnote styles use:


\glsxtrabbrvfootnote  \glsxtrabbrvfootnote{label}{long}

By default, this just does \footnote{long} (the first argument is ignored). For example, to make the footnote text link to the relevant place in the glossary:

\renewcommand{\glsxtrabbrvfootnote}[2]{%  
  \footnote{\glshyperlink[#2]{#1}}%  
}

or to include the short form with a hyperlink:

\renewcommand{\glsxtrabbrvfootnote}[2]{%  
  \footnote{\glshyperlink[\glsfmtshort{#1}]{#1}: #2}%  
}

Note that I haven’t used commands like \glsxtrshort to avoid interference (see §2.3 Entry Display Style Modifications and §2.7 Nested Links).

footnote
A synonym for short-footnote.
short-sc-footnote
Like short-footnote but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvscfont. (This style was originally called footnote-sc. Renamed in version 1.04, but original name retained as a deprecated synonym for backward-compatibility.)
short-sc-footnote
Like short-footnote but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvsmfont. (This style was originally called footnote-sm. Renamed in version 1.04, but original name retained as a deprecated synonym for backward-compatibility.)
short-em-footnote
Like short-footnote but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvemfont. (This style was originally called footnote-em. Renamed in version 1.04, but original name retained as a deprecated synonym for backward-compatibility.)
short-postfootnote
This is similar to the short-footnote style but doesn’t modify the category attribute. Instead it changes \glsxtrpostlinkcategory to insert the footnote after the link-text on first use. This will also defer the footnote until after any following punctuation character that’s recognised by \glsxtrifnextpunc.

The inline full form uses the ⟨short⟩ (⟨long⟩) style. The name is set to the short form. The description is set to the long form. Note that this style will change \glsxtrfull (and it’s variants) so that it fakes non-first use. (Otherwise the footnote would appear after the inline form.)

postfootnote
A synonym for short-postfootnote.
short-sc-postfootnote
Like short-postfootnote but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvscfont. (This style was originally called postfootnote-sc. Renamed in version 1.04, but original name retained as a deprecated synonym for backward-compatibility.)
short-sm-postfootnote
Like short-postfootnote but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvsmfont. (This style was originally called postfootnote-sm. Renamed in version 1.04, but original name retained as a deprecated synonym for backward-compatibility.)
short-em-postfootnote
Like short-postfootnote but redefines \glsabbrvfont to use \glsabbrvemfont. (This style was originally called postfootnote-em. Renamed in version 1.04, but original name retained as a deprecated synonym for backward-compatibility.)
short-postlong-user
This style was introduced in version 1.12. It’s like the short-long-user style but defers the parenthetical material to after the link-text. This means that you don’t have such a long hyperlink (which can cause problems for the DVI LATEX format) and it also means that the user supplied material can include a hyperlink to another location. The name key is obtained from \glsxtrshortlongname.
short-postlong-user-desc
This style was introduced in version 1.12. It’s like the above short-postlong-user style but the description must be specified. The name is obtained from \glsxtrshortlonguserdescname.
long-postshort-user
This style was introduced in version 1.12. It’s like the above short-postlong-user style but the long form is shown first and the short form is in the parenthetical material (as for long-short-user) style.
long-postshort-user-desc
This style was introduced in version 1.12. It’s like the above long-postshort-user style but the description must be specified. The name is obtained from \glsxtrlongshortuserdescname.
long-hyphen-short-hyphen
This style (new to v1.17) is designed to work with the markwords category attribute. The full form is formatted using


\glsxtrlonghyphenshort  \glsxtrlonghyphenshort{label}{long}{short} {insert}

where ⟨insert⟩ is the inserted material provided in the final optional argument of commands like \insert. If ⟨insert⟩ start with a hyphen, then this locally redefines \glsxtrwordsep to a hyphen, which means that if the markwords attribute is set then the long form will become hyphenated. (If this attribute isn’t set, there’s no alteration to the way the long form is displayed.) The name key is obtained from \glsxtrlongshortname.

Unlike the other ⟨long⟩ (⟨short⟩) type of styles, such as long-short, this style also repeats the insertion in the parenthetical part, so that the first use form is:

\glsfirstlonghyphenfont{long}insert⟩ (\glsfirstabbrvhyphenfont{short}insert⟩)

The space before the parenthetical material is actually given by \glsxtrfullsep{label} which defaults to a space. The ⟨insert⟩ may be moved into the formatting commands according to the conditional \ifglsxtrinsertinside.

For example, if ip is defined using:

\glssetcategoryattribute{english}{markwords}{true}  
\setabbreviationstyle[english]{long-hyphen-short-hyphen}  
\newabbreviation[category=english]{ip}{IP}{Internet Protocol}

then

\gls{ip}[-Adressen]

will do

Internet-Protocol-Adressen (IP-Adressen)

on first use, whereas

\gls{ip}[ Address]

will do

Internet Protocol Address (IP Address)

on first use.

Note that the hyphenation isn’t applied when using commands like \glsxtrlong. This means that

\glsxtrlong{ip}[-Adressen]

will do

Internet Protocol-Adressen

If the markwords attribute hadn’t been set, then the first use of

\gls{ip}[-Adressen]

would do

Internet Protocol-Adressen (IP-Adressen)

instead.

If the inserted material ⟨insert⟩ is likely to contain commands like \gls, then use long-hyphen-postshort-hyphen instead to avoid nested links.

If you want the short version in small-caps, you can just redefine \glsabbrvhyphenfont and \glsxtrhyphensuffix to use the small-caps versions. For example:

\renewcommand{\glsabbrvhyphenfont}{\glsabbrvscfont}  
\renewcommand{\glsxtrhyphensuffix}{\glsxtrscsuffix}

Similarly for other font-changing variations.

long-hyphen-noshort-desc-noreg
New to version 1.17, this style is like long-hyphen-short-hyphen-desc except that the parenthetical part is omitted and the long form is displayed on subsequent use. The short form can be accessed with \glsxtrshort but just uses the default abbreviation font. There’s no regular version of this style as the regular form doesn’t have the flexibility to deal with the hyphen switch. The name is obtained from \glsxtrlongnoshortdescname.
long-hyphen-noshort-noreg
New to version 1.17, this style is like long-hyphen-noshort-desc-noreg but the name is set to the short form and the description is set to the long form.
long-hyphen-short-hyphen-desc

New to version 1.17. This is similar to long-hyphen-short-hyphen but the user supplies the description. The name is obtained from \glsxtrlongshortdescname.

long-hyphen-postshort-hyphen

New to version 1.17. This is similar to long-hyphen-short-hyphen but the inserted and parenthetical material are moved to the post-link hook. On first use, \gls{label}[insert] will do
\glsxtrlonghyphen{long}{label}{insert}\glsxtrposthyphenshort {label}insert
where


\glsxtrposthyphenshort  \glsxtrposthyphenshort{label}insert

is in the post-link hook. This uses the format:
insert⟩ (\glsfirstabbrvhyphenfont{short}isnert⟩)

The singular short form is always used here, even with \glspl. (Unlike long-hyphen-long-hyphen.)

The part in the link-text on first use:


\glsxtrlonghyphen  \glsxtrlonghyphen{long}{label}{insert}

checks if ⟨insert⟩ starts with a hyphen. If it does, then \glsxtrwordsep is locally redefined to a hyphen. This command only uses ⟨insert⟩ to test if it starts with a hyphen. The actual insertion code isn’t typeset until the post-link hook and it’s also localised, which means that you can use commands like \gls in ⟨insert⟩ for this style without causing nested hyperlinks, but only for commands like \gls.

Don’t use \gls in the ⟨insert⟩ part for commands like \glsxtrfull, \glsxtrshort or \glsxtrlong.

The inline full display format used by commands like \glsxtrfull behaves differently to the first use of \gls with this style. It’s better to use \glsreset{label}\gls{label} if you want to ensure the full format.

long-hyphen-postshort-hyphen-desc

New to version 1.17. This is similar to long-hyphen-postshort-hyphen but the user supplies the description. The name is obtained from \glsxtrlongshortdescname.

short-hyphen-long-hyphen
This style (new to v1.17) is like long-hyphen-short-hyphen, except that the short form is displayed first followed by the long form in parentheses. The full form is formatted using


\glsxtrshorthyphenlong  \glsxtrshorthyphenlong{label}{short}{long} {insert}

which behaves in an analogous way to \glsxtrlonghyphenshort. The name is obtained from \glsxtrshortlongname.

short-hyphen-long-hyphen-desc

New to version 1.17. This is similar to short-hyphen-long-hyphen but the user supplies the description. The name is obtained from \glsxtrshortlongdescname.

short-hyphen-postlong-hyphen
This style (new to v1.17) is like long-hyphen-postshort-hyphen, but the short form is displayed first followed by the long form in parentheses. On first use, \gls{label}[insert] will do
\glsxtrshorthyphen{short}{label}{insert}\glsxtrposthyphenlong {label}insert
where


\glsxtrposthyphenlong  \glsxtrposthyphenlong{label}insert

is in the post-link hook. These commands behave in an analogous manner to those used with long-hyphen-postshort-hyphen. The name is obtained from \glsxtrshortlongname.

Don’t use \gls in the ⟨insert⟩ part for commands like \glsxtrfull, \glsxtrshort or \glsxtrlong.

The inline full display format used by commands like \glsxtrfull behaves differently to the first use of \gls with this style. It’s better to use \glsreset{label}\gls{label} if you want to ensure the full format.

short-hyphen-postlong-hyphen-desc

New to version 1.17. This is similar to short-hyphen-postlong-hyphen but the user supplies the description. The name is obtained from \glsxtrshortlongdescname.

Top

3.5 Defining New Abbreviation Styles

New abbreviation styles may be defined using:


\newabbreviationstyle  \newabbreviationstyle{name}{setup}{fmts}

where ⟨name⟩ is the name of the new style (as used in the mandatory argument of \setabbreviationstyle). This is similar but not identical to the glossaries package’s \newacronymstyle command.

You can’t use styles defined by \newacronymstyle with glossaries-extra unless you have reverted \newacronym back to its generic definition from glossaries (using \RestoreAcronyms). The acronym styles from the glossaries package can’t be used with abbreviations defined with \newabbreviation.

The ⟨setup⟩ argument deals with the way the entry is defined and may set attributes for the given abbreviation category. This argument should redefine


\CustomAbbreviationFields  \CustomAbbreviationFields

to set the entry fields including the name (defaults to the short form if omitted), sort, first, firstplural. Other fields may also be set, such as text, plural and description.

\CustomAbbreviationFields is expanded by \newabbreviation so take care to protect commands that shouldn’t be expanded.

For example, the long-short style has the following in ⟨setup⟩:

  \renewcommand*{\CustomAbbreviationFields}{%  
    name={\protect\glsabbrvfont{\the\glsshorttok}},  
    sort={\the\glsshorttok},  
    first={\protect\glsfirstlongfont{\the\glslongtok}%  
     \protect\glsxtrfullsep{\the\glslabeltok}%  
     \glsxtrparen{\protect\glsfirstabbrvfont{\the\glsshorttok}}},%  
    firstplural={\protect\glsfirstlongfont{\the\glslongpltok}%  
     \protect\glsxtrfullsep{\the\glslabeltok}%  
     \glsxtrparen{\protect\glsfirstabbrvfont{\the\glsshortpltok}}},%  
    plural={\protect\glsabbrvfont{\the\glsshortpltok}},%  
    description={\the\glslongtok}}%

Note that the first and firstplural are set even though they’re not used by \gls.

The basic styles, such as long-short, use commands like \glsabbrvfont (which are redefined whenever the style formatting is set) within \CustomAbbreviationFields. Other styles, such as long-em-short-em directly use their own custom commands, such as \glsabbrvemfont. With these styles, commands like \glsabbrvfont still need to be defined as appropriate in the ⟨fmts⟩ argument even if they’re not used within \CustomAbbreviationFields.

The ⟨setup⟩ argument may also redefine


\GlsXtrPostNewAbbreviation  \GlsXtrPostNewAbbreviation

which can be used to assign attributes. (This will automatically be initialised to do nothing.)

For example, the short-footnote includes the following in ⟨setup⟩:

  \renewcommand*{\GlsXtrPostNewAbbreviation}{%  
    \glssetattribute{\the\glslabeltok}{nohyperfirst}{true}%  
    \glshasattribute{\the\glslabeltok}{regular}%  
    {%  
      \glssetattribute{\the\glslabeltok}{regular}{false}%  
    }%  
    {}%  
  }%

This sets the nohyperfirst attribute to “true”. It also unsets the regular attribute if it has previously been set. Note that the nohyperfirst attribute doesn’t get unset by other styles, so take care not to switch styles for the same category.

You can access the short, long, short plural and long plural values through the following token registers.

Short value (defined by glossaries):


\glsshorttok  \glsshorttok

Short plural value (defined by glossaries-extra):


\glsshortpltok  \glsshortpltok

(This may be the default value or, if provided, the value provided by the user through the shortplural key in the optional argument of \newabbreviation.)

Long value (defined by glossaries):


\glslongtok  \glslongtok

Long plural value (defined by glossaries-extra):


\glslongpltok  \glslongpltok

(This may be the default value or, if provided, the value provided by the user through the longplural key in the optional argument of \newabbreviation.)

The short or long values may be modified by attributes (such as markwords). The above registers reflect the modification. If you want to access the original (unmodified) short or long form (as provided in the final two arguments of \newabbreviation), then use the commands:


\glsxtrorgshort  \glsxtrorgshort

for the short form and


\glsxtrorglong  \glsxtrorglong

for the long form. (These may be useful for the sort key to avoid any formatting that may be added by the attribute setting.)

There are two other registers available that are defined by glossaries:


\glslabeltok  \glslabeltok

which contains the entry’s label and


\glskeylisttok  \glskeylisttok

which contains the values provided in the optional argument of \newabbreviation.

Remember put \the in front of the register command as in the examples above. The category label can be access through the command (not a register):


\glscategorylabel  \glscategorylabel

This may be used inside the definition of \GlsXtrPostNewAbbreviation.

If you want to base a style on an existing style, you can use


\GlsXtrUseAbbrStyleSetup  \GlsXtrUseAbbrStyleSetup{name}

where ⟨name⟩ is the name of the existing style. For example, the long-noshort-sc-desc style simply does

\GlsXtrUseAbbrStyleSetup{long-noshort-desc}

within ⟨setup⟩.

The ⟨fmts⟩ argument deals with the way the entry is displayed in the document. This argument should redefine the following commands.

The default suffix for the plural short form (if not overridden by the shortplural key):


\abbrvpluralsuffix  \abbrvpluralsuffix

(Note that this isn’t used for the plural long form, which just uses the regular \glspluralsuffix.)

The font used for the short form on first use or in the full forms:


\glsfirstabbrvfont  \glsfirstabbrvfont{text}

The font used for the short form on subsequent use or through commands like \glsxtrshort:


\glsabbrvfont  \glsabbrvfont{text}

The font used for the long form on first use or in the full forms:


\glsfirstlongfont  \glsfirstlongfont{text}

The font used for the long form in commands like \glsxtrlong use:


\glslongfont  \glslongfont{text}

Display full form singular no case-change (used by \gls on first use for abbreviations without the regular attribute set):


\glsxtrfullformat  \glsxtrfullformat{label}{insert}

Display full form singular first letter converted to upper case (used by \Gls on first use for abbreviations without the regular attribute set):


\Glsxtrfullformat  \Glsxtrfullformat{label}{insert}

Display full form plural no case-change (used by \glspl on first use for abbreviations without the regular attribute set):


\glsxtrfullplformat  \glsxtrfullplformat{label}{insert}

Display full form plural first letter converted to upper case (used by \Glspl on first use for abbreviations without the regular attribute set):


\Glsxtrfullplformat  \Glsxtrfullplformat{label}{insert}

In addition ⟨fmts⟩ may also redefine the following commands that govern the inline full formats. If the style doesn’t redefine them, they will default to the same as the display full forms.

Inline singular no case-change (used by \glsentryfull, \glsxtrfull and \GLSxtrfull):


\glsxtrinlinefullformat  \glsxtrinlinefullformat{label}{insert}

Inline singular first letter converted to upper case (used by \Glsentryfull and \Glsxtrfull):


\Glsxtrinlinefullformat  \Glsxtrinlinefullformat{label}{insert}

Inline plural no case-change (used by \glsentryfullpl, \glsxtrfullpl and \GLSxtrfullpl):


\glsxtrinlinefullplformat  \glsxtrinlinefullplformat{label}{insert}

Inline plural first letter converted to upper case (used by \Glsentryfullpl and \Glsxtrfullpl):


\Glsxtrinlinefullplformat  \Glsxtrinlinefullplformat{label}{insert}

(New to version 1.17.) You can also modify the way the subsequent use is formatted by redefining the following four commands, but these won’t be used for abbreviations with the regular attribute set. If the style doesn’t redefine these commands, the default values are used.

Singular with no case-change:


\glsxtrsubsequentfmt  \glsxtrsubsequentfmt{label}{insert}

Singular with first letter upper case:


\Glsxtrsubsequentfmt  \Glsxtrsubsequentfmt{label}{insert}

Plural with no case-change:


\glsxtrsubsequentplfmt  \glsxtrsubsequentplfmt{label}{insert}

Plural with first letter upper case:


\Glsxtrsubsequentplfmt  \Glsxtrsubsequentplfmt{label}{insert}

If you want to provide support for glossaries-accsupp use the following \glsaccessxxx⟩ commands (§11.2 Accessibility Support) within the definitions of \glsxtrfullformat etc instead of the analogous \glsentryxxx⟩ commands. (If you don’t use glossaries-accsupp, they will just do the corresponding \glsentryxxx⟩ command.)

For example, the short-long style has the following in ⟨fmts⟩:

  \renewcommand*{\abbrvpluralsuffix}{\glsxtrabbrvpluralsuffix}%  
  \renewcommand*{\glsabbrvfont}[1]{\glsabbrvdefaultfont{##1}}%  
  \renewcommand*{\glsfirstabbrvfont}[1]{\glsfirstabbrvdefaultfont{##1}}%  
  \renewcommand*{\glsfirstlongfont}[1]{\glsfirstlongdefaultfont{##1}}%  
  \renewcommand*{\glslongfont}[1]{\glslongdefaultfont{##1}}%  
  \renewcommand*{\glsxtrfullformat}[2]{%  
    \glsfirstabbrvfont{\glsaccessshort{##1}\ifglsxtrinsertinside##2\fi}%  
    \ifglsxtrinsertinside\else##2\fi  
    \glsxtrfullsep{##1}%  
    \glsxtrparen{\glsfirstlongfont{\glsaccesslong{##1}}}%  
  }%  
  \renewcommand*{\glsxtrfullplformat}[2]{%  
    \glsfirstabbrvfont{\glsaccessshortpl{##1}\ifglsxtrinsertinside##2\fi}%  
    \ifglsxtrinsertinside\else##2\fi  
    \glsxtrfullsep{##1}%  
    \glsxtrparen{\glsfirstlongfont{\glsaccesslongpl{##1}}}%  
  }%  
  \renewcommand*{\Glsxtrfullformat}[2]{%  
    \glsfirstabbrvfont{\Glsaccessshort{##1}\ifglsxtrinsertinside##2\fi}%  
    \ifglsxtrinsertinside\else##2\fi\glsxtrfullsep{##1}%  
    \glsxtrparen{\glsfirstlongfont{\glsaccesslong{##1}}}%  
  }%  
  \renewcommand*{\Glsxtrfullplformat}[2]{%  
    \glsfirstabbrvfont{\Glsaccessshortpl{##1}\ifglsxtrinsertinside##2\fi}%  
     \ifglsxtrinsertinside\else##2\fi\glsxtrfullsep{##1}%  
    \glsxtrparen{\glsfirstlongfont{\glsaccesslongpl{##1}}}%  
  }%

Since the inline full commands aren’t redefined, they default to the same as the display versions.

If you want to base a style on an existing style, you can use


\GlsXtrUseAbbrStyleFmts  \GlsXtrUseAbbrStyleFmts{name}

within ⟨fmts⟩, where ⟨name⟩ is the name of the existing style. For example, the long-short-desc style has the following in ⟨fmts⟩:

  \GlsXtrUseAbbrStyleFmts{long-short}%

Here’s an example of an abbreviation style that’s based on long-short that displays the short form within \textsf:

\newabbreviationstyle  
{custom-sf}% label  
{% setup  
  \GlsXtrUseAbbrStyleSetup{short-long}%  
}%  
{% fmts  
  \GlsXtrUseAbbrStyleFmts{short-long}%  
  \renewcommand*{\glsabbrvfont}[1]{\textsf{##1}}%  
}

Note that this wouldn’t work if it was instead based on one of the modified versions such as short-sc-long as they explicitly use their own formatting commands, such as \glsabbrvemfont. The base styles, such as short-long, use the more generic \glsabbrvfont etc which makes them easier to adapt than the modified styles.

For further details, see the “Abbreviations” section in the documented code (glossaries-extra-code.pdf).

Top

4. Entries in Sectioning Titles, Headers, Captions and Contents

The glossaries user manual cautions against using commands like \gls in chapter or section titles. The principle problems are:

Similar problems can also occur with captions (except for the page header and bookmark issues).

To get around all these problems, the glossaries user manual recommends using the expandable non-hyperlink commands, such as \glsentrytext (for regular entries) or \glsentryshort (for abbreviations). This is the simplest solution, but doesn’t allow for special formatting that’s applied to the entry through commands like \glstext or \glsxtrshort. This means that if, for example, you are using one of the abbreviation styles that uses \textsc then the short form displayed with \glsentryshort won’t use small caps. If you only have one abbreviation style in use, you can explicitly enclose \glsentryshort{label} in the argument of \glsabbrvfont, like this:

\chapter{A Chapter about \glsabbrvfont{\glsentryshort{html}}}

Or, if you are using hyperref:

\chapter{A Chapter about  
\texorpdfstring{\glsabbrvfont{\glsentryshort{html}}}{\glsentryshort{html}}}

Since this is a bit cumbersome, you might want to define a new command to do this for you. However, if you have mixed styles this won’t work as commands like \gls and \glsxtrshort redefine \glsabbrvfont to match the entry’s style before displaying it. In this case, the above example doesn’t take into account the shifting definitions of \glsabbrvfont and will use whatever happens to be the last abbreviation style in use. More complicated solutions interfere with the upper casing used by the standard page styles that display the chapter or section title in the page header using \MakeUppercase.

The glossaries-extra package tries to resolve this by modifying \markright and \markboth and \@starttoc. If you don’t like this change, you can restore their former definitions using


\glsxtrRevertMarks  \glsxtrRevertMarks

If you only want to restore \@starttoc you can use:


\glsxtrRevertTocMarks  \glsxtrRevertTocMarks

If you restore the header or table of contents commands, you’ll have to use the glossaries manual’s recommendations of either simply using \glsentryshort (as above) or use the sectioning command’s option argument to provide an alternative for the table of contents and page header. For example:

\chapter[A Chapter about \glsentryshort{html}]{A Chapter about \gls{html}}

Alternatively, you need to find a way to insert \glsxtrmarkhook and \@glsxtrinmark at the start of the header or table of contents either scoped or afterwards cancelled with \@glsxtrnotinmark and \glsxtrrestoremarkhook.

If you don’t revert the mark commands back with \glsxtrRevertMarks, you can use the commands described below in the argument of sectioning commands. You can still use them even if the mark commands have been reverted, but only where they don’t conflict with the page style.

The commands listed below all use \texorpdfstring if hyperref has been loaded so that the expandable non-formatted version is added to the PDF bookmarks. Note that since the commands that convert the first letter to upper case aren’t expandable, the non-case-changing version is used for the bookmarks.

These commands essentially behave as though you have used \glsxtrshort (or equivalent) with the options noindex and hyper=false. The text produced won’t be converted to upper case in the page headings by default. If you want the text converted to upper case you need to set the headuc attribute to “true” for the appropriate category.

If you use one of the \textsc styles, be aware that the default fonts don’t provide bold small-caps or italic small-caps. This means that if the chapter or section title style uses bold, this may override the small-caps setting, in which case the abbreviation will just appear as lower case bold. If the heading style uses italic, the abbreviation may appear in upright small-caps, even if you have set the headuc attribute since the all-capitals form still uses \glsabbrvfont. You may want to consider using the slantsc package in this case.

Display the short form:


\glsfmtshort  \glsfmtshort{label}

Display the plural short form:


\glsfmtshortpl  \glsfmtshortpl{label}

First letter upper case singular short form:


\Glsfmtshort  \Glsfmtshort{label}

(No case-change applied to PDF bookmarks.)

First letter upper case plural short form:


\Glsfmtshortpl  \Glsfmtshortpl{label}

(No case-change applied to PDF bookmarks.)

Display the long form:


\glsfmtlong  \glsfmtlong{label}

Display the plural long form:


\glsfmtlongpl  \glsfmtlongpl{label}

First letter upper case singular long form:


\Glsfmtlong  \Glsfmtlong{label}

(No case-change applied to PDF bookmarks.)

First letter upper case plural long form:


\Glsfmtlongpl  \Glsfmtlongpl{label}

(No case-change applied to PDF bookmarks.)

There are similar commands for the full form, but note that these use the inline full form, which may be different from the full form used by \gls.

Display the full form:


\glsfmtfull  \glsfmtfull{label}

Display the plural full form:


\glsfmtfullpl  \glsfmtfullpl{label}

First letter upper case singular full form:


\Glsfmtfull  \Glsfmtfull{label}

(No case-change applied to PDF bookmarks.)

First letter upper case plural full form:


\Glsfmtfullpl  \Glsfmtfullpl{label}

(No case-change applied to PDF bookmarks.)

There are also equivalent commands for the value of the text field:


\glsfmttext  \glsfmttext{label}

First letter converted to upper case:


\Glsfmttext  \Glsfmttext{label}

(No case-change applied to PDF bookmarks.)

The plural equivalents:


\glsfmtplural  \glsfmtplural{label}

and


\Glsfmtplural  \Glsfmtplural{label}

Likewise for the value of the name field:


\glsfmtname  \glsfmtname{label}

First letter converted to upper case:


\Glsfmtname  \Glsfmtname{label}

(No case-change applied to PDF bookmarks.)

Similarly for the value of the first field:


\glsfmtfirst  \glsfmtfirst{label}

First letter converted to upper case:


\Glsfmtfirst  \Glsfmtfirst{label}

(No case-change applied to PDF bookmarks.)

The plural equivalents:


\glsfmtfirstpl  \glsfmtfirstpl{label}

and


\Glsfmtfirstpl  \Glsfmtfirstpl{label}

Top

5. Categories

Each entry defined by \newglossaryentry (or commands that internally use it such as \newabbreviation) is assigned a category through the category key. You may add any category that you like, but since the category is a label used in the creation of some control sequences, avoid problematic characters within the category label. (So take care if you have babel shorthands on that make some characters active.)

The use of categories can give you more control over the way entries are displayed in the text or glossary. Note that an entry’s category is independent of the glossary type. Be careful not to confuse category with type.

The default category assumed by \newglossaryentry is labelled general. Abbreviations defined with \newabbreviation have the category set to abbreviation by default. Abbreviations defined with \newacronym have the category set to acronym by default.

Additionally, if you have enabled \newterm with the index package option that command will set the category to index by default. If you have enabled \glsxtrnewsymbol with the symbols package option, that command will set the category to symbol. If you have enabled \glsxtrnewnumber with the numbers package option, that command will set the category to number.

You can obtain the category label for a given entry using


\glscategory  \glscategory{label}

This is equivalent to commands like \glsentryname and so may be used in an expandable context. No error is generated if the entry doesn’t exist.

You can test the category for a given entry using


\glsifcategory  \glsifcategory{entry-label}{category-label}{true part}{false part}

This is equivalent to

\ifglsfieldeq{entry-label}{category}{category-label}{true
part}{false part}
so any restrictions that apply to \ifglsfieldeq also apply to \glsifcategory.

Each category may have a set of attributes. For example, the general and acronym categories have the attribute regular set to “true” to indicate that all entries with either of those categories are regular entries (as opposed to abbreviations). This attribute is accessed by \glsentryfmt to determine whether to use \glsgenentryfmt or \glsxtrgenabbrvfmt.

Other attributes recognised by glossaries-extra are:

nohyperfirst
When using commands like \gls this will automatically suppress the hyperlink on first use for entries with a category that has this attribute set to “true”. (This settings can be overridden by explicitly setting the hyper key on or off in the optional argument of commands like \gls.) As from version 1.07, \glsfirst, \Glsfirst, \GLSfirst and their plural versions (which should ideally behave in a similar way to the first use of \gls or \glspl) now honour this attribute (but not the package-wide hyperfirst=false option, which matches the behaviour of glossaries). If you want commands these \glsfirst etc commands to ignore the nohyperfirst attribute then just redefine


\glsxtrchecknohyperfirst  \glsxtrchecknohyperfirst{label}

to do nothing.

nohyper
When using commands like \gls this will automatically suppress the hyperlink for entries with a category that has this attribute set to “true”. (This settings can be overridden by explicitly setting the hyper key on or off in the optional argument of commands like \gls.)
indexonlyfirst
This is similar to the indexonlyfirst package option but only for entries that have a category with this attribute set to “true”.
wrgloss
When using commands like \gls, if this attribute is set to “after”, it will automatically implement wrgloss=after. (New to v1.14.)
discardperiod
If set to “true”, the post-link-text hook will discard a full stop (period) that follows non-plural commands like \gls or \glstext. (Provided for entries such as abbreviations that end with a full stop.) This attribute is only applicable to entries defined using \newabbreviation (or \newacronym if it’s using \newabbreviation.) This attribute doesn’t apply to the accessibility fields.

Note that this can cause a problem if you access a field that doesn’t end with a full stop. For example:

\newabbreviation  
 [user1={German Speaking \TeX\ User Group}]  
 {dante}{DANTE e.V.}{Deutschsprachige Anwendervereinigung \TeX\  
e.V.}

Here the short and long fields end with a full stop, but the user1 field doesn’t. The simplest solution in this situation is to put the sentence terminator in the final optional argument. For example:

\glsuseri{dante}[.]

This will bring the punctuation character inside the link-text and it won’t be discarded.

pluraldiscardperiod
If this attribute is set to “true” and the discardperiod attribute is set to “true”, this will behave as above for the plural commands like \glspl or \glsplural. This attribute is only applicable to entries defined using \newabbreviation (or \newacronym if it’s using \newabbreviation.)
retainfirstuseperiod
If this attribute is set to “true” then the full stop won’t be discarded for first use instances, even if discardperiod or pluraldiscardperiod are set. This is useful for ⟨short⟩ (⟨long⟩) abbreviation styles where only the short form has a trailing full stop. This attribute is only applicable to entries defined using \newabbreviation (or \newacronym if it’s using \newabbreviation.) This attribute doesn’t apply to the accessibility fields.
markwords
If this attribute is set to “true” any entry defined using \newabbreviation will automatically have spaces in the long form replaced with


\glsxtrwordsep  \glsxtrwordsep

and each word is encapsulated with


\glsxtrword  \glsxtrword{word}

For example:

\glssetcategoryattribute{abbreviation}{markwords}{true}  
\newabbreviation{ip}{IP}{Internet Protocol}

is essentially the same as

\newabbreviation{ip}{IP}  
{\glsxtrword{Internet}\glsxtrwordsep\glsxtrword{Protocol}}

The “hyphen” styles, such as long-hyphen-short-hyphen, take advantage of this markup. If the inserted material (provided in the final argument of commands like \gls) starts with a hyphen then \glsxtrwordsep is locally redefined to a hyphen. (The default value is a space). Note that this only applies to commands like \gls and not like \glsxtrlong. You can provide your own localised switch, if required. For example:

\newcommand{\hyplong}[2][]{%  
 {\def\glsxtrwordsep{-}\glsxtrlong[#1]{#2}}}

This setting will also adjust the long plural. This attribute is only applicable to entries defined using \newabbreviation (or \newacronym if it’s using \newabbreviation.)

This setting may result in the \glsxtrword and \glsxtrwordsep markup ending up in the sort field, depending on the style in use.

markshortwords
This is similar to markwords but applies to the short form. (Only useful for abbreviations that contain spaces.) This attribute is only applicable to entries defined using \newabbreviation (or \newacronym if it’s using \newabbreviation.)

This setting will only adjust the short plural if the shortplural key isn’t used. This setting will take precedence over insertdots.

This setting may result in the \glsxtrword and \glsxtrwordsep markup ending up in the sort field, depending on the style in use.

insertdots
If this attribute is set to “true” any entry defined using \newabbreviation will automatically have full stops (periods) inserted after each letter. The entry will be defined with those dots present as though they had been present in the ⟨short⟩ argument of \newabbreviation (rather than inserting them every time the entry is used). The short plural form defaults to the new dotted version of the original ⟨short⟩ form with the plural suffix appended. This setting is incompatible with markshortwords. This attribute is only applicable to entries defined using \newabbreviation (or \newacronym if it’s using \newabbreviation.)

If you explicitly override the short plural using the shortplural key, you must explicitly insert the dots yourself (since there’s no way for the code to determine if the plural has a suffix that shouldn’t be followed by a dot).

This attribute is best used with the discardperiod attribute set to “true”.

aposplural
If this attribute is set to “true”, \newabbreviation will insert an apostrophe (’) before the plural suffix for the short plural form (unless explicitly overridden with the shortplural key). The long plural form is unaffected by this setting. This setting overrides noshortplural. This attribute is only applicable to entries defined using \newabbreviation (or \newacronym if it’s using \newabbreviation.) Check with your supervisor, publisher or editor if you want to use this attribute as this usage is controversial.
noshortplural
If this attribute is set to “true”, \newabbreviation won’t append the plural suffix for the short plural form. This means the short and shortplural values will be the same unless explicitly overridden. This setting is incompatible with aposplural. This attribute is only applicable to entries defined using \newabbreviation (or \newacronym if it’s using \newabbreviation.)
accessinsertdots
If this attribute is set to “true” and the glossaries-accsupp package has been loaded (with the accsupp option), then this behaves like insertdots but for the shortaccess field instead of the short field. This can be used to assist the screen reader for initialisms that should be read out letter by letter rather than as a word. For example:
\glssetcategoryattribute{initialism}{accessinsertdots}{true}  
\newabbreviation[category=initialism]{pi}{PI}{Private Investigator}

This setting will be overridden by an explicit use of the shortaccess key in the optional argument of \newabbreviation (or \newacronym). This attribute is only applicable to entries defined using \newabbreviation (or \newacronym if it’s using \newabbreviation.)

nameshortaccess
If this attribute is set to “true”, the access field (used for the name field’s accessibility support) is set to the shortaccess value. This attribute has no effect if there’s no accessibility support or if the shortaccess field hasn’t been assigned or if the access field is used explicitly. This attribute is only applicable to entries defined using \newabbreviation (or \newacronym if it’s using \newabbreviation.)
textshortaccess
Like nameshortaccess but applies to the textaccess field (for use with regular abbreviations).
firstshortaccess
Like nameshortaccess but applies to the firstaccess field (for use with regular abbreviations).
accessaposplural
This boolean attribute overrides aposplural for the shortpluralaccess key. Has no effect if there’s no accessibility support or if the shortaccess key hasn’t been set or if the shortpluralaccess key is explicitly set. If the aposplural is set and this attribute isn’t set and the shortaccess key is set, then the aposplural setting governs the default shortpluralaccess setting. If you want aposplural but don’t want it applied to the accessibility support, set the accessaposplural attribute to “false”. This attribute is only applicable to entries defined using \newabbreviation (or \newacronym if it’s using \newabbreviation.)
accessnoshortplural
This boolean attribute overrides noshortplural for the shortpluralaccess key. The same conditions apply as for accessaposplural. This attribute is only applicable to entries defined using \newabbreviation (or \newacronym if it’s using \newabbreviation.)
headuc
If this attribute is set to “true”, commands like \glsfmtshort will use the upper case version in the page headers.
tagging
If this attribute is set to “true”, the tagging command defined by \GlsXtrEnableInitialTagging will be activated to use \glsxtrtagfont in the glossary (see §3.1 Tagging Initials).
entrycount
Unlike the above attributes, this attribute isn’t boolean but instead must be an integer value and is used in combination with \glsenableentrycount (see §2.4 Entry Counting Modifications). Leave blank or undefined for categories that shouldn’t have this facility enabled. The value of this attribute is used by \glsxtrifcounttrigger to determine how commands such as \cgls should behave.

With glossaries, commands like \cgls use \cglsformat only if the previous usage count for that entry was equal to 1. With glossaries-extra the test is now for entries that have the entrycount attribute set and where the previous usage count for that entry is less than or equal to the value of that attribute.

linkcount
This attribute is set to true by \GlsXtrEnableLinkCounting (see §6.2 Link Counting).
linkcountmaster
This attribute is set to the name of the master counter by \GlsXtrEnableLinkCounting if the optional argument is provided (see §6.2 Link Counting).
glossdesc
The \glossentrydesc command (used in the predefined glossary styles) is modified by glossaries-extra to check for this attribute. The attribute may have one of the following values:
  • firstuc: the first letter of the description will be converted to upper case (using \Glsentrydesc).
  • title: the description will be used in the argument of the title casing command \capitalisewords (provided by mfirstuc). If you want to use a different command you can redefine:


    \glsxtrfieldtitlecasecs  \glsxtrfieldtitlecasecs{phrase cs}

    For example:

    \newcommand*{\glsxtrfieldtitlecasecs}[1]{\xcapitalisefmtwords*{#1}}

    (Note that the argument to \glsxtrfieldtitlecasecs will be a control sequence whose replacement text is the entry’s description, which is why \xcapitalisefmtwords is needed instead of \capitalisefmtwords.)

Any other values of this attribute are ignored. Remember that there are design limitations for both the first letter uppercasing and the title casing commands. See the mfirstuc user manual for further details.

glossdescfont
(New to version 1.04) In addition to the above, the modified \glossentrydesc command also checks this attribute. If set, it should be the name of a control sequence (without the leading backslash) that takes one argument. This control sequence will be applied to the description text. For example:
\glssetcategoryattribute{general}{glossdescfont}{emph}

glossname
As glossdesc but applies to \glossentryname. Additionally, if this attribute is set to “uc” the name is converted to all capitals.
indexname
If set, the \glsxtrpostnamehook hook used at the end of \glossentryname will index the entry using \index. See §7 Auto-Indexing for further details.
glossnamefont
(New to version 1.04) In addition to the above, the modified \glossentryname command also checks this attribute. If set, it should be the name of a control sequence (without the leading backslash) that takes one argument. This control sequence will be applied to the name text. For example:
\glssetcategoryattribute{general}{glossnamefont}{emph}

Note that this overrides \glsnamefont which will only be used if this attribute hasn’t been set.

Remember that glossary styles may additionally apply a font change, such as the list styles which put the name in the optional argument of \item.

textformat
(New to version 1.21.) Commands like \gls and \glstext have the link text encapsulated in the argument of \glstextformat by default. If this attribute is set, the control sequence given by the attribute value will be used instead. As with the above, the attribute value should be the name (without the leading backslash) of a command that takes a single argument (the link text). Remember that the abbreviation styles may apply an additional font change.
hyperoutside
(New to v1.21.) The attribute value may be false, true or unset. If unset, true is assumed. This indicates the default setting of the hyperoutside key, described in §2.1 Entry Indexing.
dualindex
If set, whenever a glossary entry has information written to the external glossary file through commands like \gls and \glsadd, a corresponding line will be written to the indexing file using \index. See §7 Auto-Indexing for further details.
targeturl
If set, the hyperlink generated by commands like \gls will be set to the URL provided by this attributes value. For example:
\glssetcategoryattribute{general}{targeturl}{master-doc.pdf}

(See also the accompanying sample file sample-external.tex.) If the URL contains awkward characters (such as % or ~) remember that the base glossaries package provides commands like \glspercentchar and \glstildechar that expand to literal characters.

If you want to a named anchor within the target URL (notionally adding #name⟩ to the URL), then you also need to set targetname to the anchor ⟨name⟩. You may use \glslabel within ⟨name⟩ which is set by commands like \gls to the entry’s label.

All the predefined glossary styles start each entry listing with \glstarget which sets the anchor to \glolinkprefix\glslabel, so if you want entries to link to glossaries in the URL given by targeturl, you can just do:

\glssetcategoryattribute{general}{targetname}{\glolinkprefix\glslabel}

(If the target document changed \glolinkprefix then you will need to adjust the above as appropriate.)

If the anchor is in the form ⟨name1.name2⟩ then use targetname for the ⟨name2⟩ part and targetcategory for the ⟨name1⟩ part.

For example:

\glssetcategoryattribute{general}{targeturl}{master-doc.pdf}  
\glssetcategoryattribute{general}{targetcategory}{page}  
\glssetcategoryattribute{general}{targetname}{7}

will cause all link text for general entries to link to master-doc.pdf#page.7 (page 7 of that PDF).

If you want a mixture in your document of entries that link to an internal glossary and entries that link to an external URL then you can use the starred form of \newignoredglossary for the external list. For example:

\newignoredglossary*{external}  
\glssetcategoryattribute{external}{targeturl}{master-doc.pdf}  
\glssetcategoryattribute{general}{targetname}{\glolinkprefix\glslabel}  
\newglossaryentry{sample}{name={sample},description={local example}}  
\newglossaryentry{sample2}{name={sample2},  
  type=external,  
  category=external,  
  description={external example}}

An attribute can be set using:


\glssetcategoryattribute  \glssetcategoryattribute{category-label} {attribute-label}{value}

where ⟨category-label⟩ is the category label, ⟨attribute-label⟩ is the attribute label and ⟨value⟩ is the new value for the attribute.

There is a shortcut version to set the regular attribute to “true”:


\glssetregularcategory  \glssetregularcategory{category-label}

If you need to lookup the category label for a particular entry, you can use the shortcut command:


\glssetattribute  \glssetattribute{entry-label}{attribute-label} {value}

This uses \glssetcategoryattribute with \glscategory to set the attribute. Note that this will affect all other entries that share this entry’s category.

You can fetch the value of an attribute for a particular category using:


\glsgetcategoryattribute  \glsgetcategoryattribute{category-label} {attribute-label}

Again there is a shortcut if you need to lookup the category label for a given entry:


\glsgetattribute  \glsgetattribute{entry-label}{attribute-label}

You can test if an attribute has been assigned to a given category using:


\glshascategoryattribute  \glshascategoryattribute{category-label} {attribute-label}{true code}{false code}

This uses etoolbox’s \ifcsvoid and does ⟨true code⟩ if the attribute has been set and isn’t blank and isn’t \relax. The shortcut if you need to lookup the category label from an entry is:


\glshasattribute  \glshasattribute{entry-label}{attribute-label}{true code}{false code}

You can test the value of an attribute for a particular category using:


\glsifcategoryattribute  \glsifcategoryattribute{category-label} {attribute-label}{value} {true-part}{false-part}

This tests if the attribute (given by ⟨attribute-label⟩) for the category (given by ⟨category-label⟩) is set and equal to ⟨value⟩. If true, ⟨true-part⟩ is done. If the attribute isn’t set or is set but isn’t equal to ⟨value⟩, ⟨false part⟩ is done.

For example:

\glsifcategoryattribute{general}{nohyper}{true}{NO HYPER}{HYPER}

This does “NO HYPER” if the general category has the nohyper attribute set to true otherwise if does “HYPER”.

With boolean-style attributes like nohyper, make sure you always test for true not false in case the attribute hasn’t been set.

Again there’s a shortcut if you need to lookup the category label from a particular entry:


\glsifattribute  \glsifattribute{entry-label}{attribute-label}{value} {true-part} {false-part}

There’s also a shortcut to determine if a particular category has the regular attribute set to “true”:


\glsifregularcategory  \glsifregularcategory{category-label} {true-part}{false-part}

Alternatively, if you need to lookup the category for a particular entry:


\glsifregular  \glsifregular{entry-label}{true-part}{false-part}

Note that if the regular attribute hasn’t be set, the above do ⟨false-part⟩. There are also reverse commands that test if the regular attribute has been set to “false”:


\glsifnotregularcategory  \glsifnotregularcategory{category-label} {true-part}{false-part}

or for a particular entry:


\glsifnotregular  \glsifnotregular{entry-label}{true-part}{false-part}

Again, if the regular attribute hasn’t been set, the above do ⟨false-part⟩, so these reverse commands aren’t logically opposite in the strict sense.

You can iterate through all entries with a given category using:


\glsforeachincategory[glossary-labels]{category-label} {glossary-cs} {label-cs}{body}

This iterates through all entries in the glossaries identified by the comma-separated list ⟨glossary-labels⟩ that have the category given by ⟨category-label⟩ and performs ⟨body⟩ for each match. Within ⟨body⟩, you can use ⟨glossary-cs⟩ and ⟨label-cs⟩ (which much be control sequences) to access the current glossary and entry label. If ⟨glossary-labels⟩ is omitted, all glossaries are assumed.

Similarly, you can iterate through all entries that have a category with a given attribute using:


\glsforeachwithattribute  \glsforeachwithattribute[glossary-labels] {attribute-label} {attribute-value}{glossary-cs}{label-cs}{body}

This will do ⟨body⟩ for each entry that has a category with the attribute ⟨attribute-label⟩ set to ⟨attribute-value⟩. The remaining arguments are as the previous command.

You can change the category for a particular entry using the standard glossary field changing commands, such as \glsfielddef. Alternatively, you can use


\glsxtrsetcategory  \glsxtrsetcategory{entry-labels}{category-label}

This will change the category to ⟨category-label⟩ for each entry listed in the comma-separated list ⟨entry-labels⟩. This command uses \glsfieldxdef so it will expand ⟨category-label⟩ and make the change global.

You can also change the category for all entries with a glossary or glossaries using:


\glsxtrsetcategoryforall  \glsxtrsetcategoryforall{glossary-labels} {category-label}

where ⟨glossary-labels⟩ is a comma-separated list of glossary labels.

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6. Counting References

There are three basic ways of counting entry references:

  1. Counting the total number of times \glsunset is used (\glsreset resets the count and is best avoided). This is provided by the base glossaries package and is intended for documents where the term should be displayed differently if it’s only been used a certain number of times. The information has to be written to the .aux file so that it’s available on the next LATEX run.

    This method is extended by glossaries-extra and is described in §6.1 Entry Counting (First Use Flag).

  2. Counting the total number of records. This method is only available with bib2gls and is intended for documents where the term should be displayed differently if it’s only been recorded (indexed) a certain number of times. See §9.5 Record Counting for further details.
  3. Counting the number of times the \gls-like or \glstext-like commands are used. (That is, those commands that internally use \@gls@link.) Unlike the other two methods, this just provides a running total rather than the total from the previous LATEX run. This method is intended to make it more convenient to work with hooks like \glslinkcheckfirsthyperhook, \glslinkpostsetkeys or \glslinkpresetkeys. See §6.2 Link Counting for further details.

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6.1 Entry Counting (First Use Flag)

As mentioned in §2.4 Entry Counting Modifications, glossaries-extra modifies the \glsenableentrycount command to allow for the entrycount attribute. This means that you not only need to enable entry counting with \glsenableentrycount, but you also need to set the appropriate attribute (see §5 Categories).

Remember that entry counting only counts the number of times an entry is used by commands that change the first use flag. (That is, all those commands that mark the entry as having been used.) There are many commands that don’t modify this flag and they won’t contribute to the entry use count.

With glossaries-extra, you may use \cgls instead of \gls even if you haven’t enabled entry counting. You will only get a warning if you use \glsenableentrycount without setting the entrycount attribute. (With glossaries, commands like \cgls will generate a warning if \glsenableentrycount hasn’t been used.) The abbreviation shortcut \ab uses \cgls (see §3.3 Shortcut Commands). The acronym shortcut \ac uses \cgls if it’s been defined with shortcuts=ac (or shortcuts=all) but uses \gls if it’s been defined with shortcuts=acronyms (or shortcuts=acro).

All upper case versions (not provided by glossaries) are also available:


\cGLS  \cGLS[options]{label}[insert]

and


\cGLSpl  \cGLSpl[options]{label}[insert]

These are analogous to \cgls and \cglspl but they use


\cGLSformat  \cGLSformat{label}{insert}

and


\cGLSplformat  \cGLSplformat{label}{insert}

which convert the analogous \cglsformat and \cglsplformat to upper case.

Just using glossaries:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage{glossaries}  
\makeglossaries  
\glsenableentrycount  
\newacronym{html}{HTML}{hypertext markup language}  
\newacronym{xml}{XML}{extensible markup language}  
\begin{document}  
Used once: \cgls{html}.  
Used twice: \cgls{xml} and \cgls{xml}.  
\printglossaries  
\end{document}

If you switch to glossaries-extra you must set the entrycount attribute:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\makeglossaries  
\glsenableentrycount  
\glssetcategoryattribute{abbreviation}{entrycount}{1}  
\newabbreviation{html}{HTML}{hypertext markup language}  
\newabbreviation{xml}{XML}{extensible markup language}  
\begin{document}  
Used once: \cgls{html}.  
Used twice: \cgls{xml} and \cgls{xml}.  
\printglossaries  
\end{document}

When activated with \glsenableentrycount, commands such as \cgls now use


\glsxtrifcounttrigger  \glsxtrifcounttrigger{label}{trigger code} {normal code}

to determine if the entry trips the entry count trigger. The ⟨trigger code⟩ uses commands like \cglsformat and unsets the first use flag. The ⟨normal code⟩ is the code that would ordinarily be performed by whatever the equivalent command is (for example, \cgls will use \cglsformat in ⟨trigger code⟩ but the usual \gls behaviour in ⟨normal code⟩).

The default definition is:

\newcommand*{\glsxtrifcounttrigger}[3]{%  
 \glshasattribute{#1}{entrycount}%  
 {%  
   \ifnum\glsentryprevcount{#1}>\glsgetattribute{#1}{entrycount}\relax  
    #3%  
   \else  
    #2%  
   \fi  
 }%  
 {#3}%  
}

This means that if an entry is assigned to a category that has the entrycount attribute then the ⟨trigger code⟩ will be used if the previous count value (the number of times the entry was used on the last run) is greater than the value of the attribute.

For example, to trigger normal use if the previous count value is greater than four:

\glssetcategoryattribute{abbreviation}{entrycount}{4}

There is a convenient command provided to enable entry counting, set the entrycount attribute and redefine \gls, etc to use \cgls etc:


\GlsXtrEnableEntryCounting  \GlsXtrEnableEntryCounting{categories} {value}

The first argument ⟨categories⟩ is a comma-separated list of categories. For each category, the entrycount attribute is set to ⟨value⟩. In addition, this does:

\renewcommand*{\gls}{\cgls}%  
\renewcommand*{\Gls}{\cGls}%  
\renewcommand*{\glspl}{\cglspl}%  
\renewcommand*{\Glspl}{\cGlspl}%  
\renewcommand*{\GLS}{\cGLS}%  
\renewcommand*{\GLSpl}{\cGLSpl}%

This makes it easier to enable entry-counting on existing documents.

If you use \GlsXtrEnableEntryCounting more than once, subsequent uses will just set the entrycount attribute for each listed category.

The above example document can then become:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\makeglossaries  
\GlsXtrEnableEntryCounting{abbreviation}{1}  
\newabbreviation{html}{HTML}{hypertext markup language}  
\newabbreviation{xml}{XML}{extensible markup language}  
\begin{document}  
Used once: \gls{html}.  
Used twice: \gls{xml} and \gls{xml}.  
\printglossaries  
\end{document}

The standard entry-counting function describe above counts the number of times an entry has been marked as used throughout the document. (The reset commands will reset the total back to zero.) If you prefer to count per sectional-unit, you can use


\GlsXtrEnableEntryUnitCounting  \GlsXtrEnableEntryUnitCounting {categories}{value}{counter-name}

where ⟨categories⟩ is a comma-separated list of categories to which this feature should be applied, ⟨value⟩ is the trigger value and ⟨counter-name⟩ is the name of the counter used by the sectional unit.

Due to the asynchronous nature of TEX’s output routine, discrepancies will occur in page spanning paragraphs if you use the page counter.

Note that you can’t use both the document-wide counting and the per-unit counting in the same document.

The counter value is used as part of a label, which means that \thecounter-name⟩ needs to be expandable. Since hyperref also has a similar requirement and provides \theHcounter-name⟩ as an expandable alternative, glossaries-extra will use \theHcounter-name⟩ if it exists otherwise it will use \thecounter-name⟩.

The per-unit counting function uses two attributes: entrycount (as before) and unitcount (the name of the counter).

Both the original document-wide counting mechanism and the per-unit counting mechanism provide a command that can be used to access the current count value for this run:


\glsentrycurrcount  \glsentrycurrcount{label}

and the final value from the previous run:


\glsentryprevcount  \glsentryprevcount{label}

In the case of the per-unit counting, this is the final value for the current unit. In both commands ⟨label⟩ is the entry’s label.

The per-unit counting mechanism additionally provides:


\glsentryprevtotalcount  \glsentryprevtotalcount{label}

which gives the sum of all the per-unit totals from the previous run for the entry given by ⟨label⟩, and


\glsentryprevmaxcount  \glsentryprevmaxcount{label}

which gives the maximum per-unit total from the previous run.

The above two commands are unavailable for the document-wide counting.

Example of per-unit counting, where the unit is the chapter:

\documentclass{report}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\GlsXtrEnableEntryUnitCounting{abbreviation}{2}{chapter}  
\makeglossaries  
\newabbreviation{html}{HTML}{hypertext markup language}  
\newabbreviation{css}{CSS}{cascading style sheet}  
\newglossaryentry{sample}{name={sample},description={sample}}  
\begin{document}  
\chapter{Sample}  
Used once: \gls{html}.  
Used three times: \gls{css} and \gls{css} and \gls{css}.  
Used once: \gls{sample}.  
\chapter{Another Sample}  
Used once: \gls{css}.  
Used twice: \gls{html} and \gls{html}.  
\printglossaries  
\end{document}

In this document, the css entry is used three times in the first chapter. This is more than the trigger value of 2, so \gls{css} is expanded on first use with the short form used on subsequent use, and the css entries in that chapter are added to the glossary. In the second chapter, the css entry is only used once, which trips the suppression trigger, so in that chapter, the long form is used and \gls{css} doesn’t get a line added to the glossary file.

The html is used a total of three times, but the expansion and indexing suppression trigger is tripped in both chapters because the per-unit total (1 for the first chapter and 2 for the second chapter) is less than or equal to the trigger value.

The sample entry has only been used once, but it doesn’t trip the indexing suppression because it’s in the general category, which hasn’t been listed in \GlsXtrEnableEntryUnitCounting.

The per-unit entry counting can be used for other purposes. In the following example document the trigger value is set to zero, which means the index suppression won’t be triggered, but the unit entry count is used to automatically suppress the hyperlink for commands like \gls by modifying the hook


\glslinkcheckfirsthyperhook  \glslinkcheckfirsthyperhook

which is used at the end of the macro the determines whether or not to suppress the hyperlink.

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[colorlinks]{hyperref}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\makeglossaries  
\GlsXtrEnableEntryUnitCounting{general}{0}{page}  
\newglossaryentry{sample}{name={sample},description={an example}}  
\renewcommand*{\glslinkcheckfirsthyperhook}{%  
  \ifnum\glsentrycurrcount\glslabel>0  
   \setkeys{glslink}{hyper=false}%  
  \fi  
}  
\begin{document}  
A \gls{sample} entry.  
Next use: \gls{sample}.  
\newpage  
Next page: \gls{sample}.  
Again: \gls{sample}.  
\printglossaries  
\end{document}

This only produces a hyperlink for the first instance of \gls{sample} on each page.

The earlier warning about using the page counter still applies. If the first instance of \gls occurs at the top of the page within a paragraph that started on the previous page, then the count will continue from the previous page.

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6.2 Link Counting

As from version 1.26, an alternative method of entry counting is to count the number of times the \gls-like or \glstext-like commands are used. (The “link” in this method’s name refers to the use of the internal command \@gls@link not to \hyperlink although \@gls@link may use \hyperlink when displaying the link-text.)

To enable link counting use the preamble-only command:


\GlsXtrEnableLinkCounting  \GlsXtrEnableLinkCounting[master counter] {categories}

where ⟨categories⟩ is a list of category labels. The optional argument ⟨master counter⟩ may be used to identify a master counter (which must be defined). If present, the associated link counter will be reset when the master counter is incremented. This command automatically sets the linkcount attribute for the given categories. If the optional argument is present, it also sets the linkcountmaster attribute.

When enabled, commands like \gls and \glstext increment the associated counter using


\glsxtrinclinkcounter  \glsxtrinclinkcounter{counter name}

This just does \stepcounter{counter name} by default but if you need \refstepcounter instead, just redefine this command:

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrinclinkcounter}[1]{\refstepcounter{#1}}

You can access the internal count register using


\GlsXtrLinkCounterValue  \GlsXtrLinkCounterValue{label}

where ⟨label⟩ is the entry’s label. This will expand to 0 if the counter hasn’t been defined.

It’s also possible to access the display value (\thecounter⟩) using


\GlsXtrTheLinkCounter  \GlsXtrTheLinkCounter{counter}

(This will expand to 0 if the counter hasn’t been defined.)

In order to conserve resources, the counter is only defined when it first needs to be incremented so terms that have been defined but haven’t been used in the document won’t have the associated count register allocated.

You can test if the counter has been defined using:


\GlsXtrIfLinkCounterDef  \GlsXtrIfLinkCounterDef{label}{true}{false}

where ⟨label⟩ is the entry’s label.

The counter name can be obtained using


\GlsXtrLinkCounterName  \GlsXtrLinkCounterName{label}

This simply expands to the counter name associated with the entry given by ⟨label⟩ without any check for existence. For example, to change the display command (\thecounter⟩) using etoolbox:

\csdef{the\GlsXtrLinkCounterName{duck}}{\Roman{\GlsXtrLinkCounterName{duck}}}

This is useful if you just want to change the display for specific entries but isn’t convenient if you want to change the display for all entries. Instead, it’s simpler to redefine \GlsXtrTheLinkCounter. For example:

\renewcommand*{\GlsXtrTheLinkCounter}[1]{%  
 \GlsXtrIfLinkCounterDef{#1}%  
 {\Roman{\GlsXtrLinkCounterName{#1}}}%  
 {0}%  
}

In both cases, the redefinition should be implemented after \GlsXtrEnableLinkCounting.

Here’s an example document that uses link counting to disable the hyperlink after the first reference. This redefines \glslinkpresetkeys (which is used by both \gls and \glstext) instead of \glslinkcheckfirsthyperhook (which is used by \gls but not by \glstext).

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[colorlinks]{hyperref}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\makeglossaries  
\renewcommand*{\glslinkpresetkeys}{%  
 \ifnum\GlsXtrLinkCounterValue{\glslabel}>1  
  \setkeys{glslink}{hyper=false}%  
 \fi  
}  
\GlsXtrEnableLinkCounting{general}  
\newglossaryentry{sample1}{name={sample1},description={an example}}  
\newglossaryentry{sample2}{name={sample2},description={another example}}  
\newabbreviation{ex}{ex}{example}  
\begin{document}  
\section{Sample Section}  
\Gls{sample1}, \gls{sample2} and \gls{ex}.  
\Glstext{sample1} and \gls{ex} again.  
\section{Another Sample Section}  
\Gls{sample1}, \gls{sample2} and \gls{ex}.  
\printglossaries  
\end{document}

The use of \glslinkpresetkeys means that the options can override this. For example

\gls[hyper=true]{sample1}

will override the hyper=false setting in \glslinkpresetkeys. If \glslinkpostsetkeys is used instead, the hyper=false setting will override the setting provided in the optional argument.

The abbreviation category doesn’t have the linkcount attribute set (since it’s not listed in the argument of \GlsXtrEnableLinkCounting). This means that \GlsXtrLinkCounterValue always expands to 0 for the abbreviation (ex), so the inequality test

\ifnum\GlsXtrLinkCounterValue{\glslabel}>1

will always be false. This means that the abbreviation won’t have hyper=false applied. If the test is changed to

\ifnum\GlsXtrLinkCounterValue{\glslabel}=1  
\else  
 \setkeys{glslink}{hyper=false}%  
\fi

Then the abbreviation will always have hyper=false applied.

To reset the counter every section use the optional argument to set the master counter:

\GlsXtrEnableLinkCounting[section]{general}

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7. Auto-Indexing

It’s possible that you may also want a normal index as well as the glossary, and you may want entries to automatically be added to the index (as in this document). There are two attributes that govern this: indexname and dualindex.

The \glsxtrpostnamehook macro, used at the end of \glossentryname and \Glossentryname, checks the indexname attribute for the category associated with that entry. Since \glossentryname is used in the default glossary styles, this makes a convenient way of automatically indexing each entry name at its location in the glossary without fiddling around with the value of the name key.

The internal macro used by the glossaries package to write the information to the external glossary file is modified to check for the dualindex attribute.

In both cases, the indexing is done through


\glsxtrdoautoindexname  \glsxtrdoautoindexname{label}{attribute-label}

This uses the standard \index command with the sort value taken from the entry’s sort key and the actual value set to \glsentryname{label}. As from v1.16, there are user-level commands available to change the sort and actual value used by the automated index.

The actual value is given by


\glsxtrautoindexentry  \glsxtrautoindexentry{label}

where ⟨label⟩ is the entry’s label. The default definition is:

\newcommand*{\glsxtrautoindexentry}[1]{\string\glsentryname{#1}}

Note the use of \string to prevent \glsentryname from being expanded as it’s written to the index file.

The sort value is assigned using:


\glsxtrautoindexassignsort  \glsxtrautoindexassignsort{cs}{label}

where ⟨label⟩ is the entry label and ⟨cs⟩ is the command which needs to be set to the sort value. The default definition is:

\newcommand*{\glsxtrautoindexassignsort}[2]{%  
  \glsletentryfield{#1}{#2}{sort}%  
}

After this macro is called, ⟨cs⟩ is then processed to escape any of makeindex’s special characters. Note that this escaping is only performed on the sort not on the actual value.

The command used to perform the actual indexing is:


\glsxtrautoindex  \glsxtrautoindex{text}

This just does \index{text} by default.

The entry’s parent field isn’t referenced in this automated indexing.

For example, to index the value of the first key, instead of the name key:

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrautoindexentry}[1]{\string\glsentryfirst{#1}}

and if the sort value also needs to be set to the long field, if present, otherwise the sort field:

\renewcommand*{\glsxtrautoindexassignsort}[2]{%  
  \ifglshaslong{#2}%  
  {\glsletentryfield{#1}{#2}{long}}%  
  {\glsletentryfield{#1}{#2}{sort}}%  
}

If the value of the attribute given by ⟨attribute-label⟩ is “true”, no encap will be added, otherwise the encap will be the attribute value. For example:

\glssetcategoryattribute{general}{indexname}{textbf}

will set the encap to textbf which will display the relevant page number in bold whereas

\glssetcategoryattribute{general}{dualindex}{true}

won’t apply any formatting to the page number in the index.

The location used in the index will always be the page number not the counter used in the glossary. (Unless some other loaded package has modified the definition of \index to use some thing else.)

By default the format key won’t be used with the dualindex attribute. You can allow the format key to override the attribute value by using the preamble-only command:


\GlsXtrEnableIndexFormatOverride  \GlsXtrEnableIndexFormatOverride

If you use this command and hyperref has been loaded, then the theindex environment will be modified to redefine \glshypernumber to allow formats that use that command.

The dualindex attribute will still be used on subsequent use even if the indexonlyfirst attribute (or indexonlyfirst package option) is set. However, the dualindex attribute will honour the noindex key.

The \glsxtrdoautoindexname command will attempt to escape any of \makeindex’s special characters, but there may be special cases where it fails, so take care. This assumes the default makeindex actual, level, quote and encap values (unless any of the commands \actualchar, \levelchar, \quotechar or \encapchar have been defined before glossaries-extra is loaded).

If this isn’t the case, you can use the following preamble-only commands to set the correct characters.

Be very careful of possible shifting category codes!


\GlsXtrSetActualChar  \GlsXtrSetActualChar{char}

Set the actual character to ⟨char⟩.


\GlsXtrSetLevelChar  \GlsXtrSetLevelChar{char}

Set the level character to ⟨char⟩.


\GlsXtrSetEscChar  \GlsXtrSetEscChar{char}

Set the escape (quote) character to ⟨char⟩.


\GlsXtrSetEncapChar  \GlsXtrSetEncapChar{char}

Set the encap character to ⟨char⟩.

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8. On-the-Fly Document Definitions

The commands described here may superficially look like ⟨word\index{word}, but they behave rather differently. If you want to use \index then just use \index.

The glossaries package advises against defining entries in the document environment. As mentioned in §1.2 New or Modified Package Options above, this ability is disabled by default with glossaries-extra but can be enabled using the docdefs package options.

Although this can be problematic, the glossaries-extra package provides a way of defining and using entries within the document environment without the tricks used with the docdefs option. There are limitations with this approach, so take care with it. This function is disabled by default, but can be enabled using the preamble-only command:


\GlsXtrEnableOnTheFly  \GlsXtrEnableOnTheFly

When used, this defines the commands described below.

The commands \glsxtr, \glsxtrpl, \Glsxtr and \Glsxtrpl can’t be used after the glossaries have been displayed (through \printglossary etc). It’s best not to mix these commands with the standard glossary commands, such as \gls or there may be unexpected results.


\glsxtr  \glsxtr[gls-options][dfn-options]{label}

If an entry with the label ⟨label⟩ has already been defined, this just does \gls [gls-options]{label}. If ⟨label⟩ hasn’t been defined, this will define the entry using:

\newglossaryentry{label}{name={label},
 category=\glsxtrcat,
 description={\nopostdesc},
 dfn-options}

The ⟨label⟩ must contain any non-expandable commands, such as formatting commands or problematic characters. If the term requires any of these, they must be omitted from the ⟨label⟩ and placed in the name key must be provided in the optional argument ⟨dfn-options⟩.

The second optional argument ⟨dfn-options⟩ should be empty if the entry has already been defined, since it’s too late for them. If it’s not empty, a warning will be generated with


\GlsXtrWarning  \GlsXtrWarning{dfn-options}{label}

For example, this warning will be generated on the second instance of \glsxtr below:

\glsxtr[][plural=geese]{goose}  
 ... later  
\glsxtr[][plural=geese]{goose}

If you are considering doing something like:

\newcommand*{\goose}{\glsxtr[][plural=geese]{goose}}  
\renewcommand*{\GlsXtrWarning}[2]{}  
 ... later  
\goose\ some more text here

then don’t bother. It’s simpler and less problematic to just define the entries in the preamble with \newglossaryentry and then use \gls in the document.

There are plural and case-changing alternatives to \glsxtr:


\glsxtrpl  \glsxtrpl[gls-options][dfn-options]{label}

This is like \glsxtr but uses \glspl instead of \gls.


\Glsxtr  \Glsxtr[gls-options][dfn-options]{label}

This is like \glsxtr but uses \Gls instead of \gls.


\Glsxtrpl  \Glsxtrpl[gls-options][dfn-options]{label}

This is like \glsxtr but uses \Glspl instead of \gls.

If you use UTF-8 and don’t want the inconvenient of needing to use an ASCII-only label, then it’s better to use XƎLATEX or LuaLATEX instead of LATEX (or pdfLATEX). If you really desperately want to use UTF-8 entry labels without switching to XƎLATEX or LuaLATEX then there is a starred version of \GlsXtrEnableOnTheFly that allows you to use UTF-8 characters in ⟨label⟩, but it’s experimental and may not work in some cases.

If you use the starred version of \GlsXtrEnableOnTheFly don’t use any commands in the ⟨label⟩, even if they expand to just text.

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9. bib2gls: Managing Reference Databases

There is a new command line application called bib2gls, which works in much the same way as a combination of bibtex and makeindex/xindy. Instead of storing all your entry definitions in a .tex and loading them using \input or \loadglsentries, the entries can instead be stored in a .bib file and bib2gls can selectively write the appropriate commands to a .glstex file which is loaded using \glsxtrresourcefile (or \GlsXtrLoadResources).

This means that you can use a reference managing system, such as JabRef, to maintain the database and it reduces the TEX overhead by only defining the entries that are actually required in the document. If you currently have a .tex file that contains hundreds of definitions, but you only use a dozen or so in your document, then the build time is needlessly slowed by the unrequired definitions that occur when the file is input. (You can convert an existing .tex file containing glossary definitions to a .bib file using convertgls2bib, supplied with bib2gls.)

There are some new commands and options added to glossaries-extra to help assist the integration of bib2gls into the document build process.

This chapter just provides a general overview of bib2gls. The full details and some sample documents are provided in the bib2gls manual.

An example of the contents of .bib file that stores glossary entries that can be extracted with bib2gls:

@entry{bird,  
  name={bird},  
  description = {feathered animal},  
  see={[see also]{duck,goose}}  
}  
@entry{duck,  
  name={duck},  
  description = {a waterbird with short legs}  
}  
@entry{goose,  
  name="goose",  
  plural="geese",  
  description={a waterbird with a long neck}  
}

The follow provides some abbreviations:

@string{ssi={server-side includes}}  
@string{html={hypertext markup language}}  
@abbreviation{shtml,  
  short="shtml",  
  long= ssi # " enabled " # html,  
  description={a combination of \gls{html} and \gls{ssi}}  
}  
@abbreviation{html,  
  short ="html",  
  long  = html,  
  description={a markup language for creating web pages}  
}  
@abbreviation{ssi,  
  short="ssi",  
  long = ssi,  
  description={a simple interpreted server-side scripting language}  
}

Here are some symbols:

preamble{"\providecommand{\mtx}[1]{\boldsymbol{#1}}"}  
@symbol{M,  
  name={$\mtx{M}$},  
  text={\mtx{M}},  
  description={a matrix}  
}  
@symbol{v,  
  name={$\vec{v}$},  
  text={\vec{v}},  
  description={a vector}  
}  
@symbol{S,  
  name={$\mathcal{S}$},  
  text={\mathcal{S}},  
  description={a set}  
}

To ensure that bib2gls can find out which entries have been used in the document, you need the record package option:

\usepackage[record]{glossaries-extra}

If this option’s value is omitted (as above), the normal indexing will be switched off, since bib2gls can also sort the entries and collate the locations.

If you still want to use an indexing application (for example, you need a custom xindy rule), then just use record=alsoindex and continue to use \makeglossaries and \printglossary (or \printglossaries), but you also need to instruct bib2gls to omit sorting to save time and to prevent the sort key from being set.

The .glstex file created by bib2gls is loaded using:


\glsxtrresourcefile  \glsxtrresourcefile[options]{filename}

(Don’t include the file extension in ⟨filename⟩.) There’s a shortcut version (recommended over the above) that sets ⟨filename⟩ to use \jobname:


\GlsXtrLoadResources  \GlsXtrLoadResources[options]

On the first use, this command is a shortcut for

\glsxtrresourcefile[options]{\jobname}
On subsequent use,9.1 this command is a shortcut for
\glsxtrresourcefile[options]{\jobname-n}
where ⟨n⟩ is the current value of


\glsxtrresourcecount

which is incremented at the end of \GlsXtrLoadResources. Any advisory notes regarding \glsxtrresourcefile also apply to \GlsXtrLoadResources.

The \glsxtrresourcefile command writes the line

\glsxtr@resource{options}{filename}
to the .aux file and will input ⟨filename.glstex if it exists.9.2

Since the .glstex file won’t exist on the first LATEX run, the record package option additionally switches on undefaction=warn. Any use of commands like \gls or \glstext will produce ?? in the document, since the entries are undefined at this point. Once bib2gls has created the .glstex file the references should be resolved. This may cause a shift in the locations if the actual text produced once the entry is defined is significantly larger than the placeholder ?? (as this can alter the page breaking).

Note that as from v1.12, \glsxtrresourcefile temporarily switches the category code of @ to 11 (letter) while it reads the file to allow for any internal commands stored in the location field.

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9.1 Selection

The default behaviour is for bib2gls to select all entries that have a record in the .aux file, and any dependent entries (including parent and cross-references). The glsignore format (for example, \gls[format=glsignore]{duck}) is recognised by bib2gls as a special ignored record. This means that it will match the selection criteria but the record won’t be added to the location list. This means that you won’t get spurious commas in the location list (as can happen with the other indexing methods), so you can do, for example,

\GlsXtrSetDefaultNumberFormat{glsignore}

at the start of the front matter and

\GlsXtrSetDefaultNumberFormat{glsnumberformat}

at the start of the main matter to prevent any records in the front matter from occurring in the location lists.

Note that commands like \glsaddall and \glsaddallunused don’t work with bib2gls as the command has to iterate over the internal lists of defined entry labels, which will be empty on the first run and on subsequent runs will only contain those entries that have been selected by bib2gls.

If you want to add all entries to the glossary, you need to tell bib2gls this in the options list. For example:

\GlsXtrLoadResources[src={terms},selection={all}]

This will add all entries, regardless of whether or not they have any records in the .aux file. Those that don’t have any records will have an empty location list. See the bib2gls user manual for more details of this option.

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9.2 Sorting and Displaying the Glossary

There are many sorting options provided by bib2gls. The default is to sort according to the system locale. If the document has a language setting, you can use sort=doc to instruct bib2gls to sort according to that. (The language tag obtained from tracklang’s interface is written to the .aux file.) For a multilingual document you need to explicitly set the locale using a well-formed language tag. For example:

\GlsXtrLoadResources[  
  src=terms, % data in terms.bib  
  sort=de-DE-1996 % sort according to this locale  
]

The locale-sensitive sort methods usually ignore most punctuation so for lists of symbols you may find it more appropriate to use one of the letter-base sort methods that sort according to the Unicode value of each character. Alternatively you can provide a custom rule. See the bib2gls manual for full details of all the available sort methods.

Since the .glstex file only defines those references required within the document (selected according to the selection option) and the definitions have been written in the order corresponding to bib2gls’s sorted list, the glossaries can simply be displayed using \printunsrtglossary (or \printunsrtglossaries), described in §10.2 Display All Entries Without Sorting or Indexing.

Suppose the .bib examples shown above have been stored in the files terms.bib, abbrvs.bib and symbols.bib which may either be in the current directory or on TEX’s path. Then the document might look like:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[record]{glossaries-extra}  
\setabbreviationstyle{long-short-desc}  
\GlsXtrLoadResources[src={terms,abbrvs,symbols}]  
\begin{document}  
\gls{bird}  
\gls{shtml}  
\gls{M}  
\printunsrtglossaries  
\end{document}

The document build process (assuming the document is called mydoc) is:

pdflatex mydoc  
bib2gls mydoc  
pdflatex mydoc

This creates a single glossary containing the entries: bird, duck, goose, html, M, shtml and ssi (in that order). The bird, shtml and M entries were added because bib2gls detected (from the .aux file) that they had been used in the document. The other entries were added because bib2gls detected (from the .bib files) that they are referenced by the used entries. In the case of duck and goose, they are in the see field for bird. In the case of ssi and html, they are referenced in the description field of shtml. These cross-referenced entries won’t have a location list when the glossary is first displayed, but depending on how they are referenced, they may pick up a location list on the next document build.

The entries can be separated into different glossaries with different sort methods:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[record,abbreviations,symbols]{glossaries-extra}  
\setabbreviationstyle{long-short-desc}  
\GlsXtrLoadResources[src={terms},sort={en-GB},type=main]  
\GlsXtrLoadResources  
 [src={abbrvs},sort={letter-nocase},type=abbreviations]  
\GlsXtrLoadResources  
 [src={symbols},sort={use},type={symbols}]  
\begin{document}  
\gls{bird}  
\gls{shtml}  
\gls{M}  
\printunsrtglossaries  
\end{document}

Or you can have multiple instance of \GlsXtrLoadResources with the same type, which will produce a glossary with ordered sub-blocks. For example:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[record,style=indexgroup]{glossaries-extra}  
\setabbreviationstyle{long-short-desc}  
\GlsXtrLoadResources  
 [src={abbrvs},sort={letter-nocase},type=main,  
  group={Abbreviations}]  
\GlsXtrLoadResources  
 [src={symbols},sort={use},type=main,  
  group={Symbols}]  
\GlsXtrLoadResources[src={terms},sort={en-GB},type=main]  
\begin{document}  
\gls{bird}  
\gls{shtml}  
\gls{M}  
\printunsrtglossaries  
\end{document}

This will result in a glossary where the first group has the title “Abbreviations”, the second group has the title “Symbols” and then follow the usual letter groups. Note that for this example to work, you must run bib2gls with the --group (or -g) switch. For example, if the document is called myDoc.tex:

pdflatex myDoc  
bib2gls -g myDoc  
pdflatex myDoc

The value of the group field must always be a label. You can set the corresponding title with \glsxtrsetgrouptitle (see §2.10 Glossary Style Modifications). If no title is set then the label is used as the group title.

You can provide your own custom sort rule. For example, if you are using XƎLATEX or LuaLATEX:

\GlsXtrLoadResources[
  src=terms, % entries in terms.bib
  sort=custom, % custom sort rule
  sort-rule={% required with sort=custom
  < æ;Æ < a;á;å;ä,Ä;Á;Å;Ä < b,B
  < c;ć,C;Ć < d,D < e;é,E;É < f,F < g,G
  < h,H < i;í,I;Í < j,J < l;ł,L;Ł < m,M < n,N
  < o;ö;ø,O;Ö < p,P < q,Q < r,R < s;ś,S;Ś
  < t,T < u;ú,U;Ú < v,V < w,W < x,X < y,Y <
  z;ż,Z;Ż
  }
]
Remember that if you are using inputenc then extended characters, such as é or ø, are active and will expand when written to the .aux file. So with PDFLATEX the above would have to be changed to protect against expansion. Some of the options, including sort-rule, allow Unicode characters to be indicated in the format \uhex⟩ (or \u ⟨hex⟩) in the .aux file. bib2gls will recognise this as the character given by the hexadecimal value ⟨hex⟩. The \u also needs protection from expansion, so with a non-Unicode aware engine, the character æ needs to be written as \string\uE6 and so on. This is quite cumbersome, but you can use the shortcut \glshex E6 instead, so the above needs to be written as:
\GlsXtrLoadResources[
  src=terms, % entries in terms.bib
  sort=custom, % custom sort rule
  sort-rule={% required with sort=custom
  < \glshex E6;\glshex C6
  < a;\glshex E1;\glshex E5,\glshex E4,A;\glshex C1;\glshex C5;\glshex C4
  < b,B < c;\glshex 0107,C;\glshex 0106 < d,D
  < e;\glshex E9,E;\glshex C9 < f,F < g,G
  < h,H < i;\glshex ED,I;\glshex CD < j,J
  < l;\glshex 0142,L;\glshex 0141 < m,M < n,N
  < o;\glshex F6;\glshex F8,O;\glshex D6;\glshex D8
  < p,P < q,Q < r,R < s;\glshex 013F,S;\glshex 015A
  < t,T < u;\glshex FA,U;\glshex DA < v,V < w,W < x,X < y,Y
  < z;\glshex 017C,Z;\glshex 017B
  }]

Top

9.3 The glossaries-extra-bib2gls package

The package option record=only (or simply record) automatically loads the supplementary package glossaries-extra-bib2gls, which provides some commands that are specific to bib2gls. The package isn’t loaded by record=alsoindex as that option is intended for sorting with makeindex or xindy and it is expected that the sorting will be switched off (with the resource option sort=none).

If glossaries-extra-bib2gls is loaded via the record package option then the check for associated language resource files (see §13 Multi-Lingual Support) will also search for the existence of glossariesxtr-script.ldf for each document dialect (where ⟨script⟩ is the four letter script identifier, such as Latn).


\glshex  \glshex

This is just defined as \string\u, which is required when you need to indicate a Unicode character in the form \uhex⟩ in some of the resource options (as illustrated above).


\glscapturedgroup  \glscapturedgroup

This is just defined as \string\$ and is used for the captured group reference in a replacement part of a regular expression substitution (requires at least bib2gls version 1.5). For example:

sort-replace={{([a-zA-Z])\string\.}{\glscapturedgroup1}}

This only removes a full stop that follows any of the characters a,…,z or A,…,Z.

If you use the save-child-count resource option, you can test if the childcount field is non-zero using:


\GlsXtrIfHasNonZeroChildCount  \GlsXtrIfHasNonZeroChildCount{label} {true}{false}

This internally uses \GlsXtrIfFieldNonZero and will do ⟨false⟩ if the field isn’t set. Within ⟨true⟩ and ⟨false⟩ you can use \glscurrentfieldvalue to access the value. (It will be 0 in ⟨false⟩ if the field isn’t set.)


\glsxtrprovidecommand  \glsxtrprovidecommand

This command is intended for use in @preamble. It’s simply defined to \providecommand in glossaries-extra-bib2gls but bib2gls’s interpreter treats it as \renewcommand. This means that you can override bib2gls’s internal definition of a command without overriding the command definition in the document (if it’s already defined before the resource file is input). For example

@preamble{"\glsxtrprovidecommand{\int}{integral}"}

This will force bib2gls to treat \int as the word “integral” to assist sorting but if this preamble code is written to the .glstex file (as it is by default) then it won’t override the current definition (provided by the kernel or redefined by a package).


\GlsXtrIndexCounterLink  \GlsXtrIndexCounterLink{text}{label}

If the \hyperref command has been defined (that is, hyperref has been loaded before glossaries-extra) then this command checks for the existence of the indexcounter field. If this field is set for the entry given by ⟨label⟩, this command does \hyperref[wrglossary.value]{text}, where ⟨value⟩ is the value of the indexcounter field. If the field isn’t set or if \hyperref hasn’t been defined, this just does ⟨text⟩. This command is provided for use with the indexcounter package option combined with bib2gls’s save-index-counter resource option. See the bib2gls manual for further details (at least version 1.4).


\GlsXtrBibTeXEntryAliases  \GlsXtrBibTeXEntryAliases

A convenient shortcut for use in the entry-type-aliases setting. This provides aliases for BibTEX’s standard entry types to bib2gls’s @bibtexentry entry type (requires at least bib2gls version 1.4).


\GlsXtrProvideBibTeXFields  \GlsXtrProvideBibTeXFields

Defines storage keys for BibTEX’s standard fields. Note that BibTEX’s type field clashes with the glossaries package’s type key, so this command provides the key bibtextype instead. You can alias it with field-aliases=type=bibtextype in the resource options. Each storage key is provided with a convenient command to access the value in the form \glsxtrbibfield⟩. For example, \glsxtrbibaddress. The bibtextype field can be accessed with \glsxtrbibtype. Each of these commands takes the entry label as the sole argument.

The glossaries-extra-bib2gls package also provides definitions of the missing mathematical Greek commands: \Alpha, \Beta, \Epsilon, \Zeta, \Eta, \Iota, \Kappa, \Mu, \Nu, \Omicron, \Rho, \Tau, \Chi, \Digamma, \omicron. These are all defined with \providecommand, so they won’t override any definitions provided by any package loaded before glossaries-extra. Since bib2gls’s interpreter recognises these commands, using them instead of explicitly using the Latin characters with the same shape helps to keep the Greek symbols together when sorting. Similarly, if upgreek has been loaded, the missing upright Greek commands are also provided.

The remaining commands provide common rule blocks for use in the sort-rule resource option. If you want a rule for a specific locale, you can provide similar commands in a file called glossariesxtr-tag.ldf, where ⟨tag⟩ identifies the dialect, locale, region or root language. See the description of \IfTrackedLanguageFileExists in the tracklang documentation for further details. If this file is on TEX’s path and the tracklang package (automatically loaded by glossaries) detects that the document has requested that language or locale, then the file will automatically be loaded. For example, if you want to provide a rule block for Welsh, then create a file called glossariesxtr-welsh.ldf that contains:

\ProvidesGlossariesExtraLang{welsh}[2018/02/23 v1.0]  
\@ifpackageloaded{glossaries-extra-bib2gls}  
{  
  \newcommand{\glsxtrWelshRules}{%  
   \glsxtrLatinA  
   \string<b,B  
   \string<c,C  
   \string<ch,CH  
   \string<d,D  
   \string<dd,DD  
   \string<\glsxtrLatinE  
   \string<f,F  
   \string<ff,FF  
   \string<g,G  
   \string<ng,NG  
   \string<\glsxtrLatinH  
   \string<\glsxtrLatinI  
   \string<j,J  
   \string<\glsxtrLatinL  
   \string<ll,LL  
   \string<\glsxtrLatinM  
   \string<\glsxtrLatinN  
   \string<\glsxtrLatinO  
   \string<\glsxtrLatinP  
   \string<ph,PH  
   \string<r,R  
   \string<rh,RH  
   \string<\glsxtrLatinS  
   \string<\glsxtrLatinT  
   \string<th,TH  
   \string<u,U  
   \string<w,W  
   \string<y,Y  
  }  
}  
{}% glossaries-extra-bib2gls.sty not loaded

(The use of \string is in case the < character has been made active.) You can provide more than one rule-block per local, to allow for loanwords or foreign words. For example, you could provide \glsxtrWelshIRules, \glsxtrWelshIIRules etc.

If the rules are for a particular script (independent of language or region) then they can be provided in a file given by glossariesxtr-script.ldf instead. For example, the file glossariesxtr-Cyrl.ldf could contain:

\ProvidesGlossariesExtraLang{Cyrl}[2018/02/23 v1.0]  
\newcommand*{\glsxtrGeneralCyrillicIRules}{%  
  % Cyrillic rules  
}  
\newcommand*{\glsxtrGeneralCyrillicIIRules}{%  
  % an alternative set of Cyrillic rules  
}

(Remember that the required document language scripts need to be tracked through the tracklang package, in order for these files to be automatically loaded. This essentially means ensuring you load the appropriate language package before tracklang is loaded by the base glossaries package or any other package that uses it. See the tracklang documentation for further details.)

Alternatively, if the rules are specific to a subject rather than a region or language, then you can provide a supplementary package. For example, if you have a package called, say, mapsymbols that provides map symbols, then the file mapsymbols.sty might contain:

\NeedsTeXFormat{LaTeX2e}  
\ProvidesPackage{mapsymbols}  
 some package or font loading stuff here to provide  
 the appropriate symbols  
\newcommand{\Stadium}{...}  
\newcommand{\Battlefield}{...}  
\newcommand{\Harbour}{...}  
 etc  
 Provide a rule block:  
\newcommand{\MapSymbolOrder}{%  
 \glshex 2694 % crossed-swords 0x2694  
 \string< \glshex 2693 % anchor 0x2693  
 \string< \glshex 26BD % football 0x26BD  
}

and the supplementary file mapsymbols.bib can provide the appropriate definitions for bib2gls:

@preamble{"\glsxtrprovidecommand{\Harbour}{\char"2693}  
\glsxtrprovidecommand{\Battlefield}{\char"2694}  
\glsxtrprovidecommand{\Stadium}{\char"26BD}"}

Now both the preamble and rule block can be used in the resource set:

\usepackage{mapsymbols}% my custom package  
\usepackage[record]{glossaries-extra}  
\GlsXtrLoadResources[  
  src={mapsymbols,% <--- my custom mapsymbols.bib  
   entries% data in entries.bib  
  },  
  sort={custom},  
  sort-rule={\glsxtrcontrolrules % control codes  
 ;\glsxtrspacerules % space characters  
 ;\glsxtrnonprintablerules % non-printable characters  
 ;\glsxtrcombiningdiacriticrules % combining diacritics  
 ,\glsxtrhyphenrules % hyphens  
 <\glsxtrgeneralpuncrules % general punctuation  
 <\glsxtrdigitrules % 0, ..., 9  
 <\glsxtrfractionrules % fraction symbols  
 <\MapSymbolOrder % <--- custom map symbols  
 <\glsxtrMathItalicGreekIrules % math-greek symbols  
 <\glsxtrGeneralLatinIrules % Latin letters  
 }  
]

The following commands are provided by glossaries-extra-bib2gls. They should be separated by the rule separator characters ; (semi-colon) or , (comma) or & (ampersand) or < (less than). See Java’s RuleBasedCollator documentation for details of the rule syntax.

For example, the following will place the mathematical Greek symbols (\alpha, \Alpha, \beta, \Beta etc) in a block before Latin characters:

sort-rule={\glsxtrcontrolrules  
 ;\glsxtrspacerules  
 ;\glsxtrnonprintablerules  
 ;\glsxtrcombiningdiacriticrules  
 ,\glsxtrhyphenrules  
 <\glsxtrgeneralpuncrules  
 <\glsxtrdigitrules  
 <\glsxtrfractionrules  
 <\glsxtrMathItalicGreekIrules  
 <\glsxtrGeneralLatinIVrules  
 <\glsxtrLatinAA  
 <\glsxtrLatinOslash  
}


\glsxtrcontrolrules  \glsxtrcontrolrules

These are control characters that are usually placed at the start of a rule in the ignored section. They typically won’t occur in any sort values, but if they do they should normally be ignored.


\glsxtrspacerules  \glsxtrspacerules

These are space characters. They typically come after the control characters with the two blocks separated by a ; (semi-colon).


\glsxtrnonprintablerules  \glsxtrnonprintablerules

These are non-printable characters (BOM, tabs, line feed and carriage return). They typically come after the spaces separated by a ; (semi-colon). These characters aren’t checked for by bib2gls when it determines whether or not to use the interpreter, so a TAB or newline character may end up in the sort value if it wasn’t interpreted.


\glsxtrcombiningdiacriticrules  \glsxtrcombiningdiacriticrules

These are combining diacritic marks which typically follow the space and non-printable blocks (separated by a semi-colon). This command is defined in terms of sub-block commands:

\newcommand*{\glsxtrcombiningdiacriticrules}{%  
 \glsxtrcombiningdiacriticIrules\string;  
 \glsxtrcombiningdiacriticIIrules\string;  
 \glsxtrcombiningdiacriticIIIrules\string;  
 \glsxtrcombiningdiacriticIVrules  
}

If you prefer, you can use the sub-blocks directly in your required ordered.


\glsxtrcombiningdiacriticIrules  \glsxtrcombiningdiacriticIrules

This contains the combining diacritics: acute, grave, breve, circumflex, caron, ring, vertical line above, diaeresis (umlaut), double acute, tilde, dot above, combining macron.


\glsxtrcombiningdiacriticIIrules  \glsxtrcombiningdiacriticIIrules

This contains the combining diacritics: short solidus overlay, cedilla, ogonek, dot below, low line, overline, hook above, double vertical line above, double grave accent, candrabindu, inverted breve, turned comma above, comma above, reversed comma above, comma above right, grave accent below, acute accent below.


\glsxtrcombiningdiacriticIIIrules  \glsxtrcombiningdiacriticIIIrules

This contains the combining diacritics: left tack below, right tack below, left angle above, horn, left half ring below, up tack below, down tack below, plus sign below, minus sign below, palatalized hook below, retroflex hook below, diaresis below, ring below, comma below, vertical line below, bridge below, inverted double arch below, caron below, circumflex accent below, breve below, inverted breve below, tilde below, macron below, double low line, tilde overlay, short stroke overlay, long stroke overlay, long solidus overlay, right half ring below, inverted bridge below, square below, seagull below, x above, vertical tilde, double overline, Greek perispomeni, Greek dialytika tonos, Greek ypogegrammeni, double tilde, double inverted breve, Cyrillic titlo, Cyrillic palatalization, Cyrillic dasia pneumata, Cyrillic psili pneumata.


\glsxtrcombiningdiacriticIVrules  \glsxtrcombiningdiacriticIVrules

This contains the combining diacritics: left harpoon above, right harpoon above, long vertical line overlay, short vertical line overlay, anticlockwise arrow above, clockwise arrow above, left arrow above, right arrow above, ring overlay, clockwise ring overlay, anticlockwise ring overlay, three dots above, four dots above, enclosing circle, enclosing square, enclosing diamond, enclosing circle backslash, left right arrow above.


\glsxtrhyphenrules  \glsxtrhyphenrules

This contains hyphens (including the minus sign 0x2212). This rule block typically comes after the diacritic rules separated by a comma.


\glsxtrgeneralpuncrules  \glsxtrgeneralpuncrules

This contains punctuation characters. This rule block typically comes after the hyphen rules separated by a less than (<). As with the combining diacritics, this command is defined in terms of sub-blocks which may be used directly instead if a different order is required:

\newcommand*{\glsxtrgeneralpuncrules}{%  
  \glsxtrgeneralpuncIrules  
  \string<\glsxtrcurrencyrules  
  \string<\glsxtrgeneralpuncIIrules  
}


\glsxtrgeneralpuncIrules  \glsxtrgeneralpuncIrules

This is the first punctuation sub-block containing: underscore, macron, comma, semi-colon, colon, exclamation mark, inverted exclamation mark, question mark, inverted question mark, solidus, full stop, acute accent, grave accent, circumflex accent, diaersis, tilde, middle dot, cedilla, straight apostrophe, straight double quote, left guillemet, right guillemet, left parenthesis, right parenthesis, left square bracket, right square bracket, left curly bracket, right curly bracket, section sign, pilcrow sign, copyright sign, registered sign, at sign.


\glsxtrcurrencyrules  \glsxtrcurrencyrules

This sub-block contains some currency symbols: currency sign, Thai currency symbol baht, cent sign, colon sign, cruzeiro sign, dollar sign, dong sign, euro sign, French franc sign, lira sign, mill sign, naira sign, peseta sign, pound sign, rupee sign, new sheqel sign, won sign, yen sign.


\glsxtrgeneralpuncIIrules  \glsxtrgeneralpuncIIrules

This sub-block contains some other punctuation symbols: asterisk, backslash, ampersand, hash sign, percent sign, plus sign, plus-minus sign, division sign, multiplication sign, less-than sign, equals sign, greater-than sign, not sign, vertical bar (pipe), broken bar, degree sign, micron sign.


\glsxtrdigitrules  \glsxtrdigitrules

This rule block contains the Basic Latin digits (0, …, 9) and the subscript and superscript digits (0 0 etc) made equivalent to the corresponding Basic Latin digit. The digit block typically comes after the punctuation rules separated by a less than (<).


\glsxtrBasicDigitrules  \glsxtrBasicDigitrules

This rule block contains just the Basic Latin digits (0, …, 9).


\glsxtrSubScriptDigitrules  \glsxtrSubScriptDigitrules

This rule block contains just the subscript digits (0 … 9).


\glsxtrSuperScriptDigitrules  \glsxtrSuperScriptDigitrules

This rule block contains just the superscript digits (0 … 9).


\glsxtrfractionrules  \glsxtrfractionrules

This rule block contains vulgar fraction characters. The digit block typically comes after the digit rules separated by a less than (<).

There are a number of Latin rule blocks. Some of these included extended characters or ligatures (such as ß or œ) but they don’t include accented characters. If you require a Latin rule block that includes accented characters, digraphs, trigraphs or other extended characters, then it’s best to provide similar commands in a glossariesxtr-tag.ldf file for the particular language or region.


\glsxtrGeneralLatinIrules  \glsxtrGeneralLatinIrules

This is just the basic (non-extended) Latin alphabet with the superscript and subscript Latin letters (a a etc) treated as the equivalent basic Latin letter. (If you don’t want the subscripts and superscripts included you can redefine \glsxtrLatinA etc to omit them.)


\glsxtrGeneralLatinIIrules  \glsxtrGeneralLatinIIrules

This is like \glsxtrGeneralLatinIrules but it includes eth (Ð) between ‘D’ and ‘E’ and eszett (ß) treated as ‘ss’.


\glsxtrGeneralLatinIIIrules  \glsxtrGeneralLatinIIIrules

This is like \glsxtrGeneralLatinIrules but it includes eth (Ð) between ‘D’ and ‘E’ and eszett (ß) treated as ‘sz’.


\glsxtrGeneralLatinIVrules  \glsxtrGeneralLatinIVrules

This is like \glsxtrGeneralLatinIrules but it includes eth (Ð) between ‘D’ and ‘E’, ae-ligature (æ) is treated as ‘ae’, oe-ligature (œ) is treated as ‘oe’, eszett (ß) treated as ‘ss’ and thorn (þ) is treated as ‘th’.


\glsxtrGeneralLatinVrules  \glsxtrGeneralLatinVrules

This is like \glsxtrGeneralLatinIrules but it includes eth (Ð) between ‘D’ and ‘E’, eszett (ß) treated as ‘ss’ and thorn (þ) treated as ‘th’.


\glsxtrGeneralLatinVIrules  \glsxtrGeneralLatinVIrules

This is like \glsxtrGeneralLatinIrules but it includes eth (Ð) between ‘D’ and ‘E’, eszett (ß) treated as ‘sz’ and thorn (þ) treated as ‘th’.


\glsxtrGeneralLatinVIIrules  \glsxtrGeneralLatinVIIrules

This is like \glsxtrGeneralLatinIrules but it includes ae-ligature (æ) between ‘A’ and ‘B’, eth (Ð) between ‘D’ and ‘E’, insular G (Ᵹ) instead of ‘G’, oe-ligature between ‘O’ and ‘P’, long s (ſ) equivalent to ‘s’, thorn (þ) between ‘T’ and ‘U’ and wynn (Ƿ) instead of W.


\glsxtrGeneralLatinVIIIrules  \glsxtrGeneralLatinVIIIrules

This is like \glsxtrGeneralLatinIrules but ae-ligature (æ) is treated as ‘ae’, oe-ligature (œ) is treated as ‘oe’, eszett (ß) treated as ‘ss’, thorn (þ) is treated as ‘th’, Ø is treated as ‘O’ and ‘Ł’ is treated as ‘L’.


\glsxtrLatinA  \glsxtrLatinA

A mini-rule that just covers ‘A’ but includes the sub- and superscript A.


\glsxtrLatinE  \glsxtrLatinE

A mini-rule that just covers ‘E’ but includes the subscript E.


\glsxtrLatinH  \glsxtrLatinH

A mini-rule that just covers ‘H’ but includes the subscript H.


\glsxtrLatinK  \glsxtrLatinK

A mini-rule that just covers ‘K’ but includes the subscript K.


\glsxtrLatinI  \glsxtrLatinI

A mini-rule that just covers ‘I’ but includes the superscript I.


\glsxtrLatinL  \glsxtrLatinL

A mini-rule that just covers ‘L’ but includes the subscript L.


\glsxtrLatinM  \glsxtrLatinM

A mini-rule that just covers ‘M’ but includes the subscript M.


\glsxtrLatinN  \glsxtrLatinN

A mini-rule that just covers ‘N’ but includes the sub- and superscript N.


\glsxtrLatinO  \glsxtrLatinO

A mini-rule that just covers ‘O’ but includes the sub- and superscript O.


\glsxtrLatinP  \glsxtrLatinP

A mini-rule that just covers ‘P’ but includes the subscript P.


\glsxtrLatinS  \glsxtrLatinS

A mini-rule that just covers ‘S’ but includes the subscript S.


\glsxtrLatinT  \glsxtrLatinT

A mini-rule that just covers ‘T’ but includes the subscript T.


\glsxtrLatinX  \glsxtrLatinX

A mini-rule that just covers ‘X’ but includes the subscript X.


\glsxtrLatinEszettSs  \glsxtrLatinEszettSs

A mini-rule that just covers eszett (ß) and makes long s (ſ) followed by short ‘s’ equivalent to ‘ß’. (This is used in the above blocks that treat ‘ß’ as ‘ss’.)


\glsxtrLatinEszettSz  \glsxtrLatinEszettSz

A mini-rule that just covers eszett (ß) and makes long s (ſ) followed by ‘z’ equivalent to ‘ß’. (This is used in the above blocks that treat ‘ß’ as ‘sz’.)


\glsxtrLatinEth  \glsxtrLatinEth

A mini-rule for eth (Ð) so you don’t need to remember the Unicode values.


\glsxtrLatinThorn  \glsxtrLatinThorn

A mini-rule for thorn (þ) so you don’t need to remember the Unicode values.


\glsxtrLatinAELigature  \glsxtrLatinAELigature

A mini-rule for ae-ligature (æ) so you don’t need to remember the Unicode values.


\glsxtrLatinOELigature  \glsxtrLatinOELigature

A mini-rule for oe-ligature (œ) so you don’t need to remember the Unicode values.


\glsxtrLatinOslash  \glsxtrLatinOslash

A mini-rule for ‘Ø’ so you don’t need to remember the Unicode values.


\glsxtrLatinLslash  \glsxtrLatinLslash

A mini-rule for ‘Ł’ so you don’t need to remember the Unicode values.


\glsxtrLatinWynn  \glsxtrLatinWynn

A mini-rule for wynn (Ƿ) so you don’t need to remember the Unicode values.


\glsxtrLatinInsularG  \glsxtrLatinInsularG

A mini-rule for insular G (Ᵹ) so you don’t need to remember the Unicode values.


\glsxtrLatinSchwa  \glsxtrLatinSchwa

A mini-rule that just covers schwa (Ə) but includes the subscript schwa. (Not used in any of the provided Latin rule blocks described above.)


\glsxtrLatinAA  \glsxtrLatinAA

A mini-rule for ‘Å’ so you don’t need to remember the Unicode values. (Not used in any of the provided Latin rule blocks described above.)


\glsxtrMathGreekIrules  \glsxtrMathGreekIrules

A rule block for mathematical Greek (\alpha, \beta etc) and upright Greek (\upalpha, etc, from the upgreek package) characters that includes digamma (\digamma and \Digamma) between epsilon and zeta. The upright and italic versions are gathered together into the same letter group.


\glsxtrMathGreekIIrules  \glsxtrMathGreekIIrules

As \glsxtrMathGreekIrules but doesn’t include digamma.


\glsxtrMathUpGreekIrules  \glsxtrMathUpGreekIrules

A rule block for upright Greek (\upalpha, etc, from the upgreek package) characters that includes digamma (\digamma and \Digamma) between epsilon and zeta.


\glsxtrMathUpGreekIIrules  \glsxtrMathUpGreekIIrules

A rule block for upright Greek (\upalpha, etc, from the upgreek package) that doesn’t include digamma.


\glsxtrMathItalicGreekIrules  \glsxtrMathItalicGreekIrules

A rule block for mathematical Greek (\alpha, \Alpha, etc) characters that includes digamma (\diagamma and \Digamma) between epsilon and zeta. Note that even though the upper case \Delta etc are actually rendered upright by LATEX, bib2gls’s interpreter treats them as italic to help keep them close to the lower case versions.


\glsxtrMathItalicGreekIIrules  \glsxtrMathItalicGreekIIrules

A rule block for mathematical Greek (\alpha, \Alpha, etc) characters that doesn’t include digamma.


\glsxtrMathItalicUpperGreekIrules  \glsxtrMathItalicUpperGreekIrules

A rule block for upper case mathematical Greek (\Alpha, \Beta, etc) characters that includes digamma (\Digamma) between epsilon and zeta.


\glsxtrMathItalicUpperGreekIIrules  \glsxtrMathItalicUpperGreekIIrules

A rule block for upper case mathematical Greek (\Alpha, \Beta, etc) characters that doesn’t include digamma.


\glsxtrMathItalicLowerGreekIrules  \glsxtrMathItalicLowerGreekIrules

A rule block for lower case mathematical Greek (\alpha, \beta, etc) characters that includes digamma (\digamma) between epsilon and zeta.


\glsxtrMathItalicLowerGreekIIrules  \glsxtrMathItalicLowerGreekIIrules

A rule block for lower case mathematical Greek (\alpha, \beta, etc) characters that doesn’t include digamma.

Additionally, there are commands in the form \glsxtrUpAlpha, \glsxtrUpBeta etc and \glsxtrMathItalicAlpha, \glsxtrMathItalicBeta etc that just cover the upper and lower case forms of a special Greek character (\Upalpha, \upalpha etc and \Alpha, \alpha etc) as well as the following:


\glsxtrMathItalicPartial  \glsxtrMathItalicPartial

The partial derivative symbol ().


\glsxtrMathItalicNabla  \glsxtrMathItalicNabla

The nabla symbol ().

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9.4 Supplementary Commands

These commands are provided by glossaries-extra for use with bib2gls.

The information provided with \GlsXtrLoadResources is written to the .aux file using

\protected@write\@auxout{\glsxtrresourceinit}{information}
where ⟨information⟩ is the information to pass to bib2gls. The command in the second argument


\glsxtrresourceinit  \glsxtrresourceinit

may be used to temporarily redefine commands before the information is written to the file. This does nothing by default, but may be redefined to allow the use of short commands for convenience. For example, with:

\renewcommand{\glsxtrresourceinit}{\let\u\glshex}

you can just use, for example, \u E6 instead of \string\uE6 in the custom rule. This redefinition of \u is scoped so its original definition is restored after the write operation.

It’s possible to specify label prefixes. For example, modifying the earlier example:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[record,style=indexgroup]{glossaries-extra}  
\setabbreviationstyle{long-short-desc}  
\GlsXtrLoadResources  
 [src={abbrvs},sort={letter-nocase},type=main,  
  label-prefix={abr.},  
  group={Abbreviations}]  
\GlsXtrLoadResources  
 [src={symbols},sort={use},type=main,  
  label-prefix={sym.},  
  group={Symbols}]  
\GlsXtrLoadResources[src={terms},sort={en-GB},type=main  
  label-prefix={trm.}]  
\begin{document}  
\gls{trm.bird}  
\gls{abr.shtml}  
\gls{sym.M}  
\printunsrtglossaries  
\end{document}

If you do something like this, you may find it more convenient to define custom commands that set the prefix. For example:

\newcommand*{\sym}[2][]{\gls[#1]{sym.#2}}

The problem with this is that the custom command \sym doesn’t allow for modifiers (such as \gls* or \gls+). Instead you can use:


\glsxtrnewgls  \glsxtrnewgls[default options]{prefix}{cs}

which defines the command ⟨cs⟩ that behaves like

\glsmodifier[default options,options]{prefix⟩⟨label}[insert]
For example:
\glsxtrnewgls{sym.}{\sym}

or (to default to no hyperlinks)

\glsxtrnewgls[hyper=false]{sym.}{\sym}

now you can use \sym+{M} to behave like \gls+{sym.M}.

If you also want the plural and first letter upper case versions you can use


\glsxtrnewglslike  \glsxtrnewglslike[default options]{prefix} {\gls-like cs}{\glspl-like cs}{\Gls-like cs}{\Glspl-like cs}

For example:

\glsxtrnewglslike[hyper=false]{idx.}{\idx}{\idxpl}{\Idx}{\Idxpl}

For the all caps versions:


\glsxtrnewGLSlike  \glsxtrnewGLSlike[default options]{prefix} {\GLS-like cs}{\GLSpl-like cs}

For example:

\glsxtrnewGLSlike[hyper=false]{idx.}{\IDX}{\IDXpl}

There’s an analogous command for \rgls:


\glsxtrnewrgls  \glsxtrnewrgls[default options]{prefix}{cs}

and for \rgls, \rglspl, \rGls and \rGlspl:


\glsxtrnewrglslike  \glsxtrnewrglslike[default options]{prefix} {\rgls-like cs}{\rglspl-like cs}{\rGls-like cs}{\rGlspl-like cs}

and for the all caps:


\glsxtrnewrGLSlike  \glsxtrnewrGLSlike[default options]{prefix} {\rGLS-like cs}{\rGLSpl-like cs}

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9.5 Record Counting

As from version 1.1 of bib2gls, you can save the total record count for each entry by invoking bib2gls with the --record-count or --record-count-unit switches. These options will ensure that when each entry is written to the .glstex file bib2gls will additionally set the following internal fields for that entry:

If --record-count-unit is used then additionally:

Only use the unit counting option if the locations don’t contain any special characters. If you really need it with locations that may contain formatting commands, then you can try redefining:


\glsxtrdetoklocation  \glsxtrdetoklocation{location}

so that it detokenizes ⟨location⟩ but take care when using \GlsXtrLocationRecordCount with commands like \thepage as they can end up becoming detokenized too early.

Note that the record count includes locations that bib2gls discards, such as ignored records, duplicates and partial duplicates. It doesn’t include cross-reference records. For example, if \gls{bird} is used twice on page 1, once on page 2 and fours times on page 3, and \gls[counter=section]{bird} is used once in section 3, then the total record count (stored in the recordcount field) is 2 + 1 + 4 + 1 = 8, the total for the page counter (stored in the recordcount.page field) is 2 + 1 + 4 = 7, and the total for the section counter (stored in the recordcount.section field) is 1.

With the unit counting on as well, the field recordcount.page.1 is set to 2, recordcount.page.2 is set to 1, recordcount.page.3 is set to 4 and recordcount.section.3 is set to 1.

You can access these fields using the following commands which will expand to the field value if set or to 0 if unset:


\GlsXtrTotalRecordCount  \GlsXtrTotalRecordCount{label}

This expands to the total record count for the entry given by ⟨label⟩.

\GlsXtrTotalRecordCount{bird}

expands to 8.


\GlsXtrRecordCount  \GlsXtrRecordCount{label}{counter}

This expands to the counter total for the entry given by ⟨label⟩ where ⟨counter⟩ is the counter name. For example:

\GlsXtrRecordCount{bird}{page}

expands to 7 and

\GlsXtrRecordCount{bird}{section}

expands to 1.


\GlsXtrLocationRecordCount  \GlsXtrLocationRecordCount{label}{counter} {location}

This expands to the total for the given location. For example

\GlsXtrLocationRecordCount{bird}{page}{3}

expands to 4. Be careful about using \thepage in the ⟨location⟩ part. Remember that due to TEX’s asynchronous output routine, \thepage may not be correct.

There are commands analogous to the entry counting commands like \cgls and \cglsformat that are triggered by the record count. These are listed below.


\rgls  \rglsmodifier[options]{label}[insert]


\rglspl  \rglsplmodifier[options]{label}[insert]


\rGls  \rGlsmodifier[options]{label}[insert]


\rGlspl  \rGlsplmodifier[options]{label}[insert]


\rGLS  \rGLSmodifier[options]{label}[insert]


\rGLSpl  \rGLSplmodifier[options]{label}[insert]

These commands check the recordcount attribute which, if set, should be a number. For example:

\glssetcategoryattribute{abbreviation}{recordcount}{1}

For convenience, you can use


\GlsXtrSetRecordCountAttribute  \GlsXtrSetRecordCountAttribute{category list}{n}

to set the recordcount attribute to ⟨n⟩ for all the categories listed in ⟨category list⟩.

The \rgls-like commands use


\glsxtrifrecordtrigger  \glsxtrifrecordtrigger{label}{trigger code} {normal}

to determine whether the \rgls-like command should behave like its \gls counterpart (⟨normal⟩) or whether it should instead use ⟨trigger code⟩.

This command checks if the recordcount attribute is set. If not is just does ⟨normal⟩, otherwise it tests if


\glsxtrrecordtriggervalue  \glsxtrrecordtriggervalue{label}

is greater than the value given in the recordcount attribute for that entry’s category. If true, this does ⟨normal⟩ otherwise it does ⟨trigger code⟩. The default definition of the trigger value command is:

\newcommand*{\glsxtrrecordtriggervalue}[1]{%  
 \GlsXtrTotalRecordCount{#1}%  
}

The ⟨trigger code⟩ part writes a record with the format set to glstriggerrecordformat (which bib2gls v1.1+ recognises as a special type of ignored location format) and does ⟨trigger format⟩. Then it unsets the first use flag. Note that it doesn’t implement the post-link hook. This ensures that the record count is correct on the next run.

The ⟨trigger format⟩ depends on the \rgls-like command used and will be one of the following:


\rglsformat  \rglsformat{label}{insert}


\rglsplformat  \rglsplformat{label}{insert}


\rGlsformat  \rGlsformat{label}{insert}


\rGlsplformat  \rGlsplformat{label}{insert}


\rGLSformat  \rGLSformat{label}{insert}


\rGLSplformat  \rGLSplformat{label}{insert}

These all behave much like their \cglsformat counterparts. If the entry’s regular attribute is set or if the entry doesn’t have a long form, the first or first plural is used, otherwise the long or long plural form is used.

You can use


\glsxtrenablerecordcount  \glsxtrenablerecordcount

to redefine \gls, \glspl, \Gls, \Glspl, \GLS, \GLSpl to \rgls, \rglspl, \rGls, \rGlspl, \rGLS, \rGLSpl, respectively, for convenience.

If you don’t want the entries that use ⟨trigger code⟩ to appear in the glossary, you need to use the resource option trigger-type to assign them to another glossary. For example:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[record]{glossaries-extra}  
\newignoredglossary{ignored}  
\GlsXtrLoadResources[  
 src=example-glossaries-acronym,  
 trigger-type=ignored,  
 category=abbreviation  
]  
\glsxtrenablerecordcount  
\GlsXtrSetRecordCountAttribute{abbreviation}{1}  
\begin{document}  
\gls{lid}.  \gls{stc}. \gls{lid}.  \gls{aeu}.  
\gls{upa}. \gls{aeu}.  
\printunsrtglossaries  
\end{document}

In the above, stc and upa both only have one record, so they are assigned to the ignored glossary instead of the main one.

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10. Miscellaneous New Commands

The glossaries package provides \glsrefentry entry to cross-reference entries when used with the entrycounter or subentrycounter options. The glossaries-extra package provides a supplementary command


\glsxtrpageref  \glsxtrpageref{label}

that works in the same way except that it uses \pageref instead of \ref.

You can copy an entry to another glossary using


\glsxtrcopytoglossary  \glsxtrcopytoglossary{entry-label}{glossary-type}

This appends ⟨entry-label⟩ to the end of the internal list for the glossary given by ⟨glossary-type⟩. Be careful if you use the hyperref package as this may cause duplicate hypertargets. You will need to change \glolinkprefix to another value or disable hyperlinks when you display the duplicate. Alternatively, use the new target key to switch off the targets:

\printunsrtglossary[target=false]

The glossaries package allows you to set preamble code for a given glossary type using \setglossarypreamble. This overrides any previous setting. With glossaries-extra (as from v1.12) you can instead append to the preamble using


\apptoglossarypreamble  \apptoglossarypreamble[type]{code}

or prepend using


\pretoglossarypreamble  \pretoglossarypreamble[type]{code}

Top

10.1 Entry Fields

A field may now be used to store the name of a text-block command that takes a single argument. The field is given by


\GlsXtrFmtField  \GlsXtrFmtField

The default value is useri. Note that the value must be the control sequence name without the initial backslash.

For example:

\newcommand*{\mtx}[1]{\boldsymbol{#1}}  
\newcommand*{\mtxinv}[1]{\mtx{#1}\sp{-1}}  
\newglossaryentry{matrix}{%  
  name={matrix},  
  symbol={\ensuremath{\mtx{M}}},  
  plural={matrices},  
  user1={mtx},  
  description={rectangular array of values}  
}  
\newglossaryentry{identitymatrix}{%  
  name={identity matrix},  
  symbol={\ensuremath{\mtx{I}}},  
  plural={identity matrices},  
  description={a diagonal matrix with all diagonal elements equal to  
1 and all other elements equal to 0}  
}  
\newglossaryentry{matrixinv}{%  
  name={matrix inverse},  
  symbol={\ensuremath{\mtxinv{M}}},  
  user1={mtxinv},  
  description={a square \gls{matrix} such that  
   $\mtx{M}\mtxinv{M}=\glssymbol{identitymatrix}$}  
}

There are two commands provided that allow you to apply the command to an argument:


\glsxtrfmt  \glsxtrfmt[options]{label}{text}

This effectively does

\glslink[default-options,options]{label}{\glsxtrfmtdisplay {cs name}{text}{}}
where ⟨cs name⟩ is the control sequence name supplied in the provided field, which must be defined to take a single required argument. Although it effectively acts like \glslink it misses out the post-link hook.

The default ⟨default-options⟩ are given by


\GlsXtrFmtDefaultOptions  \GlsXtrFmtDefaultOptions

This is defined as noindex but may be redefined as appropriate. Note that the replacement text of \GlsXtrFmtDefaultOptions is prepended to the optional argument of \glslink.

As from version 1.23, there’s also a starred version of this command that has a final optional argument:


\glsxtrfmt*  \glsxtrfmt*[options]{label}{text}[insert]

Both the starred and unstarred versions use:


\glsxtrfmtdisplay  \glsxtrfmtdisplay{cs name}{text}{insert}

within the link text. In the case of the unstarred version ⟨insert⟩ will be empty. It will also be empty if the final option argument is missing from the starred form. If the entry given by ⟨label⟩ is undefined \glsxtrfmt and \glsxtrfmt* will issue an error (or warning if undefaction=warn). There won’t be a warning or error if the entry is defined by the given field is missing. In either case, (the entry is undefined or the field is missing) ⟨cs name⟩ will be @firstofone otherwise it will be the field value. The default definition is:

\newcommand{\glsxtrfmtdisplay}[3]{\csuse{#1}{#2}#3}

which puts ⟨text⟩ inside the argument of the control sequence and ⟨insert⟩ outside it (but it will still be inside the link text).

Remember that nested links cause a problem so avoid using commands like \gls or \glsxtrfmt within ⟨text⟩.

For example:

\[  
  \glsxtrfmt{matrix}{A}  
  \glsxtrfmt{matrixinv}{A}  
  =  
  \glssymbol{identitymatrix}  
\]

If the default options are set to noindex then \glsxtrfmt won’t index, but will create a hyperlink (if hyperref has been loaded). This can be changed so that it also suppresses the hyperlink:

\renewcommand{\GlsXtrFmtDefaultOptions}{hyper=false,noindex}

Note that \glsxtrfmt won’t work with PDF bookmarks. Instead you can use


\glsxtrentryfmt  \glsxtrentryfmt{label}{text}

This uses \texorpdfstring and will simply expand to ⟨text⟩ within the PDF bookmarks, but in the document it will do ⟨cs{text} if a control sequence name has been provided or just ⟨text⟩ otherwise.

The glossaries package provides \glsaddstoragekey to add new keys. This command will cause an error if the key has already been defined. The glossaries-extra package provides a supplementary command that will only define the key if it doesn’t already exist:


\glsxtrprovidestoragekey  \glsxtrprovidestoragekey{key}{default}{cs}

If the key has already been defined, it will still provide the command given in the third argument ⟨cs⟩ (if it hasn’t already been defined). Unlike \glsaddstoragekey, ⟨cs⟩ may be left empty if you’re happy to just use \glsfieldfetch to fetch the value of this new key.

You can test if a key has been provided with:


\glsxtrifkeydefined  \glsxtrifkeydefined{key}{true}{false}

This tests if ⟨key⟩ is available for use in the ⟨key⟩= list in the second argument of \newglossaryentry (or the optional argument of commands like \newabbreviation). The corresponding field may not have been set for any of the entries if no default was provided.

There are now commands provided to set individual fields. Note that these only change the specified field, not any related values. For example, changing the value of the text field won’t update the plural field. There are also some fields that should really only be set when entries are defined (such as the parent field). Unexpected results may occur if they are subsequently changed.


\GlsXtrSetField  \GlsXtrSetField{label}{field}{value}

Sets the field given by ⟨field⟩ to ⟨value⟩ for the entry given by ⟨label⟩. No expansion is performed. It’s not necessary for the field to have been defined as a key. You can access the value later with \glsxtrusefield. Note that \glsxtrifkeydefined only tests if a key has been defined for use with commands like \newglossaryentry. If a field without a corresponding key is assigned a value, the key remains undefined. This command is robust.

\GlsXtrSetField uses


\glsxtrsetfieldifexists  \glsxtrsetfieldifexists{label}{field}{code}

where ⟨label⟩ is the entry label and ⟨code⟩ is the assignment code.

This command just uses \glsdoifexists{label}{code} (ignoring the ⟨field⟩ argument), so by default it causes an error if the entry doesn’t exist. This can be changed to a warning with undefaction=warn. You can redefine \glsxtrsetfieldifexists to simply do ⟨code⟩ if you want to skip the existence check. Alternatively you can instead use


\glsxtrdeffield  \glsxtrdeffield{label}{field}arguments{replacement text}

This simply uses etoolbox’s \csdef without any checks. This command isn’t robust. There is also a version that uses \protected@csedef instead:10.1


\glsxtredeffield  \glsxtredeffield{label}{field}arguments{replacement text}


\gGlsXtrSetField  \gGlsXtrSetField{label}{field}{value}

As \GlsXtrSetField but globally.


\eGlsXtrSetField  \eGlsXtrSetField{label}{field}{value}

As \GlsXtrSetField but uses protected expansion.


\xGlsXtrSetField  \xGlsXtrSetField{label}{field}{value}

As \gGlsXtrSetField but uses protected expansion.


\GlsXtrLetField  \GlsXtrLetField{label}{field}{cs}

Sets the field given by ⟨field⟩ to the replacement text of ⟨cs⟩ for the entry given by ⟨label⟩ (using \let).


\csGlsXtrLetField  \csGlsXtrLetField{label}{field}{cs name}

As \GlsXtrLetField but the control sequence name is supplied instead.


\GlsXtrLetFieldToField  \GlsXtrLetFieldToField{label-1}{field-1} {label-2}{field-2}

Sets the field given by ⟨field-1⟩ for the entry given by ⟨label-1⟩ to the field given by ⟨field-2⟩ for the entry given by ⟨label-2⟩. There’s no check for the existence of ⟨label-2⟩, but \glsxtrsetfieldifexists{label-1}{field-1}{code} is still used, as for \GlsXtrSetField.

The glossaries package provides \ifglshasfield to determine if a field has been set. The glossaries-extra package provides a simpler version:


\glsxtrifhasfield  \glsxtrifhasfield{field}{label}{true}{false}

(New to v1.19.) Note that in this case the ⟨field⟩ must be the internal field label (for example, useri rather than user1). Unlike \ifglshasfield, this version doesn’t complain if the entry (given by ⟨label⟩) or the field don’t exist and will simply do ⟨false⟩. If the field does exist for the given entry and it’s not empty, the ⟨true⟩ part is done otherwise it does ⟨false⟩. Within ⟨true⟩ you may use


\glscurrentfieldvalue  \glscurrentfieldvalue

to access the field value. This command includes grouping which scopes the ⟨true⟩ and ⟨false⟩ parts. The starred version


\glsxtrifhasfield*  \glsxtrifhasfield*{field}{label}{true}{false}

omits the implicit grouping.

Be careful of keys that use \relax as the default value (such as the symbol). Use \ifglshassymbol instead.

There is also a version that simply uses \ifcsundef. It doesn’t save the field value, but can be used if you only need to check if the field is defined without accessing it:


\GlsXtrIfFieldUndef  \GlsXtrIfFieldUndef{field}{label}{true}{false}

There’s a difference between an undefined field and an unset field. An undefined field hasn’t been assigned any value (no associated internal control sequence has been defined). If a defined field has been defined to empty, then it’s considered unset. \GlsXtrIfFieldUndef implement ⟨false⟩ for a defined but empty field whereas \glsxtrifhasfield and \ifglshasfield will implement ⟨false⟩ a defined but empty field. Remember that any keys that may be used in \newglossaryentry will have a default value if not provided. In many cases, the default value is empty, so only use \GlsXtrIfFieldUndef for fields that can only be defined through commands like \GlsXtrSetField.

You can test if a field value equals a string using


\GlsXtrIfFieldEqStr  \GlsXtrIfFieldEqStr{field}{label}{text}{true} {false}

If the entry exists and has the given field set to the given text then this does ⟨true⟩ otherwise it does ⟨false⟩. This is just a shortcut that uses:


\GlsXtrIfFieldCmpStr  \GlsXtrIfFieldCmpStr{field}{label}{comparison} {text}{true}{false}

This in turn is just a shortcut that uses \glsxtrifhasfield to test if the field exists and then compares the replacement text of \glscurrentfieldvalue with ⟨text⟩ using etoolbox’s \ifdefstring. The ⟨comparison⟩ argument must be one of = (equality), < (less than) or > (greater than).

As from version 1.31, there’s a similar command:


\GlsXtrIfFieldEqXpStr  \GlsXtrIfFieldEqXpStr{field}{label}{text} {true}{false}

This is like \GlsXtrIfFieldEqStr but first (protected) fully expands ⟨text⟩ (but not the field value). If you want to compare the (protected) full expansion of both the field value and ⟨text⟩ use:


\GlsXtrIfXpFieldEqXpStr  \GlsXtrIfXpFieldEqXpStr{field}{label}{text} {true}{false}

As from v1.31, if a field represents a numeric (integer) value, you can use the following two numeric tests. If the field is set, it must expand to an integer. You may use \glscurrentfieldvalue within ⟨true⟩ or ⟨false⟩ to access the actual value. Both ⟨true⟩ and ⟨false⟩ are scoped. If the field is undefined or empty, the value is assumed to be 0, and \glscurrentfieldvalue is set accordingly.

To test if the value is non-zero:


\GlsXtrIfFieldNonZero  \GlsXtrIfFieldNonZero{field}{label}{true} {false}

Alternatively, you can test if the field expands to a specific number using:


\GlsXtrIfFieldEqNum  \GlsXtrIfFieldEqNum{field}{label}{n}{true} {false}

This does ⟨true⟩ if the field value equals ⟨n⟩ (using \ifnum for the comparison) otherwise it does ⟨false⟩.

The glossaries package provides \glsfieldfetch which can be used to fetch the value of the given field and store it in a control sequence. The glossaries-extra package provides another way of accessing the field value:


\glsxtrusefield  \glsxtrusefield{entry-label}{field-label}

This works in the same way as commands like \glsentrytext but the field label is specified in the first argument. Note that the ⟨field-label⟩ corresponds to the internal field tag, which isn’t always the same as the key name. See Table 4.1 of the glossaries manual. No error occurs if the entry or field haven’t been defined. This command is not robust.

There is also a version that converts the first letter to uppercase (analogous to \Glsentrytext):


\Glsxtrusefield  \Glsxtrusefield{entry-label}{field-label}

If you want to use a field to store a list that can be used as an etoolbox internal list, you can use the following command that adds an item to the field using etoolbox’s \listcsadd:


\glsxtrfieldlistadd  \glsxtrfieldlistadd{label}{field}{item}

where ⟨label⟩ is the entry’s label, ⟨field⟩ is the entry’s field and ⟨item⟩ is the item to add. There are analogous commands that use \listgadd, \listeadd and \listxadd:


\glsxtrfieldlistgadd  \glsxtrfieldlistgadd{label}{field}{item}


\glsxtrfieldlisteadd  \glsxtrfieldlisteadd{label}{field}{item}


\glsxtrfieldlistxadd  \glsxtrfieldlistxadd{label}{field}{item}

You can then iterate over the list using:


\glsxtrfielddolistloop  \glsxtrfielddolistloop{label}{field}

or


\glsxtrfieldforlistloop  \glsxtrfieldforlistloop{label}{field} {handler}

that internally use \dolistcsloop and \forlistloop, respectively.

There are also commands that use \ifinlistcs:


\glsxtrfieldifinlist  \glsxtrfieldifinlist{label}{field}{item}{true} {false}

and \xifinlistcs


\glsxtrfieldxifinlist  \glsxtrfieldxifinlist{label}{field}{item} {true}{false}

See the etoolbox’s user manual for further details of these commands, in particular the limitations of \ifinlist.

If the field has a comma-separated list value instead, you can iterate over it using:


\glsxtrforcsvfield  \glsxtrforcsvfield{label}{field}{handler}

where again ⟨handler⟩ is a control sequence that takes a single argument. Unlike the etoolbox loops, this doesn’t ignore empty elements nor does it discard leading / trailing spaces. Internally it uses \@for (modified by xfor which is automatically loaded by glossaries). The xfor package modifies the behaviour of \@for to allow the loop to be broken prematurely using \@endfortrue. The \glsxtrforcsvfield command locally defines a user level command:


\glsxtrendfor  \glsxtrendfor

which is just a synonym for \@endfortrue.

The loop is performed within the true part of \glsxtrifhasfield so scoping is automatically applied.

As from version 1.32, if the field given by


\GlsXtrForeignTextField  \GlsXtrForeignTextField

(which defaults to userii) contains a locale tag, then


\GlsXtrForeignText  \GlsXtrForeignText{entry label}{text}

can be used to encapsulate ⟨text⟩ in \foreignlanguage{dialect}{text} where ⟨dialect⟩ is obtained from the locale tag through tracklang’s \GetTrackedDialectFromLanguageTag command. You need at least tracklang v1.3.6 for this to work properly. The ⟨dialect⟩ must be one that’s tracked (which typically means that babel or polyglossia has been loaded with the appropriate setting for that language). If \foreignlanguage hasn’t been defined, this just does ⟨text⟩. For example:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage[main=british,brazilian,ngerman]{babel}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\setabbreviationstyle{long-short-user}  
\newabbreviation  
 [user1={Associa\c{c}\~ao Brasileria de Normas T\'ecnicas},  
  user2= {pt-BR}  
 ]  
 {abnt}{ABNT}{Brazilian National Standards Organization}  
\newabbreviation  
 [user1={Deutsches Institut f\"ur Normung e.V.},  
  user2={de-DE-1996}]  
 {din}{DIN}{German Institute for Standardization}  
\renewcommand*{\glsxtruserparen}[2]{%  
  \glsxtrfullsep{#2}%  
  \glsxtrparen  
  {#1%  
   \ifglshasfield{\glsxtruserfield}{#2}%  
   {, \emph{\GlsXtrForeignText{#2}{\glscurrentfieldvalue}}}%  
   {}%  
  }%  
}  
\begin{document}  
\gls{abnt}, \gls{din}.  
\end{document}

When using the record option, in addition to recording the usual location, you can also record the current value of another counter at the same time using the preamble-only command:


\GlsXtrRecordCounter  \GlsXtrRecordCounter{counter name}

For example:

\usepackage[record]{glossaries-extra}  
\GlsXtrRecordCounter{section}

Each time an entry is referenced with commands like \gls or \glstext, the .aux file will not only contain the \glsxtr@record command but also

\glsxtr@counterrecord{label}{section}{n}
where ⟨n⟩ is the current expansion of \thesection and ⟨label⟩ is the entry’s label. On the next run, when the .aux file is run, this command will do
\glsxtrfieldlistgadd{label}{record.counter}{n}
In the above example, if \gls{bird} is used in section 1.2 this would be
\glsxtrfieldlistgadd{bird}{record.section}{1.2}

Note that there’s no key corresponding to this new record.section field, but its value can be accessed with \glsxtrfielduse or the list can be iterated over with \glsxtrfielddolistloop etc.

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10.2 Display All Entries Without Sorting or Indexing


\printunsrtglossary  \printunsrtglossary[options]

This behaves like \printnoidxglossary but never sorts the entries and always lists all the defined entries for the given glossary (and doesn’t require \makenoidxglossaries). If you want to use one of the tabular-like styles with \printunsrtglossary, make sure you load glossaries-extra-stylemods which modifies the definition of \glsgroupskip to avoid the “Incomplete \iftrue” error that may otherwise occur.

There’s also a starred form


\printunsrtglossary*  \printunsrtglossary*[options]{code}

which is equivalent to

\begingroup
 code\printunsrtglossary[options]%
\endgroup
Note that unlike \glossarypreamble, the supplied ⟨code⟩ is done before the glossary header.

This means you now have the option to simply list all entries on the first LATEX run without the need for a post-processor, however there will be no number list in this case, as that has to be set by a post-processor such as bib2gls (see §9 bib2gls: Managing Reference Databases).

No attempt is made to gather hierarchical elements. If child entries aren’t defined immediately after their parent entry, they won’t be together in the glossary when using \printunsrtglossary.

There’s a difference in behaviour depending on whether or not the group key is defined. If not defined (default), the group label will be formed from the first letter of the name field. The corresponding group title will be obtained as discussed in §2.10 Glossary Style Modifications. This can lead to an odd effect if you are using a style that separates letter groups when the ordering isn’t alphabetical.

If the group key is defined (which it is with the record option) then the group label will be obtained from the value of that field. If the field is empty, no grouping is performed, even if the style supports it. (That is, there won’t be a header or a vertical separation.) If the group field is non-empty, then the corresponding title is obtained as described earlier.

If you want to use a different field, you can redefine


\glsxtrgroupfield  \glsxtrgroupfield

to the relevant internal field label, but the group key must still be defined (through the record option or with commands like \glsaddstoragekey) to ensure that \printunsrtglossary uses \glsxtrgroupfield. (This method is used by bib2gls for secondary entries, which have the group label stored in the secondarygroup internal field.)

If you have any entries with the see key set, you will need the glossaries package option seenoindex=ignore or seenoindex=warn to prevent an error occurring from the automated \glssee normally triggered by this key. The record=only package option will automatically deal with this.

For example:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\newglossaryentry{zebra}{name={zebra},description={stripy animal}}  
\newglossaryentry{ant}{name={ant},description={an insect}}  
\begin{document}  
\gls{ant} and \gls{zebra}  
\printunsrtglossaries  
\end{document}

In the above, zebra will be listed before ant as it was defined first.

If you allow document definitions with the docdefs option, the document will require a second LATEX run if the entries are defined after \printunsrtglossary.

The optional argument is as for \printnoidxglossary (except for the sort key, which isn’t available).

All glossaries may be displayed in the order of their definition using:


\printunsrtglossaries  \printunsrtglossaries

which is analogous to \printnoidxglossaries. This just iterates over all defined glossaries (that aren’t on the ignored list) and does \printunsrtglossary[type=⟨type⟩].

To avoid complications caused by tabular-like glossary styles, \printunsrtglossary iterates over all entries in the selected glossary and appends the appropriate code to an internal command. Once the construction of this command is complete, then it’s performed to display the glossary. This puts the loop outside the style code. For convenience, there’s a hook used within the loop:


\printunsrtglossaryentryprocesshook  \printunsrtglossaryentryprocesshook {label}

This hook should not display any content, but may be used to perform calculations. For example, to calculate widths. Within this hook you can use:


\printunsrtglossaryskipentry  \printunsrtglossaryskipentry

to skip the current entry. This will prevent the entry from being added to the internal command.

There’s another hook immediately before the internal command containing the glossary code is performed:


\printunsrtglossarypredoglossary  \printunsrtglossarypredoglossary

The internal command uses


\printunsrtglossaryhandler  \printunsrtglossaryhandler{label}

to display each item in the list, where ⟨label⟩ is the current label.

By default the handler just does


\glsxtrunsrtdo  \glsxtrunsrtdo{label}

which determines whether to use \glossentry or \subglossentry and checks the location and loclist fields for the number list.

You can redefine the handler if required. For example, you may want to filter entries according to the category label. You can test if a label is contained in a comma-separated list of labels using:


\glsxtriflabelinlist  \glsxtriflabelinlist{label}{label list}{true} {false}

The ⟨label⟩ and ⟨label list⟩ will be fully expanded.

If you redefine the handler to exclude entries, you may end up with an empty glossary. This could cause a problem for the list-based styles.

For example, if the preamble includes:

\usepackage[record,style=index]{glossaries-extra}  
\GlsXtrRecordCounter{section}

then you can print the glossary but first redefine the handler to only select entries that include the current section number in the record.section field:

\renewcommand{\printunsrtglossaryhandler}[1]{%  
  \glsxtrfieldxifinlist{#1}{record.section}{\thesection}  
  {\glsxtrunsrtdo{#1}}%  
  {}%  
}

Alternatively you can use the starred form of \printunsrtglossary which will localise the change:

\printunsrtglossary*{%  
  \renewcommand{\printunsrtglossaryhandler}[1]{%  
    \glsxtrfieldxifinlist{#1}{record.section}{\thesection}  
    {\glsxtrunsrtdo{#1}}%  
    {}%  
  }%  
}

If you are using the hyperref package and want to display the same glossary more than once, you can also add a temporary redefinition of \glolinkprefix to avoid duplicate hypertarget names. For example:

\printunsrtglossary*{%  
  \renewcommand{\printunsrtglossaryhandler}[1]{%  
    \glsxtrfieldxifinlist{#1}{record.section}{\thesection}  
    {\glsxtrunsrtdo{#1}}%  
    {}%  
  }%  
  \ifcsundef{theHsection}%  
  {%  
    \renewcommand*{\glolinkprefix}{record.#2.\csuse{thesection}.}%  
  }%  
  {%  
    \renewcommand*{\glolinkprefix}{record.#2.\csuse{theHsection}.}%  
  }%  
}

Note that this will cause a problem if your descriptions contain commands like \gls that need to link an entry that doesn’t appear in the summary. In this case, it’s a better approach to use:

\printunsrtglossary*{%  
  \renewcommand{\printunsrtglossaryhandler}[1]{%  
    \glsxtrfieldxifinlist{#1}{record.section}{\thesection}  
    {\glsxtrunsrtdo{#1}}%  
    {}%  
  }%  
  \ifcsundef{theHsection}%  
  {%  
    \setkeys{printgloss}{targetnameprefix={record.#2.\csuse{thesection}.}}%  
  }%  
  {%  
    \setkeys{printgloss}{targetnameprefix={record.#2.\csuse{theHsection}.}}%  
  }%  
}

If it’s a short summary at the start of a section, you might also want to suppress the glossary header and add some vertical space afterwards:

\printunsrtglossary*{%  
  \renewcommand{\printunsrtglossaryhandler}[1]{%  
    \glsxtrfieldxifinlist{#1}{record.section}{\thesection}  
    {\glsxtrunsrtdo{#1}}%  
    {}%  
  }%  
  \ifcsundef{theHsection}%  
  {%  
    \renewcommand*{\glolinkprefix}{record.#2.\csuse{thesection}.}%  
  }%  
  {%  
    \renewcommand*{\glolinkprefix}{record.#2.\csuse{theHsection}.}%  
  }%  
  \renewcommand*{\glossarysection}[2][]{}%  
  \appto\glossarypostamble{\glspar\medskip\glspar}%  
}

There’s a shortcut command that essentially does this:


\printunsrtglossaryunit  \printunsrtglossaryunit[options]{counter name}

The above example can simply be replaced with:

\printunsrtglossaryunit{section}

This shortcut command is actually defined to use \printunsrtglossary* with


\printunsrtglossaryunitsetup  \printunsrtglossaryunitsetup{counter name}

so if you want to just make some minor modifications you can do

\printunsrtglossary*{\printunsrtglossaryunitsetup{section}%  
  \renewcommand*{\glossarysection}[2][]{\subsection*{Summary}}%  
}

which will start the list with a subsection header with the title “Summary” (overriding the glossary’s title).

Note that this shortcut command is only available with the record (or record=alsoindex) package option.

This temporary change in the hypertarget prefix means you need to explicitly use \hyperlink to create a link to it as commands like \gls will try to link to the target created with the default definition of \gloslinkprefix. This isn’t a problem if you want a primary glossary of all terms produced using just \printunsrtglossary (in the front or back matter) which can be the target for all glossary references and then just use \printunsrtglossaryunit for a quick summary at the start of a section etc.

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10.3 Standalone Entry Items

It may be that you don’t want a list but would rather display entry details throughout the document. You can simply do \glsentryname followed by \glsentrydesc. (Remember that if you don’t want a sorted list, use sort=none to skip the construction of the sort field.) For example, in the preamble provide a custom command:

\newcommand{\displayterm}[1]{%  
 \par\medskip\par\noindent  
 Definition: \glsentryname{#1}.\par  
 \glsentrydesc{#1}  
 \par\medskip  
}

define your entries

\newglossaryentry{function}{name={function},  
  description={a relation or expression involving variables}  
}

and then later in the text:

\displayterm{function}

However, if may be that you want to use hyperref and have commands like \gls link back to the place where the term is described. Instead of using \glsentryname use


\glsxtrglossentry  \glsxtrglossentry{label}

where ⟨label⟩ is the entry’s label.

This is designed to behave much like the way the name is displayed in the glossary. It performs the following:

If you have used \nopostdesc or \glsxtrnopostpunc in any of your description fields, you can use


\glsxtractivatenopost  \glsxtractivatenopost

to make these commands behave as they normally do within a glossary. This needs to be placed before

\glossentrydesc{label}\glspostdescription
and scoped. Note that \glsnonextpages and \glsnextpages have no effect outside of the glossary and are not intended for use in a standalone context.

It’s also possible to select a different field (rather than using name):


\glsxtrglossentryother  \glsxtrglossentryother{header}{label}{field}

The ⟨field⟩ must be given using its internal field label which may not be the same as the key used to set the field. See the key to field mappings table in the glossaries user manual. The ⟨header⟩ argument is the code to pass to the third argument of \glsxtrtitleorpdforheading. It may be left empty in which case the default is determined as follows:

The \glsxtrglossentryother command internally uses \glossentrynameother{label} {field} instead of \glossentryname{label}. If you are using the glossaries-accsupp package (through the accsupp option) then accessibility support will be provided if there’s a corresponding command

\glsfieldaccessdisplay{text}{label}
(for example, \glssymbolaccessdisplay).

This means that my custom command can be changed to:

\newcommand{\displayterm}[1]{%  
 \par\medskip\par\noindent  
 Definition: \glsxtrglossentry{#1}.\par  
 \glsentrydesc{#1}  
 \par\medskip  
}

If I want numbered definitions, then I can use the package options entrycounter or subentrycounter and remove the colon:

\newcommand{\displayterm}[1]{%  
 \par\medskip\par\noindent  
 Definition \glsxtrglossentry{#1}.\par  
 \glsentrydesc{#1}  
 \par\medskip  
}

The counter label uses a dot after the number by default but this can be changed to a colon:

\renewcommand*{\glsentrycounterlabel}{\theglossaryentry:\space}

It’s now possible to not only use \gls to link back to the definition but also use \glsrefentry to reference the counter and \glsxtrpageref to reference the page number.

If I want the description to behave more like it does in a glossary in need to make the following modification:

\newcommand{\displayterm}[1]{%  
 \par\medskip\par\noindent  
 Definition \glsxtrglossentry{#1}.\par  
 \begingroup  
  \glsxtractivatenopost  
  \glossentrydesc{#1}\glspostdescription  
 \endgroup  
 \par\medskip  
}

(Note the grouping to localise \glsxtractivatenopost.)

You can also use \glsxtrglossentry within section headings. For example:

\section{\glsxtrglossentry{function}}

This will use \glsentryname in PDF bookmarks (if \texorpdfstring is defined) and will use \glsxtrheadname in page headers and table of contents. (If you’re using a page style or table of contents that doesn’t use \markright or \markbook or \@starttoc then you need to insert \glsxtrmarkhook and \@glsxtrinmark at the start of the header or table of contents either scoped or afterwards cancelled with \@glsxtrnotinmark and \glsxtrrestoremarkhook.)

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10.4 Entry Aliases

An entry can be made an alias of another entry using the alias key. The value should be the label of the other term. There’s no check for the other’s existence when the aliased entry is defined. This is to allow the possibility of defining the other entry after the aliased entry. (For example, when used with bib2gls.)

If an entry ⟨entry-1⟩ is made an alias of ⟨entry-2⟩ then:

The index suppression trigger is performed by


\glsxtrsetaliasnoindex  \glsxtrsetaliasnoindex

This is performed after the default options provided by \GlsXtrSetDefaultGlsOpts have been set. With record=only, \glsxtrsetaliasnoindex will default to do nothing.

Within the definition of \glsxtrsetaliasnoindex you can use


\glsxtrindexaliased  \glsxtrindexaliased

to index ⟨entry-2⟩.

The index suppression command can be redefined to index the main term instead. For example:

\renewcommand{\glsxtrsetaliasnoindex}{%  
 \glsxtrindexaliased  
 \setkeys{glslink}{noindex}%  
}

The value of the alias field can be accessed using


\glsxtralias  \glsxtralias{label}

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11. Supplemental Packages

The glossaries bundle provides additional support packages glossaries-prefix (for prefixing) and glossaries-accsupp (for accessibility support). These packages aren’t automatically loaded.

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11.1 Prefixes or Determiners

If prefixing is required, you can simply load glossaries-prefix after glossaries-extra. For example:

\documentclass{article}  
\usepackage{glossaries-extra}  
\usepackage{glossaries-prefix}  
\makeglossaries  
\newabbreviation  
 [prefix={an\space},  
 prefixfirst={a~}]  
 {svm}{SVM}{support vector machine}  
\begin{document}  
First use: \pgls{svm}.  
Next use: \pgls{svm}.  
\printglossaries  
\end{document}

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11.2 Accessibility Support

The glossaries-accsupp package needs to be loaded before glossaries-extra or through the accsupp package option:

\usepackage[accsupp]{glossaries-extra}

If you don’t load glossaries-accsupp or you load glossaries-accsupp after glossaries-extra the new \glsaccessxxx⟩ commands described below will simply be equivalent to the corresponding \glsentryxxx⟩ commands.

The following \glsaccessxxx⟩ commands add accessibility information wrapped around the corresponding \glsentryxxx⟩ commands. There is no check for existence of the entry nor do any of these commands add formatting, hyperlinks or indexing information.


\glsaccessname  \glsaccessname{label}

This displays the value of the name field for the entry identified by ⟨label⟩.

If the glossaries-accsupp package isn’t loaded, this is simply defined as:

\newcommand*{\glsaccessname}[1]{\glsentryname{#1}}

otherwise it’s defined as:

\newcommand*{\glsaccessname}[1]{%  
  \glsnameaccessdisplay  
  {%  
    \glsentryname{#1}%  
  }%  
  {#1}%  
}

(\glsnameaccessdisplay is defined by the glossaries-accsupp package.) The first letter upper case version is:


\Glsaccessname  \Glsaccessname{label}

Without the glossaries-accsupp package this is just defined as:

\newcommand*{\Glsaccessname}[1]{\Glsentryname{#1}}

With the glossaries-accsupp package this is defined as:

\newcommand*{\Glsaccessname}[1]{%  
  \glsnameaccessdisplay  
  {%  
    \Glsentryname{#1}%  
  }%  
  {#1}%  
}

The following commands are all defined in an analogous manner.


\glsaccesstext  \glsaccesstext{label}

This displays the value of the text field.


\Glsaccesstext  \Glsaccesstext{label}

This displays the value of the text field with the first letter converted to upper case.


\glsaccessplural  \glsaccessplural{label}

This displays the value of the plural field.


\Glsaccessplural  \Glsaccessplural{label}

This displays the value of the plural field with the first letter converted to upper case.


\glsaccessfirst  \glsaccessfirst{label}

This displays the value of the first field.


\Glsaccessfirst  \Glsaccessfirst{label}

This displays the value of the first field with the first letter converted to upper case.


\glsaccessfirstplural  \glsaccessfirstplural{label}

This displays the value of the firstplural field.


\Glsaccessfirstplural  \Glsaccessfirstplural{label}

This displays the value of the firstplural field with the first letter converted to upper case.


\glsaccesssymbol  \glsaccesssymbol{label}

This displays the value of the symbol field.


\Glsaccesssymbol  \Glsaccesssymbol{label}

This displays the value of the symbol field with the first letter converted to upper case.


\glsaccesssymbolplural  \glsaccesssymbolplural{label}

This displays the value of the symbolplural field.


\Glsaccesssymbolplural  \Glsaccesssymbolplural{label}

This displays the value of the symbolplural field with the first letter converted to upper case.


\glsaccessdesc  \glsaccessdesc{label}

This displays the value of the desc field.


\Glsaccessdesc  \Glsaccessdesc{label}

This displays the value of the desc field with the first letter converted to upper case.


\glsaccessdescplural  \glsaccessdescplural{label}

This displays the value of the descplural field.


\Glsaccessdescplural  \Glsaccessdescplural{label}

This displays the value of the descplural field with the first letter converted to upper case.


\glsaccessshort  \glsaccessshort{label}

This displays the value of the short field.


\Glsaccessshort  \Glsaccessshort{label}

This displays the value of the short field with the first letter converted to upper case.


\glsaccessshortpl  \glsaccessshortpl{label}

This displays the value of the shortplural field.


\Glsaccessshortpl  \Glsaccessshortpl{label}

This displays the value of the shortplural field with the first letter converted to upper case.


\glsaccesslong  \glsaccesslong{label}

This displays the value of the long field.


\Glsaccesslong  \Glsaccesslong{label}

This displays the value of the long field with the first letter converted to upper case.


\glsaccesslongpl  \glsaccesslongpl{label}

This displays the value of the longplural field.


\Glsaccesslongpl  \Glsaccesslongpl{label}

This displays the value of the longplural field with the first letter converted to upper case.

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12. Sample Files

The following sample files are provided with this package:

sample.tex
Simple sample file that uses one of the dummy files provided by the glossaries package for testing.
sample-abbr-styles.tex
Demonstrates all predefined abbreviation styles.
sample-mixture.tex
General entries, acronyms and initialisms all treated differently.
sample-name-font
Categories and attributes are used to customize the way different entries appear.
sample-abbrv.tex
General abbreviations.
sample-acronym.tex
Acronyms aren’t initialisms and don’t expand on first use.
sample-acronym-desc.tex
Acronyms that have a separate long form and description.
sample-crossref.tex
Unused entries that have been cross-referenced automatically are added at the end of the document.
sample-indexhook.tex
Use the index hook to track which entries have been indexed (and therefore find out which ones haven’t been indexed).
sample-footnote.tex
Footnote abbreviation style that moves the footnote marker outside of the hyperlink generated by \gls and moves it after certain punctuation characters for neatness.
sample-undef.tex
Warn on undefined entries instead of generating an error.
sample-mixed-abbrv-styles.tex
Different abbreviation styles for different entries.
sample-initialisms.tex
Automatically insert dots into initialisms.
sample-postdot.tex
Another initialisms example.
sample-postlink.tex
Automatically inserting text after the link-text produced by commands like \gls (outside of hyperlink, if present).
sample-header.tex
Using entries in section/chapter headings.
sample-autoindex.tex
Using the dualindex and indexname attributes to automatically add glossary entries to the index (in addition to the glossary location list).
sample-autoindex-hyp.tex
As previous but uses hyperref.
sample-nested.tex
Using \gls within the value of the name key.
sample-entrycount.tex
Enable entry-use counting (only index if used more than n times, see §6.1 Entry Counting (First Use Flag)).
sample-unitentrycount.tex
Enable use of per-unit entry-use counting (§6.1 Entry Counting (First Use Flag)).
sample-onelink.tex
Using the per-unit entry counting (§6.1 Entry Counting (First Use Flag)) to only have one hyperlink per entry per page.
sample-linkcount.tex
Using link counting (§6.2 Link Counting) to only have one hyperlink per entry.
sample-pages.tex
Insert “page” or “pages” before the location list.
sample-altmodifier.tex
Set the default options for commands like \gls and add an alternative modifier.
sample-mixedsort.tex
Uses the optional argument of \makeglossaries to allow a mixture of \printglossary and \printnoidxglossary.
sample-external.tex
Uses the targeturl attribute to allow for entries that should link to an external URL rather than to an internal glossary.
sample-fmt.tex
Provides text-block commands associated with entries in order to use \glsxtrfmt.
sample-alias.tex
Uses the alias key. (See §10.4 Entry Aliases.)
sample-alttree.tex
Uses the glossaries-extra-stylemods package with the alttree style (see §2.10.3 The glossaries-extra-stylemods Package).
sample-alttree-sym.tex
Another alttree example that measures the symbol widths.
sample-alttree-marginpar.tex
Another alttree example that puts the number list in the margin.
sample-onthefly.tex
Using on-the-fly commands. Terms with accents must have the name key explicitly set.
sample-onthefly-xetex.tex
Using on-the-fly commands with XƎLATEX. Terms with UTF-8 characters don’t need to have the name key explicitly set. Terms that contain commands must have the name key explicitly set with the commands removed from the label.
sample-onthefly-utf8.tex
Tries to emulate the previous sample file for use with LATEX through the starred version of \GlsXtrEnableOnTheFly. This is a bit iffy and may not always work. Terms that contain commands must have the name key explicitly set with the commands removed from the label.
sample-accsupp.tex
Integrate glossaries-accsupp.
sample-prefix.tex
Integrate glossaries-prefix.
sample-suppl-main.tex
Uses thevalue to reference a location in the supplementary file sample-suppl.tex.
sample-suppl-main-hyp.tex
A more complicated version to the above that uses the hyperref package to reference a location in the supplementary file sample-suppl-hyp.tex.

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13. Multi-Lingual Support

There’s only one command provided by glossaries-extra that you’re likely to want to change in your document and that’s \abbreviationsname (§1.2 New or Modified Package Options) if you use the abbreviations package option to automatically create the glossary labelled abbreviations. If this command doesn’t already exist, it will be defined to “Abbreviations” if babel hasn’t been loaded, otherwise it will be defined as \acronymname (provided by glossaries).

You can redefine it in the usual way. For example:

\renewcommand*{\abbreviationsname}{List of Abbreviations}

Or using babel or polyglossia captions hook:

\appto\captionsenglish{%  
 \renewcommand*{\abbreviationsname}{List of Abbreviations}%  
}

Alternatively you can use the title key when you print the list of abbreviations. For example:

\printabbreviations[title={List of Abbreviations}]

or

\printglossary[type=abbreviations,title={List of Abbreviations}]

The other fixed text commands are the diagnostic messages, which shouldn’t appear in the final draft of your document.

The glossaries-extra package has the facility to load language modules (whose filename is in the form glossariesxtr-language.ldf) if they exist, but won’t warn if they don’t. If glossaries-extra-bib2gls is loaded via the record package option then the check for language resource files will additionally search for an associated language script file given by glossariesxtr-script.ldf where ⟨script⟩ is the four letter script identifier, such as Latn, associated with the given dialect. There’s no warning if the associated file isn’t found. The script file is loaded after the dialect file.

If you want to write your own language module, you just need to create a file called glossariesxtr-lang.ldf, where ⟨lang⟩ identifies the language or dialect (see the tracklang package). For example, glossariesxtr-french.ldf.

The simplest code for this file is:

\ProvidesGlossariesExtraLang{french}[2015/12/09 v1.0]  
\newcommand*{\glossariesxtrcaptionsfrench}{%  
 \def\abbreviationsname{Abr\'eviations}%  
}  
\glossariesxtrcaptionsfrench  
\ifcsdef{captions\CurrentTrackedDialect}  
{%  
  \csappto{captions\CurrentTrackedDialect}%  
  {%  
    \glossariesxtrcaptionsfrench  
  }%  
}%  
{%  
  \ifcsdef{captions\CurrentTrackedLanguage}  
  {%  
    \csappto{captions\CurrentTrackedLanguage}%  
    {%  
      \glossariesxtrcaptionsfrench  
    }%  
  }%  
  {}%  
}

You can adapt this for other languages by replacing all instances of the language identifier french and the translated text Abr\’eviations as appropriate. You can also use the .ldf file to provide rule blocks for a particular language for use with bib2gls’s custom sort rule. See §9.3 The glossaries-extra-bib2gls package for further details.

This .ldf file then needs to be put somewhere on TEX’s path so that it can be found by glossaries-extra. You might also want to consider uploading it to CTAN so that it can be useful to others. (Please don’t send it to me. I already have more packages than I am able to maintain.)

If you additionally want to provide translations for the diagnostic messages used when a glossary is missing, you need to redefine the following commands:


\GlsXtrNoGlsWarningHead  \GlsXtrNoGlsWarningHead{label}{file}

This produces the following text in English:

This document is incomplete. The external file associated with the glossary ‘⟨label⟩’ (which should be called ⟨file⟩) hasn’t been created.


\GlsXtrNoGlsWarningEmptyStart  \GlsXtrNoGlsWarningEmptyStart

This produces the following text in English:

This has probably happened because there are no entries defined in this glossary.


\GlsXtrNoGlsWarningEmptyMain  \GlsXtrNoGlsWarningEmptyMain

This produces the following text in English:

If you don’t want this glossary, add nomain to your package option list when you load glossaries-extra.sty. For example:


\GlsXtrNoGlsWarningEmptyNotMain  \GlsXtrNoGlsWarningEmptyNotMain{label}

This produces the following text in English:

Did you forget to use type=label⟩ when you defined your entries? If you tried to load entries into this glossary with \loadglsentries did you remember to use [label] as the optional argument? If you did, check that the definitions in the file you loaded all had the type set to \glsdefaulttype.


\GlsXtrNoGlsWarningCheckFile  \GlsXtrNoGlsWarningCheckFile{file}

This produces the following text in English:

Check the contents of the file ⟨file⟩. If it’s empty, that means you haven’t indexed any of your entries in this glossary (using commands like \gls or \glsadd) so this list can’t be generated. If the file isn’t empty, the document build process hasn’t been completed.


\GlsXtrNoGlsWarningMisMatch  \GlsXtrNoGlsWarningMisMatch

This produces the following text in English:

You need to either replace \makenoidxglossaries with \makeglossaries or replace \printglossary (or \printglossaries) with \printnoidxglossary (or \printnoidxglossaries) and then rebuild this document.


\GlsXtrNoGlsWarningNoOut  \GlsXtrNoGlsWarningNoOut{file}

This produces the following text in English:

The file ⟨file⟩ doesn’t exist. This most likely means you haven’t used \makeglossaries or you have used \nofiles. If this is just a draft version of the document, you can suppress this message using the nomissingglstext package option.


\GlsXtrNoGlsWarningTail  \GlsXtrNoGlsWarningTail

This produces the following text in English:

This message will be removed once the problem has been fixed.


\GlsXtrNoGlsWarningBuildInfo  \GlsXtrNoGlsWarningBuildInfo

This is advice on how to generate the glossary files. See the documented code (glossaries-extra-code.pdf) for further details.


\GlsXtrNoGlsWarningAutoMake  \GlsXtrNoGlsWarningAutoMake{label}

This is the message produced when the automake option is used, but the document needs a rerun or the shell escape setting doesn’t permit the execution of the external application. This command also generates a warning in the transcript file. See the documented code for further details.

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Glossary

bib2gls
A command line Java application that selects entries from a .bib file and converts them to glossary definitions (like bibtex but also performs hierarchical sorting and collation, thus omitting the need for xindy or makeindex). Further details at: http://www.dickimaw-books.com/software/bib2gls/.
entry location
The location of the entry in the document. This defaults to the page number on which the entry appears. An entry may have multiple locations.
first use
The first time a glossary entry is used (from the start of the document or after a reset) with one of the following commands: \gls, \Gls, \GLS, \glspl, \Glspl, \GLSpl or \glsdisp.
first use flag
A conditional that determines whether or not the entry has been used according to the rules of first use.
first use text
The text that is displayed on first use, which is governed by the first and firstplural keys of \newglossaryentry. (May be overridden by \glsdisp.)
link-text
The text produced by commands such as \gls. It may or may not have a hyperlink to the glossary.
location list
A list of entry locations. See number list.
makeglossaries
A custom designed Perl script interface provided with the glossaries package to run xindy or makeindex according to the document settings.
makeglossaries-lite
A custom designed Lua script interface to xindy and makeindex provided with the glossaries package. This is a cut-down alternative to the Perl makeglossaries script. If you have Perl installed, use the Perl script instead. This script is distributed in the source code on CTAN with the file name makeglossaries-lite.lua but TeX Live on Unix-like systems creates a symbolic link called makeglossaries-lite (without the .lua extension) to the actual makeglossaries-lite.lua script, and TEX distributions on Windows convert the script to an executable makeglossaries-lite.exe.
makeindex
An indexing application.
number list
A list of entry locations (also called a location list). The number list can be suppressed using the nonumberlist package option.
xindy
An flexible indexing application with multilingual support written in Perl.

Index

A

abbreviation styles (deprecated):
    footnote-em  1
    footnote-sc  2
    footnote-sm  3
    long-desc-em  4
    long-desc-sc  5
    long-desc-sm  6
    long-em  7
    long-sc  8
    long-sm  9
    postfootnote-em  10
    postfootnote-sc  11
    postfootnote-sm  12
abbreviation styles:
    footnote  13
    long  14
    long-desc  15
    long-em-noshort-em  16, 17, 18
    long-em-noshort-em-desc  19, 20
    long-em-noshort-em-desc-noreg  21
    long-em-noshort-em-noreg  22, 23, 24
    long-em-short-em  25, 26, 27, 28
    long-em-short-em-desc  29
    long-hyphen-long-hyphen  30
    long-hyphen-noshort-desc-noreg  31, 32
    long-hyphen-noshort-noreg  33, 34
    long-hyphen-postshort-hyphen  35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40
    long-hyphen-postshort-hyphen-desc  41
    long-hyphen-short-hyphen  42, 43, 44, 45, 46
    long-hyphen-short-hyphen-desc  47, 48
    long-noshort  49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57
    long-noshort-desc  58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67
    long-noshort-desc-noreg  68
    long-noshort-em  69
    long-noshort-em-desc  70
    long-noshort-noreg  71
    long-noshort-sc  72, 73
    long-noshort-sc-desc  74, 75
    long-noshort-sm  76
    long-noshort-sm-desc  77
    long-only-short-only  78, 79, 80
    long-only-short-only-desc  81
    long-postshort-user  82, 83
    long-postshort-user-desc  84
    long-short  85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100
    long-short-desc  101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109
    long-short-em  110, 111, 112, 113
    long-short-em-desc  114, 115
    long-short-sc  116, 117, 118, 119
    long-short-sc-desc  120, 121
    long-short-sm  122, 123, 124
    long-short-sm-desc  125, 126
    long-short-user  127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135
    long-short-user-desc  136
    nolong-short  137, 138
    nolong-short-em  139
    nolong-short-noreg  140
    nolong-short-sc  141
    nolong-short-sm  142
    postfootnote  143
    short  144
    short-desc  145
    short-em  146
    short-em-desc  147
    short-em-footnote  148, 149
    short-em-footnote-desc  150
    short-em-long  151, 152, 153
    short-em-long-desc  154, 155
    short-em-long-em  156, 157
    short-em-long-em-desc  158
    short-em-nolong  159, 160, 161
    short-em-nolong-desc  162, 163
    short-em-postfootnote  164
    short-footnote  165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174
    short-footnote-desc  175
    short-hyphen-long-hyphen  176, 177
    short-hyphen-long-hyphen-desc  178
    short-hyphen-postlong-hyphen  179, 180
    short-hyphen-postlong-hyphen-desc  181
    short-long  182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192
    short-long-desc  193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199
    short-long-user  200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206
    short-long-user-desc  207
    short-nolong  208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221
    short-nolong-desc  222, 223, 224, 225, 226
    short-nolong-desc-noreg  227
    short-nolong-noreg  228
    short-postfootnote  229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235
    short-postlong-user  236, 237, 238
    short-postlong-user-desc  239
    short-sc  240
    short-sc-desc  241
    short-sc-footnote  242, 243, 244
    short-sc-footnote-desc  245
    short-sc-long  246, 247, 248, 249
    short-sc-long-desc  250, 251
    short-sc-nolong  252, 253, 254
    short-sc-nolong-desc  255, 256
    short-sc-postfootnote  257, 258
    short-sm  259
    short-sm-desc  260
    short-sm-footnote  261
    short-sm-footnote-desc  262
    short-sm-long  263, 264, 265
    short-sm-long-desc  266, 267
    short-sm-nolong  268, 269, 270
    short-sm-nolong-desc  271, 272
    short-sm-postfootnote  273
\abbreviationsname  274
\abbrvpluralsuffix  275
acronym styles (glossaries):
    dua  276
    dua-desc  277
    footnote  278
    footnote-desc  279
    footnote-sc  280
    footnote-sc-desc  281
    footnote-sm  282
    footnote-sm-desc  283
    long-sc-short  284
    long-sc-short-desc  285
    long-short-desc  286
    long-sm-short  287
    long-sm-short-desc  288
    long-sp-short  289, 290
    long-sp-short-desc  291
    sc-short-long  292
    sc-short-long-desc  293
    short-long  294
    short-long-desc  295
    sm-short-long  296
    sm-short-long-desc  297
amsgen package  298
amsmath package  299
\apptoglossarypreamble  300

B babel package  301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309
bib2gls  310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 360, 361, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387, 388, 389
bib2gls  390, 391, 392, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 400, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408, 409, 410, 411, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 421, 422, 423, 424, 425, 426, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 436, 437, 438, 439, 440, 441, 442, 443, 444, 445, 446, 447, 448, 449, 450, 451, 452, 453, 454, 455, 456, 457, 458, 459, 460, 461, 462, 463, 464, 465, 466, 467, 468, 469

C categories:
    abbreviation  470, 471, 472, 473, 474
    acronym  475, 476, 477, 478, 479
    general  480, 481, 482, 483, 484, 485, 486, 487
    index  488, 489
    number  490
    symbol  491, 492
category attributes:
    accessaposplural  493, 494, 495
    accessinsertdots  496
    accessnoshortplural  497
    aposplural  498, 499, 500, 501, 502, 503, 504, 505
    discardperiod  506, 507, 508, 509, 510
    dualindex  511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517
    entrycount  518, 519, 520, 521, 522, 523, 524, 525, 526, 527, 528
    externallocation  529
    firstshortaccess  530
    glossdesc  531, 532, 533
    glossdescfont  534, 535
    glossname  536, 537, 538
    glossnamefont  539, 540, 541
    headuc  542, 543, 544, 545
    hyperoutside  546, 547
    indexname  548, 549, 550, 551, 552
    indexonlyfirst  553, 554, 555
    insertdots  556, 557, 558, 559
    linkcount  560, 561, 562
    linkcountmaster  563, 564
    markshortwords  565, 566
    markwords  567, 568, 569, 570, 571, 572
    nameshortaccess  573
    nohyper  574, 575, 576
    nohyperfirst  577, 578, 579, 580, 581
    noshortplural  582, 583, 584, 585, 586, 587
    pluraldiscardperiod  588, 589
    recordcount  590, 591, 592, 593
    regular  594, 595, 596, 597, 598, 599, 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 605, 606, 607, 608, 609, 610, 611, 612, 613, 614, 615, 616, 617, 618, 619, 620, 621, 622, 623, 624, 625
    retainfirstuseperiod  626
    tagging  627, 628, 629, 630
    targetcategory  631
    targetname  632, 633
    targeturl  634, 635, 636, 637, 638
    textformat  639, 640, 641, 642, 643
    textshortaccess  644
    unitcount  645
    wrgloss  646, 647
\cGLS  648
\cGLSformat  649
\cGLSpl  650
\cGLSplformat  651
convertgls2bib  652
\csGlsXtrLetField  653
\CustomAbbreviationFields  654

D datatool-base package  655

E \eglssetwidest  656
\eglsupdatewidest  657
\eGlsXtrSetField  658
entry location  659, 660, 661
entrycounter package  662
equation (counter)  663, 664
etoolbox package  665, 666, 667, 668, 669, 670, 671, 672, 673

F fancyhdr package  674
first use  675, 676, 677, 678, 679, 680, 681, 682, 683, 684, 685, 686, 687, 688, 689, 690, 691, 692, 693, 694, 695, 696, 697, 698, 699, 700, 701, 702, 703, 704, 705, 706, 707, 708, 709, 710, 711, 712, 713, 714, 715, 716, 717, 718, 719, 720, 721, 722, 723, 724, 725, 726, 727
first use flag  728, 729, 730, 731, 732, 733
first use text  734, 735
fontenc package  736

G \gglssetwidest  737
\gglsupdatewidest  738
\gGlsXtrSetField  739
glossaries package  740, 741, 742, 743, 744, 745, 746, 747, 748,